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EA kWh Pricing Announced

ChasingCoral

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I was expecting something closer to the Ionity rate in Europe when they switched to per-kWh pricing (roughly $0.93/kWh). Figured they must have calculated that as a sustainable rate to self-fund the network.

But $0.43/kWh is way lower. Electricity costs less in the US, so that's surely part of it, but this is such a low rate that it doesn't seem sustainable to me to cover all the costs. Could actually make it harder for other competitors to enter the market.
Same price in Maryland and DC, $0.43/kWh. Nice!
 

KAustin

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Not that I plan on using DC chargers very often, but I had assumed VA doesn't allow per kWh charging, and I guess I was correct.

Hopefully the states that don't yet allow it will quickly change course. I know in VA the local utilities around me claim to have a hard time even getting time-of-day for EV charging approved by the SCC.
VA never fails to disappoint. No per kWh charging and no tax benefit for EVs. UGH!!!
 

dbsb3233

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VA never fails to disappoint. No per kWh charging and no tax benefit for EVs. UGH!!!
Well FWIW, your new per-minute rates are actually cheaper than the per-kWh rates (on the MME anyway). Significantly so.
 

DaveRuns

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Not that I plan on using DC chargers very often, but I had assumed VA doesn't allow per kWh charging, and I guess I was correct.

Hopefully the states that don't yet allow it will quickly change course. I know in VA the local utilities around me claim to have a hard time even getting time-of-day for EV charging approved by the SCC.
I live in VA as well, and It seems they are doing everything possible to dissuade EV ownership (no special EV charging rates, no EV tax rebates, no HOV lane access, no kw/hr charging, etc). With the ultra-liberal governor we have, I can't believe there isn't more special consideration for EV owners.
 

timbop

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Well FWIW, your new per-minute rates are actually cheaper than the per-kWh rates (on the MME anyway). Significantly so.
Yup.

On a SR RWD it comes out to $.0916/mile for the per kwh fee, and a paltry $.0566/mile with the per minute charging when going from 10%-80% at the target range of 230 miles. The per-minute for the ER RWD is slightly better at $.0514/mile.

** EDITED FOR BAD MATH
 
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RyZt

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Pricing per kWh (California)
Member - $0.31/kWh
non-Member - $0.43/kWh
Wow! The member rate is cheaper than what PG&E charges for home electricity in San Francisco Bay Area during partial-peak hours and peak hours with the EV2A plan. It's a time-of-use plan:
  • Off-peak is daily midnight to 3pm at 16.9c/kwh.
  • Peak is 4pm to 9pm at 35.5c/kwh (winter) or 48.2c/kwh (summer).
  • The rest is partial-peak at 33.8c/kwh (winter) or 37.1c/kwh (summer).
 
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JayTee

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So this eliminates the price penalty for charging above ~80%.

Still have the slow time penalty though (i.e. wasted time). And the risk of idle fees if you leave the car and forget to come back in time after it hits 100%.

Hope the app has alarms built in.

Guaranteed unpopular:
I've always thought that charger owners should have both a KWH based and a time-based billing system.

There has to be some penalty for eating dinner while your car charges from 90% to 99%.
 

dbsb3233

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Yup.

On a SR RWD it comes out to $.064/mile for the per kwh fee, and a paltry $.039/mile with the per minute charging when going from 10%-80% at the target range of 230 miles. The per-minute for the ER RWD is even better at $.036/mile.
I get a bit more, but yeah, still WAY better than it was. I figured it would cost about 2x to EA charge over gas under the old rates. Now I figure it's nearly even.

Depends a lot on what one assumes for mileage though (miles/kWh). 10-80% of 88 kWh is 61.6. 70% of 270 mile range (AWD ER) = 189 miles. At $0.31/kWh subscription rate that's $19.09. Thus $19.09/189 miles = $0.10/mile.

But that range is based on lower combined speed. Estimate maybe 10% less at 65 MPH, and 20% less at 75 MPH. That bumps it up to around $0.12/mile.
 

timbop

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I get a bit more, but yeah, still WAY better than it was. I figured it would cost about 2x to EA charge over gas under the old rates. Now I figure it's nearly even.

Depends a lot on what one assumes for mileage though (miles/kWh). 10-80% of 88 kWh is 61.6. 70% of 270 mile range (AWD ER) = 189 miles. At $0.31/kWh subscription rate that's $19.09. Thus $19.09/189 miles = $0.10/mile.

But that range is based on lower combined speed. Estimate maybe 10% less at 65 MPH, and 20% less at 75 MPH. That bumps it up to around $0.12/mile.
yes, I fixed my math. serves me right for eating a sandwich, doing math, and posting simultaneously
 

dbsb3233

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..
Now the real question will be what the Ford Pass discount will be.
My money is still on it being the EA Pass+ rates. Especially now that the EA rates have come down dramatically. I can't hardly imagine the FordPass rate would be discounted lower than $0.31/kWh.

On a separate note, the value of the free 250 kWh that Ford is giving us just dropped some. It's $77.50 at the $0.31 rate. Don't think anyone will be complaining though. 😋
 

s7davis

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Are people forgetting that when you on trips you will never need to top fully up except before you leave house. Rest of the time you are just topping of the juice to get to either destination to plug in or to next charger to plug in. So their should be no idling or fees. The way it is set up I think is you go in to charge at say 3% and you will charge to like 80% if that to get to next charger or destination so charge rate does not go down. So you are getting most juice when charging . Then you leave and by the time you at next stop you are at like 10% or so on.

of course I’m thinking on how Tesla does it but you do not need to fill car up fully on juice to get going agai that’s how you keep moving
 

timbop

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The way it is set up I think is you go in to charge at say 3% and you will charge to like 80% if that to get to next charger or destination so charge rate does not go down. So you are getting most juice when charging . Then you leave and by the time you at next stop you are at like 10% or so on.
What you're missing is that there is no penalty other than TIME IDLE to go up to 100% instead of 80%.

The assertion is that someone with a MME at 10% SOC stops at the charger across the street from a nice restaurant in the middle of a long trip. Said person want s a nice sitdown meal that could take an hour. SO, said person sets the "finish" charge % to 100% and goes into the restaurant. Finally, an hour later they come out of the restaurant and their MME is just hitting 100%, so no idle fees and now the car has a more of a charge to make the next stop go faster. In the meantime, that charger was in use for an hour or more instead of the customary 30-45 minutes
 

Yoliber

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Would charging stations even know your vehicle's SoC? I kind of doubt it. I think they will have an idle charge like Tesla. Maybe they will have a tiered system where after 50 kWh it will increase the price per kWh, but I doubt that as well.
 



 










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