mkhuffman

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I have coworkers in the Netherlands and it's fairly common there but trending down. One huge difference is in Europe to be called "All Season" the tires must have three-peak mountain snowflake. In the USA these are typically referred to as "All Weather" tires

So a Goodyear tire like this would not be sold in Europe because it would be called a "summer" tire. And much better summer tires than this are probably available.

Also, Europe has very different requirements for performance in wet, noise, and rolling resistance. I actually hope the USA adopts the EU tire label system it's sooo much better than what we do here for EV owners.
I have never heard about the difference between "All Season" and "All Weather". Tire Rack does not have a category All Weather. Is this a new thing?

1639873231346.png

 

Av8tor

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All joking aside - this image makes the whole concept make a lot of sense. Given how quiet the car is overall, reduced tire noise on the highway would be very beneficial.
1639856179016.png
I'm pretty sure Tesla tires have some sound insulation in them, I'm always reading people complaining when they have to replace them.

I'm all for a compound that can reduce the wear, since these cars are so heavy, they eat tires for lunch.
 

tuminatr

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I have never heard about the difference between "All Season" and "All Weather". Tire Rack does not have a category All Weather. Is this a new thing?

1639873231346.png
Technically no, it's a caragory that is not recognized by the RMA just like R
I have never heard about the difference between "All Season" and "All Weather". Tire Rack does not have a category All Weather. Is this a new thing?

1639873231346.png
Here is the info from discount tire, and Tire Rack. As stated by someone else it's a category not recognized by the RMA but many major tire manufactures do recognize and market tires that way. It's an all-season with enhanced winter traction essentially.

The other thing that RMA needs to do better is low rolling resistance. LRR is not binary in other words tires have different degrees of rolling resistance and the current system does a poor job of informing buyers

It is listed as a search term on TR here you go

https://tires.tirerack.com/tires/All Weather Tires

https://www.discounttire.com/learn/all-weather-tires
 
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tuminatr

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Well…they have owned Tirerack for about two weeks ;)
That's true, but I bet it's been in the works for 2+ years. That kind of stuff does not happen overnight
 

TheVirtualTim

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Everything I've ever learned about tires....

Low rolling resistance tires are less "gummy" (not as sticky to the road) but they don't wear as much. But they have less friction and are better for fuel economy.

Tires that are appropriate for rain and summer heat ... are entirely too stiff when the temps are cold and don't deal with snow well (Narrow tread channels).

Tires designed for cold weather (rubber that doesn't get as stiff in freezing temps and wider tread channels) are entirely WAY too soft in summer months ... they would offer higher rolling resistance and wear quickly if used in summer.

All-season tires try to strike a compromise ... not quite as good as proper "snow tires" in winter nor as good as proper summer tires in summer ... BUT you don't have to buy two sets of tires (likely with two sets of rims).

I use the factory All-Seasons. Why? I am a work-from-home employee. I don't have to venture out in bad weather if I don't want to. I'm in a city with excellent snow plowIng. We get a handful of bad storms each winter... but the city will generally have the roads cleared in a matter of hours. I can simply wait it out ... and the roads will easily be passable again without needing anything special.
 

tuminatr

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Everything I've ever learned about tires....

Low rolling resistance tires are less "gummy" (not as sticky to the road) but they don't wear as much. But they have less friction and are better for fuel economy.

Tires that are appropriate for rain and summer heat ... are entirely too stiff when the temps are cold and don't deal with snow well (Narrow tread channels).

Tires designed for cold weather (rubber that doesn't get as stiff in freezing temps and wider tread channels) are entirely WAY too soft in summer months ... they would offer higher rolling resistance and wear quickly if used in summer.

All-season tires try to strike a compromise ... not quite as good as proper "snow tires" in winter nor as good as proper summer tires in summer ... BUT you don't have to buy two sets of tires (likely with two sets of rims).

I use the factory All-Seasons. Why? I am a work-from-home employee. I don't have to venture out in bad weather if I don't want to. I'm in a city with excellent snow plowIng. We get a handful of bad storms each winter... but the city will generally have the roads cleared in a matter of hours. I can simply wait it out ... and the roads will easily be passable again without needing anything special.
Most of what you said was true however, technology in tires has changed as much as technology in cars.

It's true when Low rolling resistance tires first came out they were essentially really hard rubber. Today LRR is about flexibility. Why, put simply traction. Hard rubber = low traction, and that kind of defeats the purpose. Manufactures found that the largest consumption of energy is created by the contact patch. As the tire rolls down the road, it deforms to form the contact patch and then snaps back into a round shape. A tire that is flexible creates less resistance and uses less energy to deform and reform.

For cars like the Mach E LRR is very important and has a huge impact on range, especially on the highway.

To make a winter tire better in the cold manufacturers add oil that one of the reasons winter tires are poor in the wet (usually but there are ways around this too) Winter tires have lots of sypes and to help in the wet they are usually directional. The directional tread design is one of the best for removing water and that's why winter tires are directional is an inexpensive way to make up for shortcomings in the tread compound.

Most people think winter tires are about acceleration but that's not true. AWD is much more effective it is very good at getting you going but won't help much when cornering or breaking. That is where a winter or summer tire would come in depending on the season of course. Just like summer tires give you more control in the wet and dry winter tires give you more control in the snow and ice.

Some of the newer compounds to be added are silica and resins. Newer rubber compounds can add wet traction or even offer a tread compound that works in the wet but also works in much colder terms than a traditional all-season tire. Being in Detroit you have probably heard make the switch at 40 degrees. That's because the compound in all-season and summer tires becomes much less effective under 40 degrees.

The best possible scenario is to drive on a set of summers during the summer and if you get snow winters during the winter. If you can't do that then some of the new grand touring or all-weather tires become a good third option.

Some all-season tires have the winter rating it's called a three-peak mountain snowflake. Some manufacturers use marking terms like variable conditions tire, all-weather. For someone who wants only one set but lives in a climate that gets snow this is ideal.

If you are happy with the performance of your tires drive on them until you wear them out. When replacing them know for the same or in most cases less money you can do better.

These Goodyears look to be good for summer or a climate that does not get much or any snow.
 
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v8318cid

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Although I am glad to see companies who are willing to produce product to support a given market, the cynic in me is hearing "unique market = unique price" (at least as long as EVs remain outside the mainstream; clearly changing, but not there yet). Anyone remember when Michelin tried to reinvent the radial with their early '80s TRX line? Apples to oranges perhaps, but never let it be said that corporations won't find any opportunity to justify abnormally high prices.

Oh, you drive a luxury car? You need x brand tire designed for a soft, quiet ride! It only costs 200% more than a traditional radial. *insert raspberry sound* Give me the standard, cheaper radials and I'll just crank up the radio.
 

RetiredDP

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I don’t know anyone in the UK that changed summer and winter tyres.
Uhhhhhh, ever have a 15°F winter temp, and a 107°F summer temp, in the same year? From my visits to England, you don't seem to HAVE summers...

 

 
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