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Woeo

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That's the one that comes with the car right? Have they ever announced how much the other one would be? I'm assuming you can add that into the purchase price/financing if you choose to add it at purchase?
Did you look at the attachment? There is information about two EVSE. The mobile and the permanent.
 
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The 50 in 14-50 stands for 50 Amp, so no, you can't use it on a 60A circuit (60A breaker).
It will only draw the amps that it needs. As long as the gauge of the wire fits, there’s technically no reason it won’t work as a temp measure. 14-50 is rated for 50amps, but using the mobile charger won’t pull close to that, let alone 60amps. It’s not like the 60amp breaker will broadcast 60amps to the 50amp plug as soon as it’s turned on...
 

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It will only draw the amps that it needs. As long as the gauge of the wire fits, there’s technically no reason it won’t work as a temp measure. 14-50 is rated for 50amps, but using the mobile charger won’t pull close to that, let alone 60amps. It’s not like the 60amp breaker will broadcast 60amps to the 50amp plug as soon as it’s turned on...
My comment was in response to their question about the "Ford Charger", which in context meant the Ford Connected Charger - which is a 48A charger requiring a 60A circuit. You should not have a 50A receptacle on a 60A circuit, nor could you use the Ford Connected charger with a 50A plug (it's hardwire only).

If you just want to use a 60A circuit/wiring with an L14-50 receptacle and the Ford Mobile charger, sure thing.
 

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Assuming the electrician doesn't balk at installing a 14-50 outlet onto a 60A circuit. Even though the wiring is (more than) sufficient, I don't know for sure if an electrician would be OK mis-matching an outlet like that. YMMV.

If they're OK doing that, and when it's time later to take out that outlet and hardwire the Ford Connected Charger directly, it would save a little to pre-plan the placement on the wall now. That way, the Ford Connected Charger could just be placed right over the top of the outlet box rather than needing new wiring and conduit (assuming the outlet box is flush-mount inside the wall).
I've spoken to a couple electricians for quotes, and they can use the right gage wires to support 60A. The key thing is the breaker must he 50A (or 40A for that matter) when you have the outlet installed. Once you go hardwire, you can change the breaker to 60A (assuming the panel has capacity).

+1 on the point to determine where you would want the charger to go. If you go the outlet route, they'll install a junction box for the outlet anyway, so adding a bit more conduit and some more wires shouldn't take that much time/effort. Or depending on placement you just rip out the junction box and hardwire right from there.
 

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Assuming the electrician doesn't balk at installing a 14-50 outlet onto a 60A circuit. Even though the wiring is (more than) sufficient, I don't know for sure if an electrician would be OK mis-matching an outlet like that. YMMV.
The inspector would fail the install for that
 

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Hello
I want to install the 240v wiring sooner than later so I am not caught without a charge capability. I am going to eventually put in the Ford charge station but I just want to start with a Nema 14-50 outlet. Can I put in the wiring for the 60A ford charger and for now install the 14-50 outlet and use the Ford Mobile charger that comes with the car. Sure I know it will be slower with the 14-50 outlet but will it work with the 60A wiring? Thanks for any comments.

I know several people have pointed this out already, but as it is a safety issue I feel it justifies an additional reply versus just up voting the good replies.

Please please please, do not install an outlet (or wire or anything) that is rated less than the set point of the breaker into a circuit.

If your breaker is set to try at 60 amps, it will still work if you use a plug rated for 50 BUT IT ISN'T SAFE. Sure, if everything works as intended you won't need the breaker to trip, but breakers aren't there for when everything works correctly. They are a safety device, there to protect you and your home when something goes wrong.
 

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I know several people have pointed this out already, but as it is a safety issue I feel it justifies an additional reply versus just up voting the good replies.

Please please please, do not install an outlet (or wire or anything) that is rated less than the set point of the breaker into a circuit.

If your breaker is set to try at 60 amps, it will still work if you use a plug rated for 50 BUT IT ISN'T SAFE. Sure, if everything works as intended you won't need the breaker to trip, but breakers aren't there for when everything works correctly. They are a safety device, there to protect you and your home when something goes wrong.
Not to mention, breakers (non GFCI) are pretty cheap, so no reason not to stick a 50A breaker on while using a 50A receptacle and simply replace it with a 60A breaker once you get a 48A hardwired EVSE (assuming you've installed with wire appropriate for a 60A circuit).
 

