lwilliams0514

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Read about the testing here.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-news/testing-teslas-range-anxiety.html

https://www.edmunds.com/car-news/electric-car-range-and-consumption-epa-vs-edmunds.html



The Leaderboard: Best Real-World EV Range
The Chart: Edmunds' EV Testing Data vs. EPA Estimates




edmunds-logo-and-text-generic.png
RangeConsumptionConditions
VehicleEPA
estimated
Edmunds
tested
EPA
estimated
Edmunds
tested
Ambient
temperature
2021 Audi
e-tron Sportback
218 miles238 miles*
(+9.2%)
44 kWh/
100 mi
38.2 kWh/
100 mi
(+13.2%)
71°
2020 Chevrolet
Bolt
259 miles277 miles
(+6.9%)
29 kWh/
100 mi
25.7 kWh/
100 mi
(+11.4%)
60°
2021 Ford
Mustang Mach-E AWD Ext Range
270 miles304 miles
(+12.6%)
37 kWh/
100 mi
33.1 kWh/
100 mi
(+10.5%)
62°
2020 Hyundai
Ioniq Electric
170 miles202 miles
(+18.9%)
25 kWh/
100 mi
20.8 kWh/
100 mi
(+16.8%)
70°
2019 Hyundai
Kona Electric
258 miles315 miles
(+21.9%)
28 kWh/
100 mi
22.3 kWh/
100 mi
(+20.4%)
61°
2020 Kia
Niro EV
239 miles285 miles
(+19.2%)
30 kWh/
100 mi
25.3 kWh/
100 mi
(+15.7%)
67°
2020 MINI
Cooper SE
110 miles150 miles
(+36.5%)
31 kWh/
100 mi
21.8 kWh/
100 mi
(+29.7%)
62°
2020 Nissan
Leaf Plus SL
215 miles237 miles
(+10.2%)
32 kWh/
100 mi
27.1 kWh/
100 mi
(+15.3%)
67°
2021 Polestar
2 Performance
233 miles228 miles*
(-2.1%)
37 kWh/
100 mi
35.2 kWh/
100 mi
(+4.9%)
67°
2020 Porsche
Taycan 4S
203 miles323 miles*
(+59.3%)
49 kWh/
100 mi
32.3 kWh/
100 mi
(+34.1%)
73°
2020 Tesla
Model S Performance
326 miles318 miles*
(-2.5%)
35 kWh/
100 mi
32.6 kWh/
100 mi
(+6.9%)
60°
2018 Tesla
Model 3 Performace
310 miles256 miles*
(-17.4%)
29 kWh/
100 mi
30.1 kWh/
100 mi
(-3.8%)
61°
2021 Tesla
Model 3 Long Range
353 miles345 miles*
(-2.3%)
25 kWh/
100 mi
25.9 kWh/
100 mi
(-3.6%)
53°
2020 Tesla
Model 3 Standard Range Plus
250 miles232 miles*
(-7.2%)
24 kWh/
100 mi
23.0 kWh/
100 mi
(+4.2%)
67°
2020 Tesla
Model X Long Range
328 miles294 miles*
(-10.4%)
35 kWh/
100 mi
35.0 kWh/
100 mi
0.0%
60°
2020 Tesla
Model Y Performance
291 miles263 miles*
(-9.6%)
30 kWh/
100 mi
29.6 kWh/
100 mi
(+1.3%)
65°
2021 Volkswagen
ID.4 First Edition
250 miles287 miles*
(+14.8%)
35 kWh/
100 mi
28.8 kWh/
100 mi
(+17.7%)
63°


  • In February 2021, we reported that every Tesla failed to hit its EPA range estimate in Edmunds' real-world EV range testing.
  • Tesla disputed our test results, stating that the full range of its vehicles' batteries was not being accounted for.
  • Tesla argued that we hadn't accounted for the safety buffer: additional miles after an indicated zero that would see its vehicles match EPA figures.
  • We assembled a group of five new electric vehicles from Tesla, Ford and Volkswagen to test Tesla's claim.
  • Our tests showed that there is no fixed safety buffer. Even allowing for the additional miles recorded after an indicated zero, only two of the six Teslas we tested would hit their EPA figures in our real-world conditions.
Nice to see that the MME over performed. Would have been nice to see the RWD one in the test.

I think the Porsche over performed because their car is designed to drive like a sports car - fast. If you drive it like a grandma on cruise at 65mph its going to over perform. LOL.
 

All Hat No Cattle

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Please excuse me if this is old news, but it just showed up in my local paper today. The takeaway from this long article are the last 2 paragraphs I put in Bold.

Tesla fudging the numbers again, saying that their range is what they say it is, if you run your battery below empty. WTF??
Edmunds puts Tesla’s range to the test

Published Wednesday, March 31, 2021 | 6:03 a.m.

