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timbop

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Great so my Mach-E is going to be just as annoying as windows and tell me "you have 3487 updates" every morning when I start it?

"This update is an important security update and you must wait 45 minutes for it to complete before driving..."
Fortunately it is easy to turn off until you want the updates. Hopefully they don't follow microsoft and increasingly hide the "disable auto updates" mechanism deeper and deeper until they take it out completely.
 

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Great so my Mach-E is going to be just as annoying as windows and tell me "you have 3487 updates" every morning when I start it?

"This update is an important security update and you must wait 45 minutes for it to complete before driving..."
Wait until the "Ford OTA Update" optimizer programs start appearing in the aftermarket vendors. "AVG MME Tune Up."

:p
 

ChasingCoral

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There are a few convenient ways to charge your Mustang Mach-E.* This video will teach you the basics, including how to use the Ford Mobile Charger that comes standard with every vehicle.** You'll never be too far from a charge if needed.

OK, so here's a charging question I can't find the answer to in the Ford "literature": what is the maximum charging rate (power) on the J-1772 side of the Mustang Mach E? We know it can at least charge using a 48A L2 (240v) as that's the current draw of the Ford Connected Charging Station. But how high can it go? Is it 10.5 kW as Clipper Creek says? (see below)

The reason I'm asking, is I plan to order a TeslaTap unit that allows you to charge off a Tesla Wall or Destination charger. I don't have one of those but when traveling I can imagine finding myself at locations like hotels with Tesla Destination (L2) chargers but no J-1772 chargers. I have been to a hotel that was set up with only Tesla Destination (L2) chargers.

The TeslaTap comes in 3 current ratings currently, the Original 40A for $180, a 50A for $190 (definitely worth it), and now a 80A for $240. The 50A is definitely a no brainer vs the 40A as we know the Mach E can handle it and it's only 5% more money. As long as I'm at it, it seems like it might be worth maxing out with the 80A (33% more money) but only if the Mach E can take that much charge. If the Mach E maxes out using the 50A, there's no sense buying more.

I'm thinking the answer is buy the 50A, assuming Clipper Creek knows what they are talking about. Clipper Creek now has the various Mach E models in their EVSE selection system. They list for the Mach E:
Acceptance Rate (kW):10.5
If I remember enough of my electricity calculations,
P=IV, so
P=48*240
P=11,520W or 11.5 kW -- close enough

Checking my math by looking at the Clipper Creek 60 unit (60A circuit, 48A charger) shows a power of 11.5 kW, so my math must be about right. Similarly, the TeslaTap 50A unit says it "should be compatible with any vehicle that uses the J-1772 connector and protocols up to 12 KW". So it seems like Mach E owners would want the 50A TeslaTap.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, the TeslaTap plugs into your J-1772 and a Tesla charger (not Supercharger) plugs into the other end, allowing you to charge off a Tesla Destination charger, which is usually free and Tesla pays to put in at lots of locations.
http://www.umc-j1772.com/index.php?route=product/category&path=17
IMG_4918-228x228.JPG
 

JamieGeek

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OK, so here's a charging question I can't find the answer to in the Ford "literature": what is the maximum charging rate (power) on the J-1772 side of the Mustang Mach E? We know it can at least charge using a 48A L2 (240v) as that's the current draw of the Ford Connected Charging Station. But how high can it go? Is it 10.5 kW as Clipper Creek says? (see below)

The reason I'm asking, is I plan to order a TeslaTap unit that allows you to charge off a Tesla Wall or Destination charger. I don't have one of those but when traveling I can imagine finding myself at locations like hotels with Tesla Destination (L2) chargers but no J-1772 chargers. I have been to a hotel that was set up with only Tesla Destination (L2) chargers.

The TeslaTap comes in 3 current ratings currently, the Original 40A for $180, a 50A for $190 (definitely worth it), and now a 80A for $240. The 50A is definitely a no brainer vs the 40A as we know the Mach E can handle it and it's only 5% more money. As long as I'm at it, it seems like it might be worth maxing out with the 80A (33% more money) but only if the Mach E can take that much charge. If the Mach E maxes out using the 50A, there's no sense buying more.

