New Material Allows Lithium-Ion Batteries to Maintain Full Capacity for 5 Years

trutolife27

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New Material Allows Lithium-Ion Batteries to Maintain Full Capacity for 5 Years
It's called bis-imino-acenaphthenequinone-paraphenylene (BP) copolymer.

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By Matthew Humphries
March 8, 2021
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One of the major limiting factors of rechargeable batteries today is how quickly their capacity can degrade. After just a year of regularly recharging a lithium-ion battery, it can't get close to its full capacity anymore. However, a new material holds the promise of changing the situation and allowing full capacity charges for five or more years.
As EurekaAlert reports, a team of scientists working at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) has been looking specifically at the negative terminals inside lithium-ion batteries. They use graphite anodes, but also require a binder material; otherwise the graphite would simply fall apart inside the battery.

Today, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is used as the binder material, but its performance isn't great. After just 500 charge-discharge cycles, typically only 65% capacity can be achieved in a battery using PVDF. We've all experienced this when our smartphone battery no longer lasts a full day like it did when the phone was new, but such experiences could soon be a thing of the past.

The JAIST team discovered a new, and almost unpronounceable new binder material called bis-imino-acenaphthenequinone-paraphenylene (BP) copolymer. The good news is, BP allows a battery to maintain 95% capacity for more than 1,700 charge-discharge cycles. In other words, it allows a lithium-ion battery to be fully recharged daily for almost five years, and possibly even longer. That's according to Professor Noriyoshi Matsumi, who led the study.

According to Matsumi, "The realization of durable batteries will help in the development of more reliable products for long-term use. This will encourage consumers to purchase more expensive battery-based assets like electric vehicles, which will be used for many years." It's certainly great news for our smartphones, tablets, and laptops, but even better news for electric vehicles, where the lifespan of the batteries they rely on is so important, as is the range they offer.
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SteelMach

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It's called bis-imino-acenaphthenequinone-paraphenylene (BP) copolymer.
Man I hope I never get this on a spelling test :p

Super promising though! While battery longevity isn't nearly as bad as a lot of people think, it certainly can always get better. This could also improve the remarketing potential of end-of-life batteries as well. When a Mach-E is worn out at 200k or whatever years from now, but the batteries are still kicking, we can just take the battery pack out, hang it on the garage wall, hook it in as home backup, and scrap the rest of the car.
 

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There a number of promising technologies that make current batteries look positively outdated. You see the announcements every day. The problem is commercializing them is hard. Like startup sucking up all the venture capital/taking all your R&D budget for the next 10 years hard. And a lot of times these technologies can't easily be commercialized so they will die on the vine until they can be OR you will find them in exotic/specialized products that the benefit outweighs the costs.

 

 
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