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timbop

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Caveat: 220*48 = 10.5 kW. Potentially being a miscalculation of the power based on assuming the US uses 220, not 240.
I would bet your life that the specs given to the one that wrote the web page had "48 amps @ 220v" and that's why it is written as 10.5 instead of 11.5. As Michael Keaton would say "220, 221, whatever it takes".

Ultimately I am certain that the max is 48A and not 43.75A.
 

macchiaz-o

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Right. Which is language that comes from their charging solutions, not necessarily the vehicle's capacity.
I was copying the text from the Mach-E specifications, not the EVSE description. Here's the full text, where we can see more context and I think safely assume it's describing the AC charger built into the North American vehicle, not the outboard EVSEs:

Charge Capability
-SAE J1772 CCS (Combo Connector System) Charge Port capable of charging on 120V, 240V and Direct Current (DC Fast Charge) Power and Heated Glass
-AC Charging: Up to 10.5kW with 48 Amps capability
-DC Charging: Up to 150kW capability
-LED Charge Status Indicator on Charge Port with Courtesy Illumination

Of course, if that is true then the Mach E can't actually use the full power available from the 48A charger, which should be 11.5. This is another reason to believe that maybe the stat you quoted from the specs is right and the car may be limited to 10.5 kW.

Caveat: 220*48 = 10.5 kW. Potentially being a miscalculation of the power based on assuming the US uses 220, not 240. Remember, these are the folks who told us for a long time the mobile charger plugs into a NEMA 15-50 outlet!
Even just yesterday, Darren Palmer referred to the plug as 15-40. It's really easy to mix up numbers. Especially when the authors and editors are more focused towards marketing and legal claims and less focused at technical writing. (I'd hope the most technical of the writers are the ones creating service manuals and owners manuals.)

I think it's safest for you to assume that the max wattage is 250V * 48A, since the specs have it as a 48A AC charger and line voltage is 120V (but up to 125V is commonly found) in the United States, and there are two opposite phase lines combined for a total of up to 250V AC power.

I'd recommend getting the middle tier TeslaTap of the three you described.

Further, I think you'll find that the AC charge limit can be set from the vehicle touch screen, so you want to get the cheaper TeslaTap that would be okay too, as long as you remember to limit the max current via the car's interface or via the EVSE.
 

Kamuelaflyer

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OK, so here's a charging question I can't find the answer to in the Ford "literature": what is the maximum charging rate (power) on the J-1772 side of the Mustang Mach E? We know it can at least charge using a 48A L2 (240v) as that's the current draw of the Ford Connected Charging Station. But how high can it go? Is it 10.5 kW as Clipper Creek says? (see below)

The reason I'm asking, is I plan to order a TeslaTap unit that allows you to charge off a Tesla Wall or Destination charger. I don't have one of those but when traveling I can imagine finding myself at locations like hotels with Tesla Destination (L2) chargers but no J-1772 chargers. I have been to a hotel that was set up with only Tesla Destination (L2) chargers.

The TeslaTap comes in 3 current ratings currently, the Original 40A for $180, a 50A for $190 (definitely worth it), and now a 80A for $240. The 50A is definitely a no brainer vs the 40A as we know the Mach E can handle it and it's only 5% more money. As long as I'm at it, it seems like it might be worth maxing out with the 80A (33% more money) but only if the Mach E can take that much charge. If the Mach E maxes out using the 50A, there's no sense buying more.

I'm thinking the answer is buy the 50A, assuming Clipper Creek knows what they are talking about. Clipper Creek now has the various Mach E models in their EVSE selection system. They list for the Mach E:
Acceptance Rate (kW):10.5
If I remember enough of my electricity calculations,
P=IV, so
P=48*240
P=11,520W or 11.5 kW -- close enough

Checking my math by looking at the Clipper Creek 60 unit (60A circuit, 48A charger) shows a power of 11.5 kW, so my math must be about right. Similarly, the TeslaTap 50A unit says it "should be compatible with any vehicle that uses the J-1772 connector and protocols up to 12 KW". So it seems like Mach E owners would want the 50A TeslaTap.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, the TeslaTap plugs into your J-1772 and a Tesla charger (not Supercharger) plugs into the other end, allowing you to charge off a Tesla Destination charger, which is usually free and Tesla pays to put in at lots of locations.
http://www.umc-j1772.com/index.php?route=product/category&path=17
IMG_4918-228x228.JPG
For those unaware, there's a map of the Tesla Destination Charger Network. This is a great idea Mark.

https://www.tesla.com/destination-charging?redirect=no

and


https://www.tesla.com/findus/list/chargers/United+States
 

ChasingCoral

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I was copying the text from the Mach-E specifications, not the EVSE description. Here's the full text, where we can see more context and I think safely assume it's describing the AC charger built into the North American vehicle, not the outboard EVSEs:






Even just yesterday, Darren Palmer referred to the plug as 15-40. It's really easy to mix up numbers. Especially when the authors and editors are more focused towards marketing and legal claims and less focused at technical writing. (I'd hope the most technical of the writers are the ones creating service manuals and owners manuals.)

I think it's safest for you to assume that the max wattage is 250V * 48A, since the specs have it as a 48A AC charger and line voltage is 120V (but up to 125V is commonly found) in the United States, and there are two opposite phase lines combined for a total of up to 250V AC power.