I'm thinking the answer is buy the 50A, assuming Clipper Creek knows what they are talking about. Clipper Creek now has the various Mach E models in their EVSE selection system. They list for the Mach E:
Acceptance Rate (kW):10.5
If I remember enough of my electricity calculations,
P=IV, so
P=48*240
P=11,520W or 11.5 kW -- close enough

Checking my math by looking at the Clipper Creek 60 unit (60A circuit, 48A charger) shows a power of 11.5 kW, so my math must be about right. Similarly, the TeslaTap 50A unit says it "should be compatible with any vehicle that uses the J-1772 connector and protocols up to 12 KW". So it seems like Mach E owners would want the 50A TeslaTap.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, the TeslaTap plugs into your J-1772 and a Tesla charger (not Supercharger) plugs into the other end, allowing you to charge off a Tesla Destination charger, which is usually free and Tesla pays to put in at lots of locations.
http://www.umc-j1772.com/index.php?route=product/category&path=17
IMG_4918-228x228.JPG
Doesn't really matter. Say the car can only charge at 7kW and you plug into something that reports to the car that it can provide 10kW. The car will only charge at 7kW.

The car decides what it will charge at, the plug only tells the car what it can provide. (A little different than sizing breakers and wiring.)

This is the nature of A/C charging: The car/EVSE combo will charge at the slower rate of the EVSE or car.

Like plugging a C-Max Energi or Fusion Energi into a 6kW EVSE--they still only charge at their 3kW rate.
 

ChasingCoral

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Doesn't really matter. Say the car can only charge at 7kW and you plug into something that reports to the car that it can provide 10kW. The car will only charge at 7kW.

The car decides what it will charge at, the plug only tells the car what it can provide. (A little different than sizing breakers and wiring.)

This is the nature of A/C charging: The car/EVSE combo will charge at the slower rate of the EVSE or car.

Like plugging a C-Max Energi or Fusion Energi into a 6kW EVSE--they still only charge at their 3kW rate.
I agree that the car limits the charging rate. However, I have to decide which one to buy. The higher the power, the higher the cost. No need to buy more power than I can use. It would be good to be able to inform others here who might want one, too.
 

timbop

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OK, so here's a charging question I can't find the answer to in the Ford "literature": what is the maximum charging rate (power) on the J-1772 side of the Mustang Mach E? We know it can at least charge using a 48A L2 (240v) as that's the current draw of the Ford Connected Charging Station. But how high can it go? Is it 10.5 kW as Clipper Creek says? (see below)

The reason I'm asking, is I plan to order a TeslaTap unit that allows you to charge off a Tesla Wall or Destination charger. I don't have one of those but when traveling I can imagine finding myself at locations like hotels with Tesla Destination (L2) chargers but no J-1772 chargers. I have been to a hotel that was set up with only Tesla Destination (L2) chargers.

The TeslaTap comes in 3 current ratings currently, the Original 40A for $180, a 50A for $190 (definitely worth it), and now a 80A for $240. The 50A is definitely a no brainer vs the 40A as we know the Mach E can handle it and it's only 5% more money. As long as I'm at it, it seems like it might be worth maxing out with the 80A (33% more money) but only if the Mach E can take that much charge. If the Mach E maxes out using the 50A, there's no sense buying more.

I'm thinking the answer is buy the 50A, assuming Clipper Creek knows what they are talking about. Clipper Creek now has the various Mach E models in their EVSE selection system. They list for the Mach E:
Acceptance Rate (kW):10.5
If I remember enough of my electricity calculations,
P=IV, so
P=48*240
P=11,520W or 11.5 kW -- close enough

