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EPA Range for Porsche Taycan is 201 Miles

E55 KEV

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People who own Porsches that cost over $100k do not usually take them on long out-of-town road trips (they mostly fly, or take a train or use an ICE vehicle), and so they won't care if the Taycan gets only 200-250 miles of range, because they'll be using their Taycans almost exclusively without resorting to public chargers (like most BEV owners today, they'll do 95%-99% of their charging at home).
Really? Porsche owners don't drive their cars "on long out-of-tow road trips" or "they mostly fly, or take a train"?

I cant imagine owners of Macans, Cayennes and Panameras not driving those large cars out of town. If the Taycan is to compete with a Tesla Model S or the upcoming Mercedes EQS Sedan it better get better mileage than 201 miles.
 
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cometguy

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Really? Porsche owners don't drive their cars "on long out-of-tow road trips" or "they mostly fly, or take a train"?

I cant imagine owners of Macans, Cayennes and Panameras not driving those large cars out of town. If the Taycan is to compete with a Tesla Model S or the upcoming Mercedes EQS Sedan it better get better mileage than 201 miles.
Yep. Most people that can afford cars with new MSRP over $60k USD prefer to fly any distance longer than about 200 miles. There are exceptions, of course, but I'm saying "most people". The more expensive a car is, the quicker it depreciates after driven new off the lot; age and odometer reading are the two biggest factors for depreciation (ignoring the huge effect if the car has been in an accident). My general take is that if you can buy a luxury car worth about $120k or less (but not more), you are likely to worry about warranty expiration much more than if the car is worth well over that amount (because repair costs, which can be insanely expensive in Porsches outside of warranty) generally are bought by people who can afford high repair costs. Many Porsche drivers lease their cars, so are restricted to 3 years and 12k or 15k miles anyway (most common lease length). So for those who drive Porsche cross-country (and it's more the SUVs that are thus driven) will not have leases. A $115k Panamera (MSRP, new) will garner no more than about $80k in trade-in value after one year and 20k miles, for example; that's a $35k drop in one year. If you look online for used Panameras, you'll find most have under 50k miles on them -- even ones that are 4-5 years old. Lots of people enjoy driving them locally, for commuting or joy riding, while keeping the mileage to 5k-10k/year.

Taycans won't be driven on long road trips, any more than most BEVs will. I think that few Bolt and Leaf owners take long road trips; they use them mostly for local commuting. Ditto with Tesla owners. I drive cross-country a lot -- at least one 6k- to 8k-mile trip each year and a bunch of shorter long-distance trips; I won't take any BEV on such a trip with the public-charging infrastructure so poor at this point, but that won't stop me from buying a BEV because I'll use it as a daily driver while at home, charging in my garage nearly exclusively. So for me, and I think for most BEV drivers, 200 miles of range is fine.
 

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Yep. Most people that can afford cars with new MSRP over $60k USD prefer to fly any distance longer than about 200 miles. There are exceptions, of course, but I'm saying "most people". The more expensive a car is, the quicker it depreciates after driven new off the lot; age and odometer reading are the two biggest factors for depreciation (ignoring the huge effect if the car has been in an accident). My general take is that if you can buy a luxury car worth about $120k or less (but not more), you are likely to worry about warranty expiration much more than if the car is worth well over that amount (because repair costs, which can be insanely expensive in Porsches outside of warranty) generally are bought by people who can afford high repair costs. Many Porsche drivers lease their cars, so are restricted to 3 years and 12k or 15k miles anyway (most common lease length). So for those who drive Porsche cross-country (and it's more the SUVs that are thus driven) will not have leases. A $115k Panamera (MSRP, new) will garner no more than about $80k in trade-in value after one year and 20k miles, for example; that's a $35k drop in one year. If you look online for used Panameras, you'll find most have under 50k miles on them -- even ones that are 4-5 years old. Lots of people enjoy driving them locally, for commuting or joy riding, while keeping the mileage to 5k-10k/year.

Taycans won't be driven on long road trips, any more than most BEVs will. I think that few Bolt and Leaf owners take long road trips; they use them mostly for local commuting. Ditto with Tesla owners. I drive cross-country a lot -- at least one 6k- to 8k-mile trip each year and a bunch of shorter long-distance trips; I won't take any BEV on such a trip with the public-charging infrastructure so poor at this point, but that won't stop me from buying a BEV because I'll use it as a daily driver while at home, charging in my garage nearly exclusively. So for me, and I think for most BEV drivers, 200 miles of range is fine.
There is currently a sense of adventure that comes with road tripping a BEV. There's nothing novel let alone challenging about road tripping in a gas car but make it a CCS EV? Now that's something new and it's not easy but instead worth talking about and noticing.
 

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There is currently a sense of adventure that comes with road tripping a BEV. There's nothing novel let alone challenging about road tripping in a gas car but make it a CCS EV? Now that's something new and it's not easy but instead worth talking about and noticing.
While that's true (that a long BEV road trip is something some people take on because of the challenge, and maybe a little adrenaline rush from the risk), that's certainly going to be the exception rather than the rule. That's more the enthusiasts and the advocates, that take on the challenge like it's a road rally, just to "prove it cane be done".

But for the other 98% of the public, who are loading the spouse and 2 kids into the car for a drive across 3 states to Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon, no. They want safety and dependability. That's what the vast majority of people want.
 

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While that's true (that a long BEV road trip is something some people take on because of the challenge, and maybe a little adrenaline rush from the risk), that's certainly going to be the exception rather than the rule. That's more the enthusiasts and the advocates, that take on the challenge like it's a road rally, just to "prove it cane be done".

