F150 Lightning Interesting Thoughts

mark360

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
303
Reaction score
338
Location
North Carolina
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3 AWD(OLD), Ford Raptor
Occupation
Manufacturing
Country flag
With the release of the F150 Lightning, I felt it was necessary to point out some interesting thoughts that come to mind when looking into the new truck from a F150 owner:

  • Price is exactly where it needs to be - 39k up to 90k gives the buyer plenty of choices for entry.
    • I paid 70K for my raptor, most people pay 45-55k for a 1/2 ton truck. Should give every buyer some nice choices.
  • Range is not estimated to be disappointingly low. In the base model, 230 miles is low. However, for most folks like myself I never drive more than 50 miles in a day. That is plenty with 240V home charging.
    • Ford may be playing very cautions on the range, and with the assumption that the battery pack is double in size we should be able to easily achieve better range with slower speeds or without towing long distances.
    • With 600 mile range in my Raptor, I would certainly be limiting myself if I decided to go on a long road trip in the F150 Lightning. Not too worried about that though - an EV is just not really meant for road trips especially towing.
  • Styling is exactly where it needs to be. Not too futuristic, not too old school. Keeps the traditional utility of a truck while turning it into an EV. Nice.

When I look at this truck, I think about the practicality in my own life. What if I could cut out going to the gas station? What If I could still tow my boat 40 miles to the lake every weekend to go fishing? What if I could continue to use my truck like I was before, while lowering my operating cost considerably every month? What if I could power my house with my vehicle for 3+ days, saving me $10,000 for a whole home generator?

These are questions a lot of folks will ask themselves. I think Ford did a good job on paper, and if the truck performs and sells itself on the Test drive you know the truck will easily be a home run. Every Ford dealership will have one of these for folks to check out and the questions that pop into my mind will certainly pop into theirs once they start pushing sales on these units.

Good job Ford.
 

JohnnyForensic

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
Messages
92
Reaction score
137
Location
VA, US
Vehicles
MME 4X (Ord 4/6/21, Mfg 6/27/21, Del ??)
Occupation
Digital Forensics
Country flag
With the release of the F150 Lightning, I felt it was necessary to point out some interesting thoughts that come to mind when looking into the new truck from a F150 owner:

  • Price is exactly where it needs to be - 39k up to 90k gives the buyer plenty of choices for entry.
    • I paid 70K for my raptor, most people pay 45-55k for a 1/2 ton truck. Should give every buyer some nice choices.
  • Range is not estimated to be disappointingly low. In the base model, 230 miles is low. However, for most folks like myself I never drive more than 50 miles in a day. That is plenty with 240V home charging.
    • Ford may be playing very cautions on the range, and with the assumption that the battery pack is double in size we should be able to easily achieve better range with slower speeds or without towing long distances.
    • With 600 mile range in my Raptor, I would certainly be limiting myself if I decided to go on a long road trip in the F150 Lightning. Not too worried about that though - an EV is just not really meant for road trips especially towing.
  • Styling is exactly where it needs to be. Not too futuristic, not too old school. Keeps the traditional utility of a truck while turning it into an EV. Nice.

When I look at this truck, I think about the practicality in my own life. What if I could cut out going to the gas station? What If I could still tow my boat 40 miles to the lake every weekend to go fishing? What if I could continue to use my truck like I was before, while lowering my operating cost considerably every month? What if I could power my house with my vehicle for 3+ days, saving me $10,000 for a whole home generator?

These are questions a lot of folks will ask themselves. I think Ford did a good job on paper, and if the truck performs and sells itself on the Test drive you know the truck will easily be a home run. Every Ford dealership will have one of these for folks to check out and the questions that pop into my mind will certainly pop into theirs once they start pushing sales on these units.

Good job Ford.
From a completely different perspective, I am NOT a truck guy. At all. However, I love to see what Ford brought to the table here with the F-150 Lightning. It's not crazy in its design. It has tremendous utility. The price spread, as you mentioned, means that a lot of people who might not have thought about a BEV truck before can get into one as a reasonable option. While everyone is always concerned with range anxiety and BEVs, the staggering majority of people drive less than the range allocation in a day before they can get back to their home charger. (Yes, of course there are outliers, and everyone wants to know they CAN go farther, but 350 days per year it's probably not a genuine issue for 80% of drivers.)

