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Ford Connected charger out of stock?

TheVirtualTim

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Tim
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Tim
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For those getting a car in late December or early January, I would not wait until mid-December to try and order an EVSE.
I'm getting the work done now -- ahead of the charger arriving. But I'm taking advantage of a reduced rate for electricity offered by my local utility for EV charging. This requires the installation of a dedicated electric meter and breaker panel.

Due to the nuances of the way the program works, they (the local electric utility) want the electrician to connect the panel to the main panel. They send their own electrician to reconnect to the new dedicated meter once they install the meter.

SO... my plan is to have the electrician install an outlet to use the Ford Mobile Charger to the 240v line ... and once the new charger arrives, I can replace the outlet with the direct-wired charger and have the local electric utility move me onto the new meter for the new rate (they wont allow any plug-in outlets ... their program requires that it be a direct-wired charger.)

But this way I'm covered with a way to charge via 240v power.

My current bet is that the charger arrives ahead of the car and I wont need the mobile charger (except maybe when traveling).
 

woody

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The Ford Connected Charge Station lists at $799 MSRP, costs $883 to purchase, pre-order only, available in December?
Clipper Creek equivalent is $899, in stock, for comparison.
I still recommend the plan ahead 15kW install, eg. the Clipper Creek HCS-80, 64 Amp, Level 2 EVSE, 240V, with 25 ft cable, if you are installing new.
25 ft cable a must for any choice.
I agree, the best case scenario is to have an EVSE operational when you drive your car home the first time.
Some other thoughts (mostly for those of us relatively new to the EV world):
I charge at level 1 whenever possible (lower mileage, overnight, etc.). My reasoning is slower speed translates to healthier batteries (level 1= healthiest; level 2, less healthy; level 3/fast charging = least healthy). I am a biologist with a few physics courses and some self taught knowledge, but I think my reasoning is sound. It is easier now that I am retired, but I did it when I was working using overnight charging. I have two EVs, so I try to do as much charging using my solar during the daylight. My utility company only pays me 5 mills/kWh which means I save a good deal by using my solar as opposed to paying the utility company 12 cents/kWh (some utility companies charge different rates at different times as suggested and is worth considering).We do not as often have both cars on the road simultaneously now which makes it easier.
Battery conditioning is better served by using the utility or solar rather than the battery. Colder weather encourages me to leave the car plugged in longer, overnight, etc.
Perhaps the future will bring improvements and these things will be of no concern.
(I finally received production schedule today for 1/31 or 2/1, depending on which screen you view)
 
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generaltso

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I'm taking advantage of a reduced rate for electricity offered by my local utility for EV charging. This requires the installation of a dedicated electric meter and breaker panel.
You may want to see if your utility company can give you the reduced rate charging through a supported charger instead of having to add another meter. I just have to give the serial number of my Chargepoint Flex to my electric company and they can monitor the usage directly through that. They also support Flo chargers.
 



 









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