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I know several people have pointed this out already, but as it is a safety issue I feel it justifies an additional reply versus just up voting the good replies.

Please please please, do not install an outlet (or wire or anything) that is rated less than the set point of the breaker into a circuit.

If your breaker is set to try at 60 amps, it will still work if you use a plug rated for 50 BUT IT ISN'T SAFE. Sure, if everything works as intended you won't need the breaker to trip, but breakers aren't there for when everything works correctly. They are a safety device, there to protect you and your home when something goes wrong.
and it is ABSOLUTELY against electrical code.
 

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Thank you now I can plan accordingly.
Depending on how many miles you drive a day, you can also get a Grizzl-e, or various others (JuiceBox, Clipper Creek) that charge faster than the included mobile charger but still use a NEMA 14-50 outlet.
 

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Just remember there's a 30% (US) federal tax credit on any charger and/or installation cost (like a circuit/outlet) that expires at the end of 2020. So if your Mach-E won't come until 2021, you'd save money just buying and installing it now.

https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i8911.pdf
I've been thinking a lot about this. I know y'all are not accountants, but is the thought that we could do outlet only, and not install an EVSE for this year, and use the 30% tax credit just on the outlet install?

And if so, does it feel reasonable to also take that 30% tax credit on the install of a sub-panel to feed that outlet? Or just the outlet coming from the eventual panel?
 

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I've been thinking a lot about this. I know y'all are not accountants, but is the thought that we could do outlet only, and not install an EVSE for this year, and use the 30% tax credit just on the outlet install?

And if so, does it feel reasonable to also take that 30% tax credit on the install of a sub-panel to feed that outlet? Or just the outlet coming from the eventual panel?
It should be all the work required.
 

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I've been thinking a lot about this. I know y'all are not accountants, but is the thought that we could do outlet only, and not install an EVSE for this year, and use the 30% tax credit just on the outlet install?

And if so, does it feel reasonable to also take that 30% tax credit on the install of a sub-panel to feed that outlet? Or just the outlet coming from the eventual panel?
yes, you can absolutely do that
 

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My comment was in response to their question about the "Ford Charger", which in context meant the Ford Connected Charger - which is a 48A charger requiring a 60A circuit. You should not have a 50A receptacle on a 60A circuit, nor could you use the Ford Connected charger with a 50A plug (it's hardwire only).

If you just want to use a 60A circuit/wiring with an L14-50 receptacle and the Ford Mobile charger, sure thing.
Depending on how many miles you drive a day, you can also get a Grizzl-e, or various others (JuiceBox, Clipper Creek) that charge faster than the included mobile charger but still use a NEMA 14-50 outlet.
Consider also the Charge Point Flex Home charger. No need to hard wire it and it is a smart charger also.
 

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I've been thinking a lot about this. I know y'all are not accountants, but is the thought that we could do outlet only, and not install an EVSE for this year, and use the 30% tax credit just on the outlet install?

And if so, does it feel reasonable to also take that 30% tax credit on the install of a sub-panel to feed that outlet? Or just the outlet coming from the eventual panel?
Yes it sounds reasonable. Since it's up to $1000 credit, you may also consider just buying an EVSE as well..
 

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I've been thinking a lot about this. I know y'all are not accountants, but is the thought that we could do outlet only, and not install an EVSE for this year, and use the 30% tax credit just on the outlet install?

And if so, does it feel reasonable to also take that 30% tax credit on the install of a sub-panel to feed that outlet? Or just the outlet coming from the eventual panel?
As others have said, I expect that's a Yes. If audited or rejected, we could just say "I planned to get the EVSE this year too, that comes included with the car, but the car was delayed into 2021, so all I could set up in 2020 was the wiring". Which is true.

But as with all things taxes, it's up to interpretation, and the reasonableness of the IRS person you're dealing with. Anything in fuzzy territory like this is not 100% sure and consistent either way. But OTOH, the odds of the IRS even kicking it out for review in the first place are probably like 1%, I would guess. And even if it were kicked out for review, I'd be quite surprised if it weren't accepted as a valid claim.
 



 









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