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Ford's Connected Charge Station

Chief_Charlie

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I would like to get some information on the Ford Connected Charge Station mentioned in media pieces that were published in mid-October
https://media.ford.com/…/ford-introduces-north-americas-lar…
This 48 amp station is intended for installation in home garages, but I can’t find out who makes it or the 240V power requirements, etc. (I am told that I will need a 60 amp circuit for a 48 amp, 240V draw)
We’re remodeling a home and the house is almost ready for rough electrical wiring. I don’t want to have some Amazon-hired electrician come in after-the-fact and tell me they have to run a conduit down the outside of the wall from the attic to power the station.
Anyone have any information as to manufacturer, when it will be available, wiring requirements, etc?
No information has been released to Ford dealerships or Parts Departments as of yet. Thanks
 

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You do not have to use the Ford EVSE, It's standard SAE J1772 with CCS for fast charging.

The Mach-e will charge at 48A but you do not have to charge it at that rate. You can pair or set an EVSE for the capability of the circuit it is wired to. A 60A line is really heavy, gauge 6. Not handy by any means.

Your car would charge at about 28 miles per hour on a 40A EVSE. If you drive 100 miles per day and charge daily it will take 3.5 hours to replace the charge at 40A. In my area it is difficult to get them to go more than a 50A circuit ( 40A EVSE ) because they don't want to muscle a 6 gauge line. The price would be more for that.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=evse+lev...0AYXG&sprefix=EVSE,aps,220&ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_4

I have Clipper Creek EVSE.
 
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Chief_Charlie

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Whatstreet, I am a newby r.e. Electric Vehicles...... Not sure what this means:" You can pair or set an EVSE for the capability of the circuit it is wired to. A 60A line is really heavy, gauge 6. Not handy by any means. "

And here: In my area it is difficult to get them to go more than a 50A circuit ( 40A EVSE ) because they don't want to muscle a 6 gauge line. I understand the cost would be greater for a 6 gauge line... and I know that 40A is 40 amp...but what does "EVSE" stand for? The house is in the Bay Area...Santa Clara...and I haven;t approached the electrician as yet (which will be steep anyway because it is a change order!) Is this what you have?
ClipperCreek HCS-40, 240V, 32A, EV Charging Station
 

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I own ClipperCreek HCS-50, 240V, 40A EV (Max 9.6 kWh)

The E.V.S.E. (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment), is the cord that plugs into the car to connect the car to 240V AC. It is comprised of the J1772 connector with a cord to a box that houses relays and some electronics that communicates with the car about the amperage of circuit it is connected to. The other side of the box plugs into or is wired to a 240V dedicated circuit.

The EVSE a safety device. The J1772 connector is not hot when you are handling it. The relays close after the connector is plugged into the car and communication is established with the car. The car will not draw more current than the EVSE has communicated. The EVSE will switch off if a fault condition occurs. The EVSE has no power management electronics with regards to regulation. It is not the actual charger, which is in the car and provides multiple regulators for the pack.

Many EVSEs are fixed amperage so you buy the one for the line it will be used with. Others, such as JuiceBox, can be set at the time of installation to the current you want to be maximum.

The car that is plugged into the EVSE may not charge at the amperage of the EVSE if the car has a lower maximum. Say you let a family member charge their Chevrolet Bolt on your charger. It draws 32A maximum no matter haw much current the EVSE can provide.
 
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Thank you. One last question: is there a "standard" for the configuration of the plug that goes in the car; or in other words, will the Mach E work with the Clipper or other brands of chargers? (I understand the Tesla plug is not the same...)
 

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Thank you. One last question: is there a "standard" for the configuration of the plug that goes in the car; or in other words, will the Mach E work with the Clipper or other brands of chargers? (I understand the Tesla plug is not the same...)
The Mach-e uses J1772 plug which is the de-facto standard. Tesla has their own plug, but it uses the same protocol as SAE J1772 so it will work with a physical plug adapter. Tesla went Apple on us for that. The Nissan Leaf uses CHADeMO which you will see at Electrify America stations along with CCS (J1772) as they are dual cord chargers. The Leaf is the only car I know of that uses CHADeMO. Europe has legislated that CCS J1772 will be their standard and Tesla's sold in the EU have CCS J1772 for that reason.
 
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Thank you. I appreciate the time you've taken to respond to my questions.
 

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If this helps, breakers in the home can only put out 80% of the power their rated for. So 60A = 48, 50A=40, and 40A=32.

The charger they're giving us with the car can do 48A, which would need a 240V 60A breaker. This translates to 11.5KWh of charging, so about 45 miles per hour (give or take) of being plugged in.

I have 32A currently, which translates to about 25 miles per hour of being plugged in on my Bolt EV and Model X. The Bolt can't charge any more than 7.5KW (32A @ 240V) but the Tesla could take a 48A, and the Mach E will take 48A, so you can get any speed between the two, as long as you tell the charger what it's plugged into. I'm guessing you can set the Amps when you install the charger like most others.

If you're not an electrican, I recommend calling one. It cost me about $500 to put the 32A circuit in about 10 feet from my panel in the garage. I have a standard 200A home panel built in 2003. Electric companies usually will be really happy to give you more if you need it. A 48A might cost a little more, don't know, haven't done it yet. I'll wait till i get the Ford charger to find out. It's worth it if you can do it though. You get home for the day, plug in, car is ready to go in the morning. I only fast charge if I'm on a road trip.
 

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With regards to the included EVSE with the Mach-e. I think it's a mobile or maybe better referred to as portable variant. The portable EVSE charge cord is 32A and recommends a 40A circuit which is common to many dryer outlets or outlets at RV campgrounds.
 

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I have 32A currently, which translates to about 25 miles per hour of being plugged in on my Bolt EV and Model X
Which car will the Mach-e replace. The Model X or the Bolt?
 

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Here's another newbe question Ford says they are providing a mobile is it actually a charger that you can take with you or is it a broad term used for a certain type of charger?
 

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Here's another newbe question Ford says they are providing a mobile is it actually a charger that you can take with you or is it a broad term used for a certain type of charger?
It's a fancy power cord about 18-25ft long usually. Sometimes comes with multiple ends for 120v or 240v plug ins.


Which car will the Mach-e replace. The Model X or the Bolt?
The Bolt, its lease ends Mar 2021, just in time for a GT :)


With regards to the included EVSE with the Mach-e. I think it's a mobile or maybe better referred to as portable variant. The portable EVSE charge cord is 32A and recommends a 40A circuit which is common to many dryer outlets or outlets at RV campgrounds.
You are right, I misread the fine print. They'll include it in the finacing if you want as a $500 option, which is a decent price for a EVSE. You can use Amazon Services to install it, or better yet find a local electrician.
 

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You are right, I misread the fine print. They'll include it in the finacing if you want as a $500 option, which is a decent price for a EVSE. You can use Amazon Services to install it, or better yet find a local electrician.
That is a good price ClipperCreek wants something like $800 for a 48A EVSE.
 

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Here's another newbe question Ford says they are providing a mobile is it actually a charger that you can take with you or is it a broad term used for a certain type of charger?
It's a portable charging cord. It plugs into a NEMA 14-50 outlet for 240VAC charging and has an included adapter for NEMA 5-15 outlet for 120VAC (standard wall outlet).
 

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It's a portable charging cord. It plugs into a NEMA 14-50 outlet for 240VAC charging and has an included adapter for NEMA 5-15 outlet for 120VAC (standard wall outlet).

So I could plug it into a 240v out let in my garage that I use for my welder and charge the car with just the Ford provided cable?
 



 










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