Advertisement



One Pedal driving Mach-E? Are you a fan?

Are you a fan of one-pedal driving?


  • Total voters
    87

JamieGeek

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
615
Reaction score
580
Location
Southeastern Michigan
Website
spareelectrons.wordpress.com
Vehicles
Bolt EV, Thor Axis, former C-Max Energi, former Focus Electric
Country flag
He didnt do the PHEV training wheel program like I did. He went straight from ICE to BEV. It has been about 3 months now since he bought his M3. The day he gave me a ride it was about 105 out and the A/C struggled to keep the cabin at a comfortable temp for me. My FFE does a much better job by comparison. Today's high was 117 and very comfortable inside the car with climate control set at 74 degrees. Doesnt use much power either. The weekend before I converted my order, my wife and I test drove a Model Y and the A/C was not as effective as we hoped so that was the final straw that tipped us towards the Mach E since we both know the A/C is going to perform well in AZ.

20200728_134818.jpg
Yeah the FFE is/was always really good with A/C keeping things nice and cool.

The Bolt also does a pretty good job without consuming much extra battery.

In both cases driving around on a really hot day doesn't impact your range much (looks like you're averaging about 320 Wh/mile in this display or just above 3 miles/kWh--that seems a bit high for a FFE).
 

FPLiptak

Member
First Name
Frank
Joined
Jun 21, 2020
Messages
8
Reaction score
6
Location
Saint George, UT
First Name
Frank
Vehicles
2016 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid, 2018 Chevrolet Bolt Premmium
Occupation
Senior Support Engineer - Nuclear
Country flag
I have been driving a Bolt for over 2 years now and don't use the one-pedal driving. I do let off the accelerator pedal and allow it to regen that way. I also use the paddle on the left side of the steering wheel to decelerate and can go all the way to full stop with the paddle. I still average ~220 miles per charge. Yes, I take it down to <30 miles before charging.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
174
Reaction score
117
Location
Dearborn, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
Why range anxiety with a PHEV? That's the main reason for getting a PHEV instead of a BEV -- to avoid battery range anxiety since you have gasoline fuel when you run out of electric fuel.
Because the PHEV range becomes a limit on your life. It's common with the PHEV owners I know - some have even admitted to driving in the winter without heat on in order to prevent an engine start.
 

zhackwyatt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
406
Reaction score
499
Location
Arizona
Vehicles
'13 C-Max
Country flag
Because the PHEV range becomes a limit on your life. It's common with the PHEV owners I know - some have even admitted to driving in the winter without heat on in order to prevent an engine start.
I'm confused as well. Why buy a car with a built-in gas generator if you try your best to never use it?
 

zhackwyatt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
406
Reaction score
499
Location
Arizona
Vehicles
'13 C-Max
Country flag
There is a skill required to drive an EV well and it's fun to learn all these new techniques. Some like to maximize efficiency, others like to make their drive tires last as long as possible because EVs destroy tires if the driver isn't careful. Max acceleration is learned by the driver. A skilled driver will always accelerate faster compared to a driver who just mashes the pedal to the floor (all else being equal of course). The software will derate the power to the motor when wheel spin is detected but a skilled driver can feel that limit and limit the derate effect.
There was a guy on the C-Max Forum way back in 2013. He got 800 miles on a single tank. The best I ever did was low 600s. For the past couple of years though it has been 500 since I just don't pay much attention anymore. Both numbers are in reference to the pure hybrid, not the plug-in models.
 

zhackwyatt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
406
Reaction score
499
Location
Arizona
Vehicles
'13 C-Max
Country flag
I watched a podcast on the subject a while back and one of the panel guests was from Magna International which is the company responsible for helping Ford bring the Focus Electric to market. The subject of 1 pedal driving was discussed in some detail. All else being equal, it takes a specific amount of energy to increase speed from A to B. The energy recovered via regeneration from B to A is always less.
Do you happen to have a link? I'd like to listen to this.
 

dprav

New Member
First Name
Praveen
Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
San Jose, CA, USA
First Name
Praveen
Vehicles
Bolt
Country flag
I'm almost afraid I'll like it too much, or get too used to it. Like many mainstream buyers, we'll have both a BEV and an ICE vehicle in our household (especially for road trips). I don't want it to be too big of a difference to jump back and forth.
I really don't think so. I have a Bolt and just love the 1 pedal option and when I switch to my other ICE vehicle, muscle memory kicks in.
 

SnBGC

Well-Known Member
First Name
Greg
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
154
Reaction score
121
Location
Phoenix
First Name
Greg
Vehicles
Ford Focus Electric
Occupation
Managet
Country flag
Yeah the FFE is/was always really good with A/C keeping things nice and cool.

The Bolt also does a pretty good job without consuming much extra battery.

