How will Ford get over ‘Range Anxiety’

Popeye

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From everything I’ve read, range anxiety is the biggest hurdle to convert ICE customers over to BEV’s.

According to the great work by buzznwood to get the specs and info, the GT will have the SR battery with 236 miles of range, in order to achieve the performance of 0-60 in less than 3.5 seconds. Given that li-ion batteries charge quickest to 80%, I assume that the 47 miles in 10 minutes is based on that 80%. So it would take approx 40 minutes at a charging station to get 188.8 miles. Is that good enough?

To take this even further, I read this article, https://arstechnica.com/cars/2019/11/living-with-range-anxiety-two-weeks-with-the-jaguar-i-pace/ , which talks about home charging for the I-Pace. On a 120v outlet it took 12 hours to add 28 miles. On a 240v charger it took 4 hours to add 34 miles. Ford’s solution to this is offering a service to install a 240v charger to your home. I would only assume will cost a few thousand, but will be totally necessary in order to use this as an everyday driver.

A quick search shows average commuter 16 miles each way to work. 32 miles total. 28 miles with 1hours of charging on a 120v outlet isn’t going to cover that. God forbid you have to go to the grocery store or go out to dinner. A night out will not only eat into the miles used, it also will eat into charging time.

So is the solution stopping at a supercharger every day for 10 minutes to get the 47 miles you need daily? Or do you go to a supercharger once a week and spend 40 minutes there to get 189 miles added? Seems like ‘Range Anxiety’ is real. Filling an ICE vehicle takes a few minutes a week.

Do you all think Fords in-home solution, which adds to the cost of Mach E, resolves this anxiety? Or will people be willing to spend an hour a week at supercharger? I feel Ford will need to include the in-home 240v charger installation free as an incentive to get the masses to trade in ICE vehicles for the Mach E.
 

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From everything I’ve read, range anxiety is the biggest hurdle to convert ICE customers over to BEV’s.

According to the great work by buzznwood to get the specs and info, the GT will have the SR battery with 236 miles of range, in order to achieve the performance of 0-60 in less than 3.5 seconds. Given that li-ion batteries charge quickest to 80%, I assume that the 47 miles in 10 minutes is based on that 80%. So it would take approx 40 minutes at a charging station to get 188.8 miles. Is that good enough?

To take this even further, I read this article, https://arstechnica.com/cars/2019/11/living-with-range-anxiety-two-weeks-with-the-jaguar-i-pace/ , which talks about home charging for the I-Pace. On a 120v outlet it took 12 hours to add 28 miles. On a 240v charger it took 4 hours to add 34 miles. Ford’s solution to this is offering a service to install a 240v charger to your home. I would only assume will cost a few thousand, but will be totally necessary in order to use this as an everyday driver.

A quick search shows average commuter 16 miles each way to work. 32 miles total. 28 miles with 1hours of charging on a 120v outlet isn’t going to cover that. God forbid you have to go to the grocery store or go out to dinner. A night out will not only eat into the miles used, it also will eat into charging time.

So is the solution stopping at a supercharger every day for 10 minutes to get the 47 miles you need daily? Or do you go to a supercharger once a week and spend 40 minutes there to get 189 miles added? Seems like ‘Range Anxiety’ is real. Filling an ICE vehicle takes a few minutes a week.

Do you all think Fords in-home solution, which adds to the cost of Mach E, resolves this anxiety? Or will people be willing to spend an hour a week at supercharger? I feel Ford will need to include the in-home 240v charger installation free as an incentive to get the masses to trade in ICE vehicles for the Mach E.
I thought you only needed to install a 240v outlet (not a special charger) to get the 22 mph charging at home. Do we really think its going to cost several thousand dollars for an electrician to install a 240 volt outlet (Serious question, I haven't ever had a need for an electrician to come out and do work). I do know Ford will offer a special home fast charger that will add 32 mph, and I could see that costing in the thousands.
 
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I thought you only needed to install a 240v outlet (not a special charger) to get the 22 mph charging at home. Do we really think its going to cost several thousand dollars for an electrician to install a 240 volt outlet (Serious question, I haven't ever had a need for an electrician to come out and do work). I do know Ford will offer a special home fast charger that will add 32 mph, and I could see that costing in the thousands.
I think potentially it could cost thousands. Older homes have 120v service line. Newer homes have a 240v service line. For older homes, I would assume you would have to upgrade your service line to a 240v line. On top of all that, amperes comes in to plat, which I believe is basically how much can go through the line. I’m not an electrician, but seems like a lot of $$ to me.
 

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I think potentially it could cost thousands. Older homes have 120v service line. Newer homes have a 240v service line. For older homes, I would assume you would have to upgrade your service line to a 240v line. On top of all that, amperes comes in to plat, which I believe is basically how much can go through the line. I’m not an electrician, but seems like a lot of $$ to me.

