Wildthing

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Updated with good explanation and graph by @Scufflegrit

I graphed the info we know. It assumes flat torque until the peak power is reached, and then it assumes power remains constant. This is oversimplification, but we don't know the motor efficiency curves or whether the motor power drops above a certain speed.

The vehicle speed in the graph uses the tire size we've seen on the Premium, and then I estimated the gear reduction (Ford provided a range in one of their interviews). Around town at low speeds the AWD's will be the liveliest independent of battery. At highways speeds though the battery choice comes into play and is probably due to the additional current that can be supplied by the larger battery. The standard range models probably won't be too exciting on the highway.

Mustang Mach-E Power Torque Curve Dyno.png

Original post/question:

I must admit I do not understand power and torque figure announced for different versions. I found nothing about this and I’m surprised it hasn’t been discussed.

I tought that the relation between power and torque was pretty consistent for EV engine since they always produce 100% torque. Therefore horsepower should be function of engine speed and the relation should be pretty linear among the power curve. Correct me if I’m wrong here.

There seems to have some inconsistencies in the spec sheet (US version). I exclude the GT from that comparison.
1) target torque for AWD is 417 lb-ft
2) target torque for RWD is 306 lb-ft
3) target horsepower for standard range battery is 255 HP, AWD and RWD
4) target horse power for AWD with long range battery is 332 HP
5) target horse power for RWD with long range battery is 282 HP

How can a RWD long range car can get more horsepower (332 vs 255 HP) than a standard range AWD car with much less torque (306 vs 417 lb-ft).

How can all AWD cars get 417 lb-ft of torque while getting 3 different target power (255-282-332).

I could add that 0-60 target also seems inconsistent to power and torque. Since they are just estimates, I’ll wait for final numbers.

Any comments or explanation about this?
 
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JamieGeek

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Well first of all: Torque is 100% at 0 RPM it drops from there the faster the motor goes.

2nd: Power & torque from an electric motor is also dependent on how much current the battery can deliver. Thus the larger battery will give a bit more power than the smaller battery.
 

Scufflegrit

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I graphed the info we know. It assumes flat torque until the peak power is reached, and then it assumes power remains constant. This is oversimplification, but we don't know the motor efficiency curves or whether the motor power drops above a certain speed.

The vehicle speed in the graph uses the tire size we've seen on the Premium, and then I estimated the gear reduction (Ford provided a range in one of their interviews). Around town at low speeds the AWD's will be the liveliest independent of battery. At highways speeds though the battery choice comes into play and is probably due to the additional current that can be supplied by the larger battery. The standard range models probably won't be too exciting on the highway.

Mustang Mach-E Power Torque Curve Dyno.png
 
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ChasingCoral

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Also note that the Extended Range (ER) battery charges faster than the Standard Range (SR) battery. It’s quite possible the discharge rate, and therefore maximum torque, are higher on the ER than the SR due to more robust “wiring”.
 

Bluestang50

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The missing component that explains everything could be a "DC/DC boost converter, used in some EVs in situations in which the vehicle needs to trade torque for horsepower, such as during hard acceleration at highway speeds"
 
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