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DBC

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I previously stated that Tesla is the efficiency leader and someone asked for proof. The proof is that Tesla has the highest MPGe according to the federal agency that measures that stuff. Since the charger is part of the vehicle....the MPGe figures are valid. That measures vehicle efficiency. Even if you remove charger losses because you think that will make a difference......it doesn't. The standings on this list would remain the same.
...
I can do it here for those that are interested....
Based on the window sticker posted at the start of this thread: City Range is 288 miles. Highway range is 252. Vehicle appears to be AWD Extended range model.

My expectation for real world range based on my driving habits/usage is 290 miles city and 245 highway. It's just an expectation based on what I know so far to date. I really won't know until I get my car and can put some miles on it.
People usually mean vehicle efficiency when they say efficiency but agreed the ranks won't change. However, it's possible that the Porsche Taycan is more efficient at high speeds than the Tesla Model S though the EPA numbers say the opposite. If that is true it's because the EPA tests won't capture some of the tech used by the Taycan. This happens in the ICE world as well. For example the EPA tests don't capture the efficiency of start/stop systems. To address this I believe there is an adjustment to the numbers.

On the range numbers, keep in mind that the combined range is something like 2 parts City and one part Highway (mostly US06). So the Highway range would be 246 miles, which is quite close to your 245 mile estimate. Hopefully you/we won't be disappointed since that's my expectation as well.
 

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If you believed what you claim, you would have ordered a SR.
This brings up an important point which people are missing so I'm going to respond. The fact is that I did EXACTLY what I should have done if I believed my claim. Going with SR reduces the charging rate from 150 kW to 115 kW. If charging rate is the important factor, you want to avoid SR, not necessarily because of range but because of the charging rate. The real test, which wasn't on the table, would be if SR charged at 300 kW and the ER at 150 kW. Not realistic of course but that would be the test.
[/QUOTE]

Seriously? SR - 115 and ER - 150kW? Could Ford do anything more offensive to the buyers of their "less expensive" (just measly $47K, right?) than this? Is there any other company that did something like that? Did they artificially add that "option" for smaller batteries to "encourage" additional $5K spending? One more opportunity for my Tesla friend to have fun of my Ford "Mustang?!" selection - not only 230 miles but now only 115 kW. Perfect, just perfect...
 

timbop

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This brings up an important point which people are missing so I'm going to respond. The fact is that I did EXACTLY what I should have done if I believed my claim. Going with SR reduces the charging rate from 150 kW to 115 kW. If charging rate is the important factor, you want to avoid SR, not necessarily because of range but because of the charging rate. The real test, which wasn't on the table, would be if SR charged at 300 kW and the ER at 150 kW. Not realistic of course but that would be the test.
Seriously? SR - 115 and ER - 150kW? Could Ford do anything more offensive to their clients than this? Is there any other company that did something like that? Did they artificially add that "option" for smaller batteries to "encourage" additional $5K spending? One more opportunity for my Tesla friend to have fun of my Ford "Mustang?!" selection - not only 230 miles but now only 115 kW. Perfect, just perfect...
[/QUOTE]

Tesla does EXACTLY the same thing with the model 3. The smaller battery on the SR+ maxes out at 170kw, the LR at 250. It has to do with how the additional cells are wired in parallel to the others.

If your only concern is what your Tesla buddy will say....
 

timbop

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In your rant that was all you mentioned. The key point in my response was that it is an electrical characteristic of the way Tesla and Ford wire in the additional cells, and has nothing to do with Ford trying to screw you.
 

RonTCat

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This brings up an important point which people are missing so I'm going to respond. The fact is that I did EXACTLY what I should have done if I believed my claim. Going with SR reduces the charging rate from 150 kW to 115 kW. If charging rate is the important factor, you want to avoid SR, not necessarily because of range but because of the charging rate. The real test, which wasn't on the table, would be if SR charged at 300 kW and the ER at 150 kW. Not realistic of course but that would be the test.
Seriously? SR - 115 and ER - 150kW? Could Ford do anything more offensive to the buyers of their "less expensive" (just measly $47K, right?) than this? Is there any other company that did something like that? Did they artificially add that "option" for smaller batteries to "encourage" additional $5K spending? One more opportunity for my Tesla friend to have fun of my Ford "Mustang?!" selection - not only 230 miles but now only 115 kW. Perfect, just perfect...
[/QUOTE]
Despite your offense, it is really hard to violate physical laws. If 1 battery array can absorb ~37kW, your car has 3 arrays but your friends has 4, he can charge at 37*4 and you can charge at 37*3.
 

supertramp

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In your rant that was all you mentioned. The key point in my response was that it is an electrical characteristic of the way Tesla and Ford wire in the additional cells, and has nothing to do with Ford trying to screw you.
It's just harder and harder to justify quite expensive selection of "premium" Mach E based only on look. KInd of frustrating a little bit. I guess I wait until people start driving real Mach Es and share what they find out else. I suspect as it is first Mustang EV, there will be more surprise" ahead - hopefully more positive ones.
 

