hybrid2bev

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2019
Messages
2,122
Reaction score
5,801
Location
USA
Vehicles
2021 Mustang Mach-E Premium 4X, 2020 Explorer ST
Country flag
FORD COMMITS TO MANUFACTURING BATTERIES, TO FORM NEW JOINT VENTURE WITH SK INNOVATION TO SCALE NA BATTERY DELIVERIES
  • Ford and SK Innovation today announce they have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) for a joint venture – to be called BlueOvalSK – to manufacture battery cells and arrays in the U.S.
  • BlueOvalSK to produce approximately 60 gigawatt hours (GWh) annually with potential to expand, starting mid-decade
  • By 2030, Ford expects annual energy demand for its vehicles will be up to 140 GWh annually in North America and up to 240 GWh globally; the company has invested in and is working with a number of battery suppliers to secure capacity and scale delivery for next-generation Ford and Lincoln battery electric vehicles
  • The BlueOvalSK MoU builds on Ford’s recently announced investments to accelerate R&D of battery technology and manufacturing – including a new global battery center of excellence and an additional investment in a solid-state battery startup

DEARBORN, Mich., May 20, 2021 – Ford and SK Innovation announced today they have signed an MoU to create a joint venture – to be called BlueOvalSK – to produce approximately 60 GWh annually in traction battery cells and array modules, starting mid-decade, with potential to expand.

"This MoU is just the start; it’s a key part of our plan to vertically integrate key capabilities that will differentiate Ford far into the future,” said Jim Farley, Ford president and CEO. “We will not cede our future to anyone else.”

“We are delighted to be entering into collaboration with Ford, America’s leading and iconic automaker. Ford is one of the most active players in vehicle electrification today. We are proud to be opening this new chapter in their long history,” said Kim Jun, SK Innovation CEO & President. “Our JV with Ford will play a pivotal role in fleshing out the electric vehicle value chain in the United States, a key objective of the current U.S. administration.”

The creation of the JV is subject to definitive agreements, regulatory approvals and other conditions. Next-gen cells and arrays will be used to power several future Ford battery electric vehicles.

“Through the JV, Ford and SKI will jointly develop and industrialize battery cells at scale that are tailored to deliver optimum performance and value for our Ford and Lincoln customers,” said Lisa Drake, Ford’s North America chief operating officer. “SKI is an important partner in helping deliver batteries with better range and value for our fully electric vehicles by mid-decade.”

Ford’s global BEV plan calls for at least 240 gigawatt hours (GWh) of battery cell capacity by 2030 – roughly 10 plants’ worth of capacity. Approximately 140 GWh will be required in North America, with the balance dedicated to other key regions, including Europe and China.

“Global automakers have praised SK Innovations’ EV batteries for their safety, high capacity and long life,” said Jee Dong-seob, Head of SK Innovation’s Battery Business. “SK Innovation will be supplying batteries for the fully electric version of Ford’s legendary and best-selling F-150 pickup truck. We are thrilled to be supporting the electrification of a vehicle that represents the very best of American automaking.”

SK Innovation is a global energy conglomerate headquartered in Seoul, South Korea. The company has pioneered the development of mid- to large-size EV batteries since 1991 and has expanded its battery operations globally since 2010. SK already operates a battery plant in Commerce, Georgia, USA – serving two global OEMs – and is expanding its production capacity in the European Union and China. SK Innovation plans to become one of the world’s top three EV battery suppliers by 2025 with over 125 GWh in global production capacity.

SK Innovation has specialized in the development and commercialization of high-nickel NCM battery technology. The company developed the world’s first NCM-811 battery in 2016 and continued to innovate and to develop the world’s first Nickel 9 battery that will be mass produced in the U.S., powering Ford’s F-150 Lightning.

Ford gaining EV momentum

Ford plans to lead the electric vehicle revolution – including by delivering fifth-generation lithium ion batteries as well as preparing for the transition to solid-state batteries, which promise longer range, lower cost and safer EVs for customers.

Ford this year announced its commitment to invest at least $22 billion through 2025 to deliver connected, all-electric vehicles, building on its areas of strength, starting with EV versions of its most popular nameplates – including Mustang Mach-E, E-Transit and F-150 Lightning.