I'd recommend getting the middle tier TeslaTap of the three you described.

Further, I think you'll find that the AC charge limit can be set from the vehicle touch screen, so you want to get the cheaper TeslaTap that would be okay too, as long as you remember to limit the max current via the car's interface or via the EVSE.
Agreed. I'm leaning toward being convinced the Mach E charging through the J-1772 is in the range of 10.5-11.5 kW. That's at the upper end of any cars I know of except the Teslas with the dual charger. At $180 vs $190, buying the 50A model seems like a no-brainer to me.

Lectron sells a similar adapter, similar price, but only 40A.
 

GoGoGadgetMachE

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Agreed. I'm leaning toward being convinced the Mach E charging through the J-1772 is in the range of 10.5-11.5 kW. That's at the upper end of any cars I know of except the Teslas with the dual charger. At $180 vs $190, buying the 50A model seems like a no-brainer to me.

Lectron sells a similar adapter, similar price, but only 40A.
Interestingly, Lectron makes a 60A that goes the other way (J1772 charger to Tesla car): LECTRON 60 Amp and 250-Volt AC - Compatible with SAE J1772 Chargers (Black) J1772 to Tesla Charging Adapter-4895230305454 - The Home Depot
 

ChasingCoral

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I saw this video back when it was posted internally on September 3rd. Hopefully they publish the other videos too, they are all short like this one and have a similar look and feel so we'll see.....

Ford Mustang Mach-E: At Home Charging
Ford Mustang Mach-E: Charging on the Go
Ford Mustang Mach-E: Connected Navigation
Ford Mustang Mach-E: Drive Experiences and One Pedal Driving
Ford Mustang Mach-E: E-Latch
Ford Mustang Mach-E: Over the Air Updates
SYNC 4A Personalization
Have the rest of these come out yet? It would be good to put them all in one place once they have.
 

Raymondjram

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My local utility was offering a $500 rebate on an Enel-X juicebox 40, so I decided to go that route instead of the Ford Connected option. The Juicebox is only 40amps and the logic would dictate a 50 amp would cut it, however my electrician recommended 60. Done and done and for the last 2 months I’ve had a very cool looking garage illuminating dongle sitting idle and who’s primary function is to remind me I don’t have a car.
I have a 16 kW JuiceBox EVSE that I built from a kit in 2014. So my JuiceBox has been idle for six years.
 

Raymondjram

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The vehicle can tell who’s phone approached from the driver’s side and will load that profile. And you can easily switch profiles if needed.
In my Fusion Hybrid, my phone is set as the default, so even if my wife is driving and gets into the car before me, my phone appears on the infotainment screen. Only if my phone is off or not in the car will the Fusion select her phone.
 

Raymondjram

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Great so my Mach-E is going to be just as annoying as windows and tell me "you have 3487 updates" every morning when I start it?

"This update is an important security update and you must wait 45 minutes for it to complete before driving..."
My Fusion updates are done with a SD card that I load with the software on my laptop after downloading from the Ford web page. So just choose the day and time (preferibly at night) to apply the updates. It takes less than 30 minutes.
 

RyZt

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My Fusion updates are done with a SD card that I load with the software on my laptop after downloading from the Ford web page. So just choose the day and time (preferibly at night) to apply the updates. It takes less than 30 minutes.
Ford has stated that

* Mach E will do OTA, so no SD cars
* Mach E will do upgrade very fast. I don't remember the exact number. (It utilizes a technology known as "dual boot" so that upgrade happens in the background on a secondary copy without interrupting the running system. Once the system restarts, it flips primary to secondary, and secondary to primary. To the user, the "restart" is all the time it takes to upgrade. Under the hood, the system now upgrades the new secondary in the background so it's ready when the next upgrade comes around.)
 

macchiaz-o

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In my Fusion Hybrid, my phone is set as the default, so even if my wife is driving and gets into the car before me, my phone appears on the infotainment screen. Only if my phone is off or not in the car will the Fusion select her phone.
The behavior will be different on Mach-E. The Bluetooth receiver in the car is upgraded compared to your Fusion, so that the car can be connected to multiple Bluetooth devices at the same time.

Further, I believe there are multiple Bluetooth antennas present so that the car can determine proximity of your phones and which "zones" they are most present in. This way it knows which phone is closest to the driver door (to set the driver profile) and whether it is inside or outside the car (to determine whether the car may be driven).

This is essentially the same logic used for keyless entry, which your Fusion probably has. Now it is just implemented on multiple radios... 434 MHz or whatever for your key fob, and 2.4 GHz or whatever for Bluetooth. (And different radio waveforms/protocols, obviously.)
 

Raymondjram

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I agree that the car limits the charging rate. However, I have to decide which one to buy. The higher the power, the higher the cost. No need to buy more power than I can use. It would be good to be able to inform others here who might want one, too.
I recommend planning for your next EVs when you decide to buy a Level 2 EVSE. The next EVs may take higher charger power. You will save money spending more now.

I bought a 16 kW JuiceBox Level 2 EVSE in 2014 before GM or Ford announced their EVs. It is presently set at 7.2 kW, but just changing the supply wiring and circuit breaker allows uprating. It cost me less than $300 as a kit. It is worth over $600 now and maybe more in the future..
 



 










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