Interesting. I know that Ford is partnering with Amazon for installs. I wonder if people will get discounted pricing due to volume. I know the electricians will be third party, but maybe Amazon will subsidize a portion due to the contract with Ford.
 

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A 240v outlet will not take thousands to install. Electric dryers are 240v and in many homes. The electrician would do something similar in the garage.
 

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I would budget a $1,000 for a 240V charger and that includes installation. I believe Ford will allow you to add it to the loan (not sure about a lease) if you want.

I have a Honda Clarity PHEV with a small battery. It took about 8 hours to fully charge from zero on 120V. I installed a 240V so it only takes 2 1/2 hours from zero. Charging an EV for daily use (assuming a typical commute, YMMV), is very much like charging your phone or other like device. You use it all day and then charge it overnight for the next day's use.

The only time you have to worry about finding a public charging station is for long trips. Tesla knew that and solved it by building out their network. Ford is trying to do the same with teaming up with Electrify America. Apps like PlugShare are also a big help in finding public stations.
 

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A 240v outlet will not take thousands to install. Electric dryers are 240v and in many homes. The electrician would do something similar in the garage.
That is what I was thinking, but didn't want to put my foot in my mouth. I feel like that most people will install the outlet in their garage and many probably have their breaker box in their garage as well. From my very limited research, the closer the outlet is to the breaker box, the cheaper it is to install.

I wonder if EVs will try and standardize the side of the vehicle where the charging point is located. It may make a difference where folks get their outlets installed.
 

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Yes a closer breaker box will result in less wire being run and less cost.
 
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Thank you. @stmache and @Airflow! That is great info!

So the answer is yes it solves the range anxiety in terms of daily usage. At least for me that resolves my anxiety. The article I posted got me worried, since it took 12 hours for only 28 miles. This means for a minor cost, you can potentially add 128 miles in 12 hours at home.
 

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Also, just to think about, typical overnight charging is at off peak times, so cheaper electric bills (if your power company does peak times).
 

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Thank you. @stmache and @Airflow! That is great info!

So the answer is yes it solves the range anxiety in terms of daily usage. At least for me that resolves my anxiety. The article I posted got me worried, since it took 12 hours for only 28 miles. This means for a minor cost, you can potentially add 128 miles in 12 hours at home.
I might be doing bad math, but I believe it’s more than that. The 240 volt charger supposedly gets you 22 mph. Times that by 12 and you get 264 miles added in a 12 hour period.
 

F91

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I think potentially it could cost thousands. Older homes have 120v service line. Newer homes have a 240v service line. For older homes, I would assume you would have to upgrade your service line to a 240v line. On top of all that, amperes comes in to plat, which I believe is basically how much can go through the line. I’m not an electrician, but seems like a lot of $$ to me.
If you are referring to the source feed from the transformer, well over 95% of homes in the US have 240 v services. You can't even buy a duplex (2-wire-120V) service bigger than #6 aluminum , which doesn't carry the amps for whole house use.
 

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I might be doing bad math, but I believe it’s more than that. The 240 volt charger supposedly gets you 22 mph. Times that by 12 and you get 264 miles added in a 12 hour period.
Typically, I doubt on most days people drive over 50 miles. Of course, that changes daily and more so on days off like weekends. Most of the time, you are only "topping off" the battery and not from a near zero charge. Charge times will vary. You will also be able to schedule when the car charges to take advantage of those off peak electric rates. Many utilities even have special rates for EV owners. Check with yours to see if they do.
 

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Typically, I doubt on most days people drive over 50 miles. Of course, that changes daily and more so on days off like weekends. Most of the time, you are only "topping off" the battery and not from a near zero charge. Charge times will vary. You will also be able to schedule when the car charges to take advantage of those off peak electric rates. Many utilities even have special rates for EV owners. Check with yours to see if they do.
I, unfortunately, drive around 100 miles a day (drop kids off, then head to work). Luckily, there is EV charging in my parking garage.
 

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I would budget a $1,000 for a 240V charger and that includes installation. I believe Ford will allow you to add it to the loan (not sure about a lease) if you want.

I have a Honda Clarity PHEV with a small battery. It took about 8 hours to fully charge from zero on 120V. I installed a 240V so it only takes 2 1/2 hours from zero. Charging an EV for daily use (assuming a typical commute, YMMV), is very much like charging your phone or other like device. You use it all day and then charge it overnight for the next day's use.

The only time you have to worry about finding a public charging station is for long trips. Tesla knew that and solved it by building out their network. Ford is trying to do the same with teaming up with Electrify America. Apps like PlugShare are also a big help in finding public stations.
In advance of our first EV purchase, I got the 240V plug put-in my a certified electrician. It cost me less than $200.
 



 








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