To support its longer-term battery plans, Ford is investing in battery R&D. Last month, Ford announced a new global battery center of excellence – named Ford Ion Park – to accelerate its battery and battery cell technology R&D – including future battery manufacturing.

Ford is building on nearly two decades of battery expertise by centralizing a cross-functional team of 150 experts in battery technology development, research, manufacturing, planning, purchasing, quality and finance to help Ford more quickly develop and manufacture battery cells and batteries, ultimately aiming to deliver more, even better, lower cost EVs for customers.

The Ford Ion Park team already is underway. In addition, a $185 million collaborative learning lab in Southeast Michigan that is dedicated to developing, testing and building vehicle battery cells and cell arrays opens late next year.

Earlier this month, Ford also announced it is growing its investment in Solid Power, an industry-leading producer of all-solid-state batteries for EVs. Initially investing in Solid Power in 2019, Ford is making an additional equity investment to help accelerate further development of solid-state vehicle battery technology, contributing to a $130 million Series B investment round in which the BMW Group becomes an equal equity owner with Ford.

Solid-state batteries are showing great promise. They don’t use the liquid electrolyte found in conventional lithium-ion batteries, can be lighter, with greater energy density and provide more range and lower cost. They also can be made on today’s lithium-ion battery lines, allowing Ford to reuse about 70 percent of its capital investment in lithium-ion manufacturing lines.

Proven electrification expertise

SK Innovation has a spotless health and safety record and has not registered a single EV battery-related fire.

Ford has been actively involved in battery research and electric vehicles, starting with Henry Ford and Thomas Edison. To date, the company has secured more than 2,500 U.S. patents in electrification technologies, with another 4,300 patents pending.

Since 2004, Ford has sold more than 1 million hybrids, plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles and integrated four generations of batteries into its vehicles. By year-end, the company will be manufacturing electrified vehicles and supporting technologies at more than 15 powertrain and vehicle assembly plants globally.

Ford has assembled hybrid battery packs and electric motors in Michigan since 2012. That same year, Ford invested $135 million to design, engineer and produce these components for hybrids. It included a combined 170 jobs at the Rawsonville plant to assemble batteries and VanDyke Transmission plant to assemble e-motors, plus hiring more than 50 electric vehicle engineers.


https://media.ford.com/content/ford.../ford-commits-to-manufacturing-batteries.html
Advertisement

 

DBC

Well-Known Member
First Name
Don
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
1,224
Reaction score
1,419
Location
San Diego
Vehicles
Volt ELR
Country flag
The big issue with SK Innovation was the lawsuit with LG Chem. The initial ruling banned SK Innovation from importing cells into the US for ten years, causing SK Innovation to consider withdrawing from the US market. That case was settled in the last week or two, opening up this possibility.

I think the Biden Administration leaned heavily on the companies to reach a settlement. Biden had to either endorse or vacate the ruling, and he wasn't keen on choosing between crippling the move to BEVs by enforcing it or undercutting IP protection by vacating it.

So win/win.
 

All Hat No Cattle

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
307
Reaction score
401
Location
Las Vegas
Vehicles
2016 F-150 Platinum , 2017 Edge Titanium
Country flag
DEARBORN, Mich., May 20, 2021 – Ford and SK Innovation announced today they have signed an MoU to create a joint venture – to be called BlueOvalSK – to produce approximately 60 GWh annually in traction battery cells and array modules, starting mid-decade, with potential to expand.
Can someone smarter than me please verify my numbers?

60 GWh is 60 billion watt/hours, so divide that by 1,000 to get kilowatt hours, correct?

I get 60,000,000 kilowatt hours.

Assuming 100 KWh batteries, does that get a final # of 600,000 batteries a year, from their joint plants, by 2025?

Does that seem like enough?
 

timbop

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
4,776
Reaction score
9,622
Location
New Jersey
Vehicles
2021 Mustang Mach-E (CA RT1), 2016 Dodge Durango
Occupation
Software Engineer
Country flag
Can someone smarter than me please verify my numbers?

60 GWh is 60 billion watt/hours, so divide that by 1,000 to get kilowatt hours, correct?

I get 60,000,000 kilowatt hours.