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Seriously? SR - 115 and ER - 150kW? Could Ford do anything more offensive to the buyers of their "less expensive" (just measly $47K, right?) than this? Is there any other company that did something like that? Did they artificially add that "option" for smaller batteries to "encourage" additional $5K spending? One more opportunity for my Tesla friend to have fun of my Ford "Mustang?!" selection - not only 230 miles but now only 115 kW. Perfect, just perfect...
Generally speaking, the charge and discharge rates are determined by battery size. As always......it comes down to thermal management. The larger the battery, the greater the potential rate of charge/discharge. It has been like this for quite some time across most all manufacturers. The same reason why the extended range battery is able to make more horsepower is the same reason why it can charge quicker on DCFC. I don't think that Ford set the charge rate to get people to purchase the more expensive battery. I think Ford is providing choices so each consumer can select what works best for their needs.

The Hummer EV has a clever strategy and if successful it might be adopted by other manufacturers. It is able to split the battery pack into two equal units and 're-wire' them to be in series so they can accept a very high charge rate. Then once charging is done the wiring goes back to parallel packs and the vehicle drives away.
 

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This brings up an important point which people are missing so I'm going to respond. The fact is that I did EXACTLY what I should have done if I believed my claim. Going with SR reduces the charging rate from 150 kW to 115 kW. If charging rate is the important factor, you want to avoid SR, not necessarily because of range but because of the charging rate. The real test, which wasn't on the table, would be if SR charged at 300 kW and the ER at 150 kW. Not realistic of course but that would be the test.
Seriously? SR - 115 and ER - 150kW? Could Ford do anything more offensive to the buyers of their "less expensive" (just measly $47K, right?) than this? Is there any other company that did something like that? Did they artificially add that "option" for smaller batteries to "encourage" additional $5K spending? One more opportunity for my Tesla friend to have fun of my Ford "Mustang?!" selection - not only 230 miles but now only 115 kW. Perfect, just perfect...
[/QUOTE]



It is NOT about peak power but about average...
3E6A2D4C-DA64-4E54-B819-A0F22451E86B.png


C4A3A985-C974-4169-A6EC-426A88EEB63C.jpeg
 

stmache

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macchiaz-o

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It's too early to be worrying about 115 kW versus 150 kW charging rates. We don't even know the charge curves.

It's unfair to assume that the ER-equipped Mach-E will charge from 10-80% at a rate 30% faster than the SR-equipped Mach-E. YES, it may be a little faster, but we don't know by how much.

And regardless, I will be 100% completely okay with my standard range Mach-E with its maximum DC charge rate of 115 kW. If you are road tripping a lot and will be using lots of high speed chargers, then I can possibly understand the benefit of paying an extra $5,000 for a higher rate. But for myself, it is not worth it.
 

timbop

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It's just harder and harder to justify quite expensive selection of "premium" Mach E based only on look. KInd of frustrating a little bit. I guess I wait until people start driving real Mach Es and share what they find out else. I suspect as it is first Mustang EV, there will be more surprise" ahead - hopefully more positive ones.
Hmm.

Tesla M3 SR+ with 260 mi range and non-white color is $39k
MME SR RWD with 230 mi range and any color you want is $40k after the fed rebate
Tesla M3 SR+ add-on for FSD is $10k
MME add-on for handsfree is $500

So comparing price for price the Mach E MAY have 30 miles less range, but is a CUV with "almost free" self driving. Comparing the much cheaper (after fed rebate) SR RWD MME to a LR MY is your mistake. If you wanted to compete with your buddy's MY you should have ordered the ER premium for $5k less than the Y after fed rebates.
 

trutolife27

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It's just harder and harder to justify quite expensive selection of "premium" Mach E based only on look. KInd of frustrating a little bit. I guess I wait until people start driving real Mach Es and share what they find out else. I suspect as it is first Mustang EV, there will be more surprise" ahead - hopefully more positive ones.
the Mache is not in the same segment as model 3. Ford does not have an EV to compare to the model 3.

Model y and Mache are the same segments. I already broke down prices on another thread and really the mache is cheaper than the model y. Not counting the 7,500 either. Have a nice day. 🚗 ☕ 🦄
 

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How strong is the brake regen in the Mach-E, 75 kw, 100 kW?
 

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How strong is the brake regen in the Mach-E, 75 kw, 100 kW?
No idea. I didnt see anything on the screen that showed that figure. Might be there....just didnt see it.

To me, the Unbridled mode felt less aggressive than Tesla Model 3 which I was happy to see because I felt the Tesla was too much.

I presume we are talking about 1 Pedal mode and how it feels when lifting off the accelerator pedal.....correct?
 



 









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