Ionity launches new pricing structure based on kWh

hybrid2bev

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timbop

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From what I understand, in order for EA to charge by the kwhr many states would need to change their regulations regarding EA being qualified as an electric utility. I don't think that will happen any time soon, and even if it did they would then be subject to most state's pricing restrictions on utility rates.
 

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California recently passed a law requiring EV chargers to "charge" (yeah, I know) by the kWh. Actually it's a good idea due to tapering of the charge rate....
 

silverelan

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California recently passed a law requiring EV chargers to "charge" (yeah, I know) by the kWh. Actually it's a good idea due to tapering of the charge rate....
They'll need to figure out a way to incentivize customers to maximize their charge rate then leave If drivers are only charged for the kWh, then they'll linger for that extra energy to go from 80->100% because why not.
 
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hybrid2bev

hybrid2bev

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They'll need to figure out a way to incentivize customers to maximize their charge rate then leave If drivers are only charged for the kWh, then they'll linger for that extra energy to go from 80->100% because why not.
Why not set the pricing by SOC and kWh? Lower SOC = normal rates per kWh, then as the SOC increases a higher price kicks in. So the price per kWh is $X until 80% SOC. Over 80% SOC the price per kWh is $XX.
 

eager2own

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California recently passed a law requiring EV chargers to "charge" (yeah, I know) by the kWh. Actually it's a good idea due to tapering of the charge rate....
To clarify, although the law did just pass, it only imposes that requirement for new Level 2 stations installed 2021 and after and for new DCFC stations installed 2023 and after. Those installed before those deadlines are grandfathered in without the rule until 2031 and 2033.
 

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They'll need to figure out a way to incentivize customers to maximize their charge rate then leave If drivers are only charged for the kWh, then they'll linger for that extra energy to go from 80->100% because why not.
Why not? Because DCFC are mainly used for road trips, and people want to be back on the road, not sitting at a charger that's now become "slow".
 

silverelan

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Why not? Because DCFC are mainly used for road trips, and people want to be back on the road, not sitting at a charger that's now become "slow".
You'd think that, except that's not what actually happens. Just look at the Supercharger congestion where you've got people lingering and not moving on. Congestion is amplified by owners with unlimited supercharging privileges who will camp on a stall for over an hour.
 

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€0.79 ($0.88) per kWh?? Holy crap, that's expensive. Even for Europe.

One more reason to consider dedicating the BEV to home-charge radius only.
 

theothertom

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You'd think that, except that's not what actually happens. Just look at the Supercharger congestion where you've got people lingering and not moving on. Congestion is amplified by owners with unlimited supercharging privileges who will camp on a stall for over an hour.
I don't think many people "linger" at superchargers. It's such a time waster. Yes, sometimes SC's are backed up, but that's generally in high travel times and because there are so many Teslas.
 

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I don't think many people "linger" at superchargers. It's such a time waster. Yes, sometimes SC's are backed up, but that's generally in high travel times and because there are so many Teslas.
Gotcha. So you don't think charging by the minute would motivate drivers to move on?
 

timbop

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Gotcha. So you don't think charging by the minute would motivate drivers to move on?
It would me. Even if I am stopped to eat dinner, incurring $.70/min to slowly top off above 80% I probably won't do it.
 

dbsb3233

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I don't think many people "linger" at superchargers. It's such a time waster. Yes, sometimes SC's are backed up, but that's generally in high travel times and because there are so many Teslas.
That's logical, although I suspect there are some% that use that time to go eat at a restaurant. And that'll produce some delays getting back to the vehicle at the right time.

That's another thing I look at with just a little skepticism when people say "Use that time to have lunch". Certainly true in many cases, but that's not without it's flaws too. If there's a fast food restaurant right in the lot, that's probably fine (as long as you're happy eating that fast food). But many times the closest (acceptable) restaurant will be blocks away. And could be a sit-down restaurant where you could be stuck with a lengthier meal, slow service, etc. All while the vehicle is sitting there for 20 minutes longer than it needs to be, blocking it for the next person.

Once people leave their vehicles unattended, the odds of getting tied up with something and losing time increase significantly.
 
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