PrimeFuture

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Looking to get new tires as my OEMs are nearly bare by this point (43,000 miles). I drive a TON on highways, and all the discussions on tires consistently say range reduction hits more on highway with wider tires. So that's not a logical option for me.

Has anyone bought tires that have increased their range?

If not, I'm probably going to stick with the OEM Michelin Primacys 225x55x19 that came stock with my Premium.

 

TD1273

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Looking to get new tires as my OEMs are nearly bare by this point (43,000 miles). I drive a TON on highways, and all the discussions on tires consistently say range reduction hits more on highway with wider tires. So that's not a logical option for me.

Has anyone bought tires that have increased their range?

If not, I'm probably going to stick with the OEM Michelin Primacys 225x55x19 that came stock with my Premium.
Looking to get new tires as my OEMs are nearly bare by this point (43,000 miles). I drive a TON on highways, and all the discussions on tires consistently say range reduction hits more on highway with wider tires. So that's not a logical option for me.

Has anyone bought tires that have increased their range?

If not, I'm probably going to stick with the OEM Michelin Primacys 225x55x19 that came stock with my Premium.
Well what do have for range now? We ordered our Premium AWD Ext range with the summer tires option which is a Continental and we’re set to go on trip tomorrow and with 100% charge it’s showing range 325 miles
 

tuminatr

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If you do alot of highway driving I would suggest getting a set of CR1 18" wheels. The CR1 AWD is rated at 313 miles and there is no mechanical difference between it and the Premium AWD. I would also stick with a low rolling resistance tire. In one of Michelins press releases, they mentioned that the Primacy A/S is the most efficient tire they make.

I switched to CR1 wheels and my car picked up the range on the highway. The mile per KWH is averaging around 3.4 and I think that's really good. And yes that 3.4 on the highway @75mph road tripping.
 
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tuminatr

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Well what do have for range now? We ordered our Premium AWD Ext range with the summer tires option which is a Continental and we’re set to go on trip tomorrow and with 100% charge it’s showing range 325 miles
The OEM summer option is a Continental Premium Contact and I understand that a very low rolling resistance tire. However, I don't think you can currently buy them aftermarket. If you wanted to consider that check the marketplace I think I saw a take-off 19" set there.

It appears that we are about a year out from the major manufacturers making EV-specific tires and that will be a big help.
 
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Pushrods&Capacitors

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I’m in the camp of grip when it comes to tires. Low rolling resistance tires currently available have consistently worse showings where braking is concerned. And I’m not talking about 3-5 ft differences, I’m talking 15-25 ft from 65-70mph to 0. That’s a car length plus. Not worth the extra 10 miles imo.
 


TD1273

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The OEM summer option is a Continental Premium Contact and I understand that a very low rolling resistance tire. However, I don't think you can currently buy them aftermarket. If you wanted to consider that check the marketplace I think I saw a take-off 19" set there.

It appears that we are about a year out from the major manufacturers making EV-specific tires and that will be a big help.
Tire dealer where we live has got them in stock. You can also get them from Tire Rack
 

Pushrods&Capacitors

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The OEM summer option is a Continental Premium Contact and I understand that a very low rolling resistance tire. However, I don't think you can currently buy them aftermarket. If you wanted to consider that check the marketplace I think I saw a take-off 19" set there.

It appears that we are about a year out from the major manufacturers making EV-specific tires and that will be a big help.
We had the OEM Conti Premium Contact 6 summers on my wife’s 4X for about 2k miles before we got the 20” OZ wheels with 255/45-20s Conti ExtremeContact DWS06s. We only lost approx 10-12 miles of range. Well worth it for much better looks and lateral/longitudinal grip.

Tire Rack has the OEM summers for about $220 each iirc. They’re actually an OEM Porsche fitment designated by the NF0 on the sidewall. Obviously good enough for Porsche is good enough for Ford.

https://m.tirerack.com/tires/tires....PC6XLNF0&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes
 

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I’m in the camp of grip when it comes to tires. Low rolling resistance tires currently available have consistently worse showings where braking is concerned. And I’m not talking about 3-5 ft differences, I’m talking 15-25 ft from 65-70mph to 0. That’s a car length plus. Not worth the extra 10 miles imo.
All tires are a compromise, the best in wet are summer-only tires. Funny how many people in the south run all season thinking they will be better in the wet. (not directed at you just an observation)

Everybody makes a compromise I put all-weather tires on mine, and a huge improvement in handling, feel, and wet grip. And with the CR1 wheels an improvement in range over stock.

If you used the OEM Michelin Primacy A/S and CR1 wheels I think you would get that 313 CR1 rated range. Mine is close I have seen 286 miles on the highway more at city speeds, and the tires I use are not LRR

A summer tire can make as much difference in wet and dry over a good all-season as a winter tire does in snow, sleet, and cold over a good all-season.
 
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I think the OEM type is your best bet unless you are considering a smaller wheel. When Ford engineered this car, they tested lots of different tires and selected the one that offers the maximum range while still having just enough grip and plenty of strength. They knew their first ground up BEV better meet or exceed the range expectations and they achieved that goal plus some.
 