Assuming 100 KWh batteries, does that get a final # of 600,000 batteries a year, from their joint plants, by 2025?

Does that seem like enough?
1 gwh is 1000 mwh
1 mwh is 1000 kwh
1 kwh = 1000 wh

so 60,000,000,000 / 1000 = 60,000,000 watt hours
 

All Hat No Cattle

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
307
Reaction score
401
Location
Las Vegas
Vehicles
2016 F-150 Platinum , 2017 Edge Titanium
Country flag
Ok, I guess.???

But I am trying to ascertain how many batteries you can build with a 60 GWh capacity, assuming they are a 100 KWh battery? The MME has an 88 KWh battery.

DEARBORN, Mich., May 20, 2021 – Ford and SK Innovation announced today they have signed an MoU to create a joint venture – to be called BlueOvalSK – to produce approximately 60 GWh annually in traction battery cells and array modules, starting mid-decade, with potential to expand.
 

All Hat No Cattle

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
307
Reaction score
401
Location
Las Vegas
Vehicles
2016 F-150 Platinum , 2017 Edge Titanium
Country flag
Wait a minute. :)

Gigawatt hours, abbreviated as GWh, is a unit of energy representing one billion (1 000 000 000) watt hours and is equivalent to one million kilowatt hours.
So multiply that by 60, and you should get 60,000,000 kilowatt hours, not watt hours, yes?
 

timbop

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
4,776
Reaction score
9,622
Location
New Jersey
Vehicles
2021 Mustang Mach-E (CA RT1), 2016 Dodge Durango
Occupation
Software Engineer
Country flag
Ok, I guess.???

But I am trying to ascertain how many batteries you can build with a 60 GWh capacity, assuming they are a 100 KWh battery? The MME has an 88 KWh battery.
OK, I was not seeing exactly where you are going. The ER MME has a 99 kwh battery, so we'll call it 100kwh for arguments sake. That means 1 battery is 100,000 wh.

So, yes:
60,000,000,000 wh / 100,000 wh/battery = 600,000 batteries
 

RW Journey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2021
Messages
104
Reaction score
113
Location
Dallas
Vehicles
2021 Ford MME FE
Country flag
Ok, I guess.???

But I am trying to ascertain how many batteries you can build with a 60 GWh capacity, assuming they are a 100 KWh battery? The MME has an 88 KWh battery.
I believe the MME has closer to a 100kWh battery (98.8 kWh) with the amount above 88 kWh being reserved.

The Lightning is close to double the MME.

60 GWh is a reasonable start but additional capabilities will be needed if BEVs achieve mass adoption.
 

dbsb3233

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
6,494
Reaction score
7,119
Location
Colorado, USA
Vehicles
2021 Mustang Mach-E FE Red, 2013 Escape Titanium
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Assuming 100 KWh batteries, does that get a final # of 600,000 batteries a year, from their joint plants, by 2025?

Does that seem like enough?
600k BEVs sounds about right for 2025. Note that the article said 4x that by 2030. With 5M-6M annual vehicle sales, that puts Ford at about 10% BEV in 2025 and 40% in 2030. The 2nd half of the decade is where the bigger shift is likely to occur.

That doesn't count hybrids either. That will add to the total EV count (depending on who's EV definition is being used).

2025 isn't that far away. Takes a good 3+ years to develop a new vehicle model (Mach-E development started in 2017). Basically we're talking deciding by next year what BEVs they to plan to have ready for 2025. That's the Mach-E, the eTransit, and the Lightning version of the F-150 (which will only be a modest% of all F-150's). Rumors suggest a few new BEV models adding to that in the next few years (maybe an Edge-size SUV, maybe a Mach-E coup, maybe a sedan, maybe a small truck). 600k/yr total for all those sounds reasonable.
 

jeffdawgfan

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Dec 17, 2019
Messages
292
Reaction score
444
Location
Georgia, USA
Vehicles
2021 Mustang MachE AWD ER, 2019 Ram 1500 Laramie
Occupation
Retired Navy / Veterans Administration
Country flag
Ok, since on the subject of batteries...trying to wrap my head around something maybe someone with electrical expertise can enlighten me. Say you have...lets just use 12v batteries for an example. If you have (4) 12v 100 amp batteries in parallel you have 400 amps at 12 volts. What happens if you put those (4) 100 amp batteries in series. You get 48 volts but....100amps or 400 amps at 48 volts. Trying to get an idea of how they manufacture the high voltage batteries for BEV's.
 