Updated Wednesday, March 31, 2021 | 6:03 a.m.

Edmunds’ test team recently published the results of its real-world range testing for electric vehicles. Notably, every Tesla the team tested in 2020 came up short of matching the EPA’s range estimate. Almost all other EVs Edmunds tested met or exceeded those estimates.

That result, as you can likely guess, ruffled some feathers at Tesla headquarters.

A CHALLENGE FROM TESLA

The lackluster results prompted the automaker to reach out to the Edmunds test team. Tesla’s engineers disputed our figures and argued that by stopping our EV range tests at zero indicated miles, rather than pressing on until the battery died, we were underestimating their vehicles’ true range.

Tesla said its vehicles have a safety buffer that ensures drivers can keep going even when the indicated range displayed zero miles. And when you factored in this buffer, Tesla argued, it would allow their vehicles to match the EPA range estimates, which are typically measured when the battery is fully depleted.

It was a challenge we at Edmunds were up for, so we rented a 7.5-mile-long closed-course oval at an unaffiliated automaker’s proving ground in California’s Mojave Desert. This facility allowed us to safely drive five EVs until their battery power completely ran out. Tesla provided a Model 3 Long Range for us to test. We also brought along the Edmunds-owned Model 3 Standard Range Plus and Model Y Performance used in our original range testing, plus two non-Teslas for comparison purposes: a Ford Mustang Mach-E and an Volkswagen ID.4. These were also provided by their manufacturers.

THE TEST

Most in-car range meters factor in your recent driving habits when forecasting the remaining range. Edmunds’ editors needed to drive the vehicles in the same manner to normalize the range meters and provide a level playing field.

At the test track, we drove the five EVs at a common highway speed of 65 mph, with the automatic climate control set to 72 degrees, audio off, no accessories plugged in, and with drivers rotating in one-hour shifts, until the batteries were depleted. Once each vehicle’s range estimate indicated zero miles, we measured how far it could go before coming to a complete stop.

Miles Traveled Past Zero

Ford Mustang Mach-E Extended Range: 7.3 miles

Tesla Model Y Performance: 12.6 miles

Volkswagen ID.4: 12.9 miles

Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus: 17.6 miles

Tesla Model 3 Long Range: 25.9 miles

Notice how the buffer can vary even within the same brand. The Model 3 Long Range went twice as far as the Model Y. What’s more, there was no indication how far you could keep going since all vehicles simply read zero miles remaining. For all we knew, the cars could stop at any moment.

BOLSTERING OUR RESULTS

We also ran a control test on the Edmunds’ EV range route with the Model 3 Long Range and Model Y Performance, driving them to the end of their battery life on public roads. The Model Y traveled 11 miles past zero and the Model 3 went an extra 17.5 miles; both were less than the buffers we experienced at the test track.

We asked Tesla about this discrepancy in the reserve range. The automaker said that the buffer was based on a combination of near-past conditions and instantaneous conditions, essentially the weather and terrain variation, which was why “the buffer cannot be defined exactly to a number every time.”

TAKEAWAYS FOR THE EV SHOPPER

Some Teslas would be capable of meeting their EPA estimates in Edmunds’ real-world range test if we included their reserve battery range, or the distance we traveled running beyond the point of zero indicated miles left.

But even in this scenario, there would be requirements such as driving conservatively in a temperate climate and using Tesla’s maximum battery charge, even though Tesla recommends this for long-distance trips only.

The majority of Teslas we’ve tested so far — four of the six — do not meet their EPA estimates even allowing for a safety buffer. Furthermore, almost every other EV Edmunds has tested met or exceeded EPA estimates without the need to include their safety buffers.

Potential Tesla shoppers should know that to use the full range as advertised, they need to feel comfortable going past the zero indicated mile mark. This is not only risky, but it also requires the owner to deeply discharge the battery, which isn’t recommended for the long-term health of the battery.


EDMUNDS SAYS: Edmunds’ EV range test isn’t meant to be the definitive word on a vehicle’s range but rather a real-world complement to the laboratory-based EPA testing. We’ll continue to test to an indicated zero because we’d never advise customers to rely on the unpredictable buffer range.
 

timbop

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Please excuse me if this is old news, but it just showed up in my local paper today. The takeaway from this long article are the last 2 paragraphs I put in Bold.

Tesla fudging the numbers again, saying that their range is what they say it is, if you run your battery below empty. WTF??
It is old news, but worth repeating because every lazy reviewer harps on the same lie that the Model Y has much more range than the ER Mach E. Alex on autos actually did a head to head test, and the model Y didn't even hit the Mach E's EPA range let alone its own.
 
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