But for the other 98% of the public, who are loading the spouse and 2 kids into the car for a drive across 3 states to Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon, no. They want safety and dependability. That's what the vast majority of people want.
I am certain I am an outlier, but I am looking forward to the semiautonomous capabilities of the Mach-E for long road trips. My wife gets claustrophobic and refuses to fly, and even had some difficulties being in an amtrak superliner bedroom when we took one to florida in 2018. She's OK in a car because of the surrounding windows that give her the illusion of not actually being trapped in a small space. I hate having to be stuck in one position driving for hours at a time, so the handsfree driving and requirement not to drive more than a couple of hours continuously are both welcome for me.
 

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Yep. Most people that can afford cars with new MSRP over $60k USD prefer to fly any distance longer than about 200 miles. There are exceptions, of course, but I'm saying "most people". The more expensive a car is, the quicker it depreciates after driven new off the lot; age and odometer reading are the two biggest factors for depreciation
Yo Bro, this is the second very long post you have made with a whole lot of assumptions, generalizations and presumptions that may only be related to you, how you drive and how you fly. With so many assumptions it's hard (for me) to take your post in any serous way. I can't speak for you but you found it easy to speak for me and everyone else. I live in DC and not going fly to North Carolina (233 miles) or New York (225 miles) or Pittsburgh (245 miles) when I got large luxury performance vehicles and I'm not going worry about depreciation so much that I'm leaving cars at home and flying on a simple 200 mile trip.
 
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dbsb3233

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I don't mean "safety" as in physical vehicle (crash) safety, I mean safety as in without fear of running out of electricity or not being able to get a timely charge at the numerous necessary stops along the way. (I suppose when worded that way the word is actually "safely").

For long road trips, availability of enough chargers in the right places is only one third of the issue. Frequency of recharging (on interstate-speed drives where range drops significantly), and length of charging (as you mentioned), are the other two. It's those 3 things combined that will turn most people off to BEVs for road trips (although there are certainly some that take that as a challenge).

But conversely, they're very advantageous for around-home usage where you have a house and a garage to charge overnight at residential rates. Right tool for the right job. That's why the perfect market for BEVs is homeowners where there will also be a 2nd (ICE or PHEV) vehicle in the household.
 

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playing with abetterrouteplanner has been useful for me to learn what life might be like taking a longer road trip with an EV (mach-e vs tesla, etc).

while having greater range and rapid recharge is always better, we realistically almost always take a meal/bathroom break when we drive from LA to SF bay area. that means with either the mach-e or tesla, we will have a 35-45 minute stop. now with the mach-e, i probably will need another shorter 10min stop to charge up, whereas the tesla may not no need it (depending on conditions - weather, speed, etc)

to me, that's reasonable trade off for the other benefits the mach-e has over the tesla.

so when people say a road trip with EV vs ICE means 4 hrs vs 30minute for fueling, that's technically true. but if a couple of the gas stops are also stops you planned to eat/stretch, etc. the time difference may be significantly less EV vs ICE.

either way, looking forward to my 1st EV and seeing the charging network 1st hand (and see it grow!)
 

dbsb3233

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From only the standpoint of being stranded, yes. But the "issue" I was referring to is more than that. I meant significant fuel-related disadvantages relative to ICE (for distance driving). It's the sparse charging network plus long charging times plus short range at interstate speeds that combine for the triple-whammy.
 

dbsb3233

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playing with abetterrouteplanner has been useful for me to learn what life might be like taking a longer road trip with an EV (mach-e vs tesla, etc).

while having greater range and rapid recharge is always better, we realistically almost always take a meal/bathroom break when we drive from LA to SF bay area. that means with either the mach-e or tesla, we will have a 35-45 minute stop. now with the mach-e, i probably will need another shorter 10min stop to charge up, whereas the tesla may not no need it (depending on conditions - weather, speed, etc)

to me, that's reasonable trade off for the other benefits the mach-e has over the tesla.

so when people say a road trip with EV vs ICE means 4 hrs vs 30minute for fueling, that's technically true. but if a couple of the gas stops are also stops you planned to eat/stretch, etc. the time difference may be significantly less EV vs ICE.

either way, looking forward to my 1st EV and seeing the charging network 1st hand (and see it grow!)
While I generally agree, it really depends on how long of a drive one is talking about. And at what speeds. For instance, the 800 mile trip we occasional take only requires 2 gas stops in our Escape, but ABRP shows 6 recharging stops in the Mach-e since most of the drive is 75-80 MPH.

One meal stop I'm OK with. But 6 stops and an extra 2+ hours of charging means I'll leave the Mach-e at home for that trip and take the Escape instead.
 

cometguy

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Yo Bro, this is the second very long post you have made with a whole lot of assumptions, generalizations and presumptions that may only be related to you, how you drive and how you fly. With so many assumptions it's hard (for me) to take your post in any serous way. I can't speak for you but you found it easy to speak for me and everyone else. I live in DC and not going fly to North Carolina (233 miles) or New York (225 miles) or Pittsburgh (245 miles) when I got large luxury performance vehicles and I'm not going worry about depreciation so much that I'm leaving cars at home and flying on a simple 200 mile trip.
No need to be so defensive. I'm speaking of the many luxury-car owners that I know (in person and online). I myself would rather drive to California from the east coast and fly there, but ONLY in a luxury car.
 



 









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