dbsb3233

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
6,494
Reaction score
7,119
Location
Colorado, USA
Vehicles
2021 Mustang Mach-E FE Red, 2013 Escape Titanium
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Ok, since on the subject of batteries...trying to wrap my head around something maybe someone with electrical expertise can enlighten me. Say you have...lets just use 12v batteries for an example. If you have (4) 12v 100 amp batteries in parallel you have 400 amps at 12 volts. What happens if you put those (4) 100 amp batteries in series. You get 48 volts but....100amps or 400 amps at 48 volts. Trying to get an idea of how they manufacture the high voltage batteries for BEV's.
It's a combination of parallel and serial. Probably easier just to point to this passage...

https://jalopnik.com/a-look-at-the-engineering-behind-the-2021-ford-mustang-1839911078

That larger, “extended range” battery pack is shown above. It features a 98.8 kWh capacity thanks to 12 battery modules (which are not all the same size) with a combined 376 cells. The smaller “standard range” pack has only 10 modules and 288 lithium-ion cells, for a total of 75.7 kWh of capacity.

You’ll notice at the far left side of the image above that there’s actually a second tier. On extended range Mach-Es, those two modules on the second level sit under the rear seat. The standard-range cars simply have a void in that location, as the two battery sizes share the same case.

The cells, which are pouch-style lithium ion cells from LG, are arranged in “3P96S” and “4P94S” configurations, meaning the smaller pack has three parallel sets of 96 cells arranged in series, while the large pack has four parallel sets of 94 cells arranged in series. Overall system voltage is close to 400 volts.
 

All Hat No Cattle

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
307
Reaction score
401
Location
Las Vegas
Vehicles
2016 F-150 Platinum , 2017 Edge Titanium
Country flag
I believe the MME has closer to a 100kWh battery (98.8 kWh) with the amount above 88 kWh being reserved.

The Lightning is close to double the MME.

60 GWh is a reasonable start but additional capabilities will be needed if BEVs achieve mass adoption.
Yes, so if the MME and Lightning are successful, and with all the hybrids Ford has planned, I hope they have a line on more battery capacity than announced.

  • Ford announced a $29 billion investment in EVs and autonomous vehicles through 2025.
  • In the future, the majority of Ford vehicles will be electric, while traditional gasoline powertrains will be augmented with hybrid and plug-in hybrid powertrains.
 

dbsb3233

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
6,494
Reaction score
7,119
Location
Colorado, USA
Vehicles
2021 Mustang Mach-E FE Red, 2013 Escape Titanium
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
IIRC, each pouch is rated at a standard 3.7V. 96 pouches in serial produces a voltage of 355V. The SR battery has 3 sets of 96, and the ER 4 sets.

I heard Kyle say that's why when the MME charges on a 50 kW charger that it usually draws about 43 kW, because a 50 kW charger usually caps at 125A max. Since the MME runs about 11% below the standard 400V, we only get about 355V x 125A = 43 kW on those.
 

jeffdawgfan

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeff
Joined
Dec 17, 2019
Messages
292
Reaction score
444
Location
Georgia, USA
Vehicles
2021 Mustang MachE AWD ER, 2019 Ram 1500 Laramie
Occupation
Retired Navy / Veterans Administration
Country flag
IIRC, each pouch is rated at a standard 3.7V. 96 pouches in serial produces a voltage of 355V. The SR battery has 3 sets of 96, and the ER 4 sets.

I heard Kyle say that's why when the MME charges on a 50 kW charger that it usually draws about 43 kW, because a 50 kW charger usually caps at 125A max. Since the MME runs about 11% below the standard 400V, we only get about 355V x 125A = 43 kW on those.
So...if each "pouch is rated at 3.7v how amps(kw) are each pouch. I see that putting these in series gives the rated voltage...so stacking each pouch in series adds its amperage(kw) on top of the previous one? That is my lack of understanding. In parallel you add the amps(kw) to together to get total power. Do you also add the power when in series?
 
Advertisement

 
Advertisement
Top