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I have been driving on the Michelin Pilot Sport AS UHP for about 1500 miles now on the factory Premium rims and sizes. I get much better grip and better braking and still get great efficiency.

2.9 to 3.2 m/kw at 70-75 MPH. I run the tire pressure at 45-46 psi for the ride quality. The tires are rated for 50 psi for the XL load range. At 47 psi the tread is flat on the ground and is wearing even. The Mach-E handles like a Mustang should.
 

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All tires are a compromise, the best in wet are summer-only tires. Funny how many people in the south run all season thinking they will be better in the wet. (not directed at you just an observation)

Everybody makes a compromise I put all-weather tires on mine, and a huge improvement in handling, feel, and wet grip. And with the CR1 wheels an improvement in range over stock.

If you used the OEM Michelin Primacy A/S and CR1 wheels I think you would get that 313 CR1 rated range. Mine is close I have seen 286 miles on the highway more at city speeds, and the tires I use are not LRR

A summer tire can make as much difference in wet and dry over a good all-season as a winter tire does in snow, sleet, and cold over a good all-season.
I agree, and that’s why my SS sedan runs exclusively on max performance summer tires.
 

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I think the OEM type is your best bet unless you are considering a smaller wheel. When Ford engineered this car, they tested lots of different tires and selected the one that offers the maximum range while still having just enough grip and plenty of strength. They knew their first ground up BEV better meet or exceed the range expectations and they achieved that goal plus some.
I think one caveat to that might be the fact Ford had to consider that the cars are going to live in disparate places like Minnesota vs Arizona. It may be possible that one could optimize the tires for their climate…..OP is in Houston and should rarely, if ever, drive in snow, for example. I have not done any research that would support this, only offering as an observation.

For someone like me, at a latitude of 40N, I’ll stick with the OEM.
 

tuminatr

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I have been driving on the Michelin Pilot Sport AS UHP for about 1500 miles now on the factory Premium rims and sizes. I get much better grip and better braking and still get great efficiency.

2.9 to 3.2 m/kw at 70-75 MPH. I run the tire pressure at 45-46 psi for the ride quality. The tires are rated for 50 psi for the XL load range. At 47 psi the tread is flat on the ground and is wearing even. The Mach-E handles like a Mustang should.
as an FYI tire pressure is set by the automobile manufacturer to maximize the tire's contact patch. On the pillar near your driver's door latch, you will find a placard that shows how much pressure ford recommends. The recommended pressure for a 19" wheel premium is 39psi. At 47 psi the tire is over-inflated and will wear out the center first

Screenshot 2022-09-17 110904.jpg
 

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I think one caveat to that might be the fact Ford had to consider that the cars are going to live in disparate places like Minnesota vs Arizona. It may be possible that one could optimize the tires for their climate…..OP is in Houston and should rarely, if ever, drive in snow, for example. I have not done any research that would support this, only offering as an observation.

For someone like me, at a latitude of 40N, I’ll stick with the OEM.
Agreed.
I originally was planning to switch to summer tires when my OEM set wore out. Then I started to wonder why Ford used summer tires for the EU market. I would not consider European weather to align with Arizona weather so the term "Summer Tire" might simply mean "not for harsh winter weather".

So, I was all set to get a new set of summer tires and then I saw the tread wear rating almost half of the A/S. So, I decided to stick with the OE spec since the first set performed so well. I had 49,655 miles with about 4.5/32" of tread left when I changed them out. Ride was good. Grip was just enough so I am thinking the engineers at Ford and Michelin know what they are doing. Much smarter than me anyway....
:)
 

tuminatr

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Agreed.
I originally was planning to switch to summer tires when my OEM set wore out. Then I started to wonder why Ford used summer tires for the EU market. I would not consider European weather to align with Arizona weather so the term "Summer Tire" might simply mean "not for harsh winter weather".

So, I was all set to get a new set of summer tires and then I saw the tread wear rating almost half of the A/S. So, I decided to stick with the OE spec since the first set performed so well. I had 49,655 miles with about 4.5/32" of tread left when I changed them out. Ride was good. Grip was just enough so I am thinking the engineers at Ford and Michelin know what they are doing. Much smarter than me anyway....
:)
The difference is in Europe to be considered an all-season tire you need to have the TPMSF three-peak mountain snowflake rating.

Also, there is no such thing as a mileage warranty in Europe, so buyers make different choices than American buyers. The choices made in Europe are more based on traction and less on how long the tire will last. Summer tires give you much more grip but like you stated at the cost of longevity. So we all make trade-offs I would rather have traction.

I attached a map showing where Europe falls latitude-wise compared to the USA.

It's fairly normal for folks to run a winter and summer set. Some countries also require TPMSF-rated tires to be installed during certain months.

American all-season tires have traditionally been crap under 40F. I believe they are better these days but if they did qualify for the TPMSF rating they would have it.

latitudes.jpg

 
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