Again, I know little about trucks and don't like them much, but with the huge popularity of the F-150 in America, adding this to the line-up just makes a lot of sense, and it gives Ford a long run with an ICE/BEV option for either type of buyer for the years to come before BEVs might be a requirement for people to get comfortable with the option. Solidly agree with the props to Ford on this.
 

Timelessblur

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tyler
Joined
Oct 6, 2020
Messages
102
Reaction score
129
Location
Austin
Vehicles
Mach E AWD Premium Extend Range RR
Occupation
Software Developer
Country flag
I was talking with my brother a bit about the F150 lighting and my brother is a truck person and owns an F150. He said that when he replaces his truck he is going to go an electric truck. It gives him almost everything he wants. Like me he really liked the frunk in it as for him it solves one of the biggest issues with his current F150 and that is just a way to transport things that he does not want in the bed. Grocery store runs become easier as no longer does all that have to stored in the back with his kids. No longer will he have to have a mass panic when traveling with his family and it starts raining because all of their suit cases are in the bed of the trunk. Now it would be in the Front where it will be safe and dry.
I know that he though the Cyber truck was weird and he had zero interest in it. He wanted something that looked like a real truck.
Like most people he rarely drives more than 70 miles in a day and even then it might be 150 unless he is going on a road trip.

This is clearly getting the attention of F150 people/ truck people. This is providing a lot of stuff he just wanted out of an EV truck.
It also got my attention as what else is fording bring in the SUV line. I have a Mach E and love it. What else will Ford have by 2024 when I need to replace my wife's car as I do not think a Mach E is going to be what she will want. Not that I am opposed to getting another one.
 

ChasingCoral

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
7,858
Reaction score
15,260
Location
Maryland
Vehicles
GB MME FE, Leaf, Tacoma, F-150 Lightning reserved
Country flag
https://www.greencarreports.com/new...-mpg-gasoline-footprint-cleaner-with-the-grid
Ford F-150 Lightning: 85-mpg gasoline vehicle footprint, will keep getting cleaner with the grid
avatar-image-for-stephed_100440631_s.jpg

STEPHEN EDELSTEIN JUNE 11, 2021


The 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning may not be the most efficient EV, but it will have a much lower carbon footprint than the internal-combustion F-150. And a new Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) analysis helps underscore how significant than difference is.

"For over 70% of the population in the United States, driving the electric version of this vehicle should produce less than half the global warming emissions of the gasoline model," David Reichmuth, senior engineer for the UCS Clean Transportation Program, wrote in a blog post.


ford_100792116_l.jpg
2022 Ford F-150 Lightning

Ford and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) haven't released official efficiency figures for the Lightning, but the UCS estimates efficiency will be around 0.46 kilowatt-hours per mile to 0.50 kwh per mile—or 2.0-2.2 miles per kwh.

That would make it one of the least-efficient EVs in production—not counting HD heavyweights like the upcoming GMC Hummer EV—but still much better than gasoline versions of the F-150, according to Reichmuth. In California, based on power generation for its electrical grid, the Lightning should produce emissions equivalent to an 85-mpg gasoline car, he wrote.

Unlike a gasoline or diesel pickup truck, the Lightning will also keep getting cleaner over its lifetime—as the grid it's charged with transitions to more renewable sources.

pro-makes-a-great-work-truck-heres-why_100792334_l.jpg
2022 Ford F-150 Lightning Pro

To put that in perspective with a more efficient example, a 2021 Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus driven in California has emissions equivalent to a 177-mpg gasoline car, according to the UCS analysis. That's less than a fifth the emissions of the average new gasoline car, and over 65% less than even the most-efficient gasoline car, Reichmuth wrote.

The UCS has been tracking the overall carbon footprint of electric cars for a decade, and it's confirmed an important fact: Electric cars can get cleaner as the electricity grids they're charged from switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

As use of coal in electricity generation has stalled and renewable energy has gained momentum, a clear trend of lower EV emissions has emerged in the data over the years. Today, 97% of people in the U.S. live in an area where driving an EV produces fewer emissions than a 50-mpg gasoline car, according to the UCS.

However, the grid emissions in a specific area, along with purchase and operating costs of and EV, can create a lot of variables. The MIT Trancik Lab's Carboncounter.com project can help consumers navigate those numbers, and it was updated earlier this year to include most production EVs.
 

Advertisement





 


Advertisement
Top