Checking my math by looking at the Clipper Creek 60 unit (60A circuit, 48A charger) shows a power of 11.5 kW, so my math must be about right. Similarly, the TeslaTap 50A unit says it "should be compatible with any vehicle that uses the J-1772 connector and protocols up to 12 KW". So it seems like Mach E owners would want the 50A TeslaTap.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, the TeslaTap plugs into your J-1772 and a Tesla charger (not Supercharger) plugs into the other end, allowing you to charge off a Tesla Destination charger, which is usually free and Tesla pays to put in at lots of locations.
http://www.umc-j1772.com/index.php?route=product/category&path=17
IMG_4918-228x228.JPG
The max is the 48 Amp of the ford connected charger, so nominally 11 kw
 

dbsb3233

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Have we seen that somewhere or is it just an assumption?
It actually charges at 11.5 kW (48A x 240V). We know that because Ford has said the miles added per hour on the 48A Ford Connected charger is 32 miles, while the miles added on the 32A mobile charger is 21. 50% more miles means 50% more kW each hour.

If it was capped at 40A or something, the miles added would have to be lower (commensurate with the kWh being added).
 

ChasingCoral

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It actually charges at 11.5 kW (48A x 240V). We know that because Ford has said the miles added per hour on the 48A Ford Connected charger is 32 miles, while the miles added on the 32A mobile charger is 21. 50% more miles means 50% more kW.
Right. That much I knew. It is capable of 48A, 11.5 kW charging on their system. However, the remaining question is if that is the maximum charging power the Mach E can accept?

My guess is yes, based on the assumption Ford would spec their charger to max out the Mach E’s charging. However, that is an assumption. I was just wondering if we had actually seen the car’s specifications on this.
 

dbsb3233

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Right. That much I knew. It is capable of 48A, 11.5 kW charging on their system. However, the remaining question is if that is the maximum charging power the Mach E can accept?

My guess is yes, based on the assumption Ford would spec their charger to max out the Mach E’s charging. However, that is an assumption. I was just wondering if we had actually seen the car’s specifications on this.
As far as whether it could go higher than 11.5 kW? You're right, we don't know that for sure (although it would be surprising). But we do know it will go up to at least 11.5 kW.
 

macchiaz-o

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Right. That much I knew. It is capable of 48A, 11.5 kW charging on their system. However, the remaining question is if that is the maximum charging power the Mach E can accept?

My guess is yes, based on the assumption Ford would spec their charger to max out the Mach E’s charging. However, that is an assumption. I was just wondering if we had actually seen the car’s specifications on this.
That 10.5kW AC charger figure that Clipper Creek is using comes from Ford's North American specs: https://www.fleet.ford.com/showroom/suvs/mach-e/2021/

More specifically:
-AC Charging: Up to 10.5kW with 48 Amps capability
 

ChasingCoral

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That 10.5kW AC charger figure that Clipper Creek is using comes from Ford's North American specs: https://www.fleet.ford.com/showroom/suvs/mach-e/2021/

More specifically:
Right. Which is language that comes from their charging solutions, not necessarily the vehicle's capacity.

As Clipper Creek works closely with manufacturers, I think they are getting stats from Ford. They only recently added the Mach E. They even have another statistic: vehicle efficiency of 3.41.
Screen Shot 2020-10-09 at 8.36.17 AM.png


Of course, if that is true then the Mach E can't actually use the full power available from the 48A charger, which should be 11.5. This is another reason to believe that maybe the stat you quoted from the specs is right and the car may be limited to 10.5 kW.

Caveat: 220*48 = 10.5 kW. Potentially being a miscalculation of the power based on assuming the US uses 220, not 240. Remember, these are the folks who told us for a long time the mobile charger plugs into a NEMA 15-50 outlet!

What we really need is for Ford to provide something clear that separates the Mach E's charging capabilities from the Ford charging solutions, such as this table from Tesla's website:

Screen Shot 2020-10-09 at 8.53.01 AM.png


Back to the question:
The TeslaTap 40 is rated for up to 9.6 kW, so a little below the Mach E's capacity.
The TeslaTap 50 is rated for up to 12 kW, so a bit above the the Mach E's capacity, assuming either 10.5 or 11.5 kW.
The TeslaTap 50 is rated for up to 19.2 kW, so it's most likely overkill if the Mach E is limited to 10.5 or 11.5. But is it?
 



 










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