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As announced by Green NCAP today:

Ford Mustang Mach-E: Green and Safe Choice.

October 27, 2021

Today, Green NCAP publishes the environmental rating of Ford’s first electric SUV; the Mustang Mach-E. This clean and green five-star crossover is not, as its name might suggest, an electrified American Pony car but rather a reworked C2-platform vehicle similar to Ford’s 4th generation Puma and 3rd generation Kuga. It’s definitely a Ford, but Mustang-teased and a key competitor to Tesla’s Model Y and the Audi Q4 e-tron.

Since 2019, Green NCAP publishes overall green star ratings that summarise a vehicle’s performance in energy efficiency (Energy Efficiency Index), local pollutant emissions (Clean Air Index), and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG Index). The aim of the programme is to promote cars that cut pollutants and greenhouse gasses and, at the same time, operate at lowest fossil fuel consumption and/or highest energy efficiency under real-world conditions.

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Being full electric, the Mach-E scored maximum points for the Clean Air Index and the Greenhouse Gas Index as emissions at the tailpipe are zero, showing its near zero impact on the local environment. Some energy is lost during the WLTC+ cold ambient temperature test (-7°C) and the high-load, motorway-like, BAB130 test, resulting in a 9.4 out of 10 score on Energy Efficiency. The worldwide-harmonised Light-duty-vehicle Test Cycle (WLTC) is a laboratory test where the car is started from cold. The higher the efficiency, the more kilometres can be driven on the same battery charge and the more economical the driving.

Overall, the MACH-E emerges with a maximum 5 star rating, a recommended green choice for consumers.

The Mach-E was also tested by Green NCAP’s partner programme Euro NCAP and also scored a maximum 5-star safety rating.

For full results, visit www.greenncap.com.

 

ARK

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I think this is great. I don’t think they assess vehicles for local particulate pollution from non-engine sources (i.e. from tires and brake pads), but I bet the Mach-E performs better than most BEVs in terms of the least possible particulate emissions because of how narrow the tires are and the fact that it is impossible to avoid regen braking even when going through the brake pedal because of the blended braking.

I learned about particulate emissions pollution from electric cars through the final section in this Los Angeles Times article a few years ago, which said the following:

Don't count on electric cars to eliminate the problem

Cars and trucks keep getting cleaner, but don’t count on electric vehicles bringing an end to traffic-related health problems.

Switching to zero-emission vehicles only gets rid of tailpipe-generated pollution. It does nothing to reduce non-exhaust pollutants, including dust from brake pads and tires that contains toxic metals, rubber and other compounds that are kicked up into the air.

Scientists trying to pinpoint the most harmful agents in traffic pollution are just beginning to study the health effects of those non-tailpipe pollutants.

“The switch to electric vehicles will certainly reduce the public’s exposure to engine-related emissions,” said Ed Avol, a professor of preventive medicine at USC. “But this other kind of pollution generated by the frictional forces of tires and brakes and from lubricating oils is likely to remain in some form for years to come.”
 

ChasingCoral

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I think this is great. I don’t think they assess vehicles for local particulate pollution from non-engine sources (i.e. from tires and brake pads), but I bet the Mach-E performs better than most BEVs in terms of the least possible particulate emissions because of how narrow the tires are and the fact that it is impossible to avoid regen braking even when going through the brake pedal because of the blended braking.

I learned about particulate emissions pollution from electric cars through the final section in this Los Angeles Times article a few years ago, which said the following:

Don't count on electric cars to eliminate the problem

Cars and trucks keep getting cleaner, but don’t count on electric vehicles bringing an end to traffic-related health problems.

Switching to zero-emission vehicles only gets rid of tailpipe-generated pollution. It does nothing to reduce non-exhaust pollutants, including dust from brake pads and tires that contains toxic metals, rubber and other compounds that are kicked up into the air.

Scientists trying to pinpoint the most harmful agents in traffic pollution are just beginning to study the health effects of those non-tailpipe pollutants.

“The switch to electric vehicles will certainly reduce the public’s exposure to engine-related emissions,” said Ed Avol, a professor of preventive medicine at USC. “But this other kind of pollution generated by the frictional forces of tires and brakes and from lubricating oils is likely to remain in some form for years to come.”
That misses the fact that regenerative braking dramatically reduces production of brake dust particulates.
 

SpaceEVDriver

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That misses the fact that regenerative braking dramatically reduces production of brake dust particulates.
Not only that...
The science paper the LA Times presumably used to generate their call-list doesn't say what they pretend it says. All emphasis mine.
The LA Times claims, "Switching to zero-emission vehicles only gets rid of tailpipe-generated pollution. It does nothing to reduce non-exhaust pollutants, including dust from brake pads and tires that contains toxic metals, rubber and other compounds that are kicked up into the air."

That's not what the research paper said. It said, "Non-tailpipe emissions constituted ~8%, 11% and 18% of PM0.2, PM2.5 and PM2.5–10, respectively, with important exposure and health implications....<snip>...Vehicle emissions result in a complex mix of air pollutants with both tailpipe and non-tailpipe components. As mobile source regulations lead to decreased tailpipe emissions, the relative contribution of non-tailpipe traffic emissions to near-roadway exposures is increasing."

 

 
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