In both cases driving around on a really hot day doesn't impact your range much (looks like you're averaging about 320 Wh/mile in this display or just above 3 miles/kWh--that seems a bit high for a FFE).
Yes. Pretty high. The price I pay for leaving it on while I am inside the store or shop that I am visiting. I work for a Sign and Lighting company so I travel around town during the day to check on the progress of our various crews and take an opportunity to make sure our customers are taken care of. What I do is park the car, exit the vehicle and then remote start it with my key fob. On a Ford, the remote start process also locks the doors so the vehicle sits there with the A/C running to keep the battery cool as well as condition the cabin. While I don't have what most here will consider a ton of range....the 115 miles I start with each day is almost always way more than I need. For those days where I need a little more....I have a L2 charger at work that is available to me.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
174
Reaction score
117
Location
Dearborn, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
I'm confused as well. Why buy a car with a built-in gas generator if you try your best to never use it?
Because it's sold as a BEV for daily use, with a generator for longer trips. So you buy it under that assumption, and then you can't justify starting the engine just to go to Meijer *and* Home Depot on the same day since you only have 20 miles round trip from your plug, so you decide to go to one today, one tomorrow... decisions like that. The anxiety builds and builds and I couldn't take it anymore, and had to buy a BEV to ditch the PHEV range anxiety.
 

SnBGC

Well-Known Member
First Name
Greg
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
154
Reaction score
121
Location
Phoenix
First Name
Greg
Vehicles
Ford Focus Electric
Occupation
Managet
Country flag
Do you happen to have a link? I'd like to listen to this.
Let me try and find it for you. I think it was a YouTube program actually.....it was part of all the research I was doing when we bought our first PHEV and excited about the technology. Have you seen the patent approval that was issued to Magna for the FFE cooling system? Very technical and full of interesting info...
 

Raymondjram

Well-Known Member
First Name
Raymond
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
61
Reaction score
67
Location
Bayamon
First Name
Raymond
Vehicles
2014 Ford Fusion Hybrid LE sedan
Occupation
Retired Engineer
Country flag
Once you get used to one pedal driving, it is hard to go back to the "old" way!!!!
I have to test that out first. Some passengers, including my wife, may get dizzy or offended if I dirve an EV with strong regeneration. I believe it will feel as bad as shifting to "Low" from "Drive" in a gasoline engine car. The passengers will feel too much decceleration (reverse acceleration) and complain. to the driver as if he stepped on the brakes.
 

Nak

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mike
Joined
Jan 5, 2020
Messages
213
Reaction score
189
Location
Camas, Washington
First Name
Mike
Vehicles
Tesla Model Y Performance, Tesla Model 3, 1992 K1500 Blazer
Country flag
With regen braking both comfort and efficiency are driver skill dependent. If the driver treats the throttle as an "On/Off" switch, regen will be uncomfortable and inefficient. If the driver has the minimal skill level needed to feather the throttle, regen/(one pedal driving) braking is both more comfortable and more efficient. The comment about slowing down then speeding back up being inefficient is correct if that's the way you drive. i.e. you drive poorly. The correct way to drive one pedal is to feather the throttle to achieve the desired speed. If you do that you are getting the best efficiency for the conditions.
 

dbsb3233

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
2,035
Reaction score
1,482
Location
Colorado, USA
First Name
Tim
Vehicles
2013 Ford Escape
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Because it's sold as a BEV for daily use, with a generator for longer trips. So you buy it under that assumption, and then you can't justify starting the engine just to go to Meijer *and* Home Depot on the same day since you only have 20 miles round trip from your plug, so you decide to go to one today, one tomorrow... decisions like that. The anxiety builds and builds and I couldn't take it anymore, and had to buy a BEV to ditch the PHEV range anxiety.
It's sold as a hybrid with 30 miles (or whatever the number for that model) of electric range with 300 (or whatever) of gas range. Just because you logically use the EV miles first (home charging is cheaper than gas) before kicking into the gas doesn't mean you should be afraid to use gas around home. That's just silly. And if someone actually has that mindset, they're being silly.

But having said that, I could actually see some people being THAT silly. There are some hardcore EV people that probably think that way. Even though it doesn't make any sense.

But that's their self-imposed problem. Fortunately I'm not one of them. If I bought a PHEV, I'd be perfectly fine using gas after running out of electricity.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
174
Reaction score
117
Location
Dearborn, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
It's sold as a hybrid with 30 miles (or whatever the number for that model) of electric range with 300 (or whatever) of gas range. Just because you logically use the EV miles first (home charging is cheaper than gas) before kicking into the gas doesn't mean you should be afraid to use gas around home. That's just silly. And if someone actually has that mindset, they're being silly.

But having said that, I could actually see some people being THAT silly. There are some hardcore EV people that probably think that way. Even though it doesn't make any sense.

But that's their self-imposed problem. Fortunately I'm not one of them. If I bought a PHEV, I'd be perfectly fine using gas after running out of electricity.
I know a half-dozen PHEV owners who admit to behavior changes because of the PHEV, mostly just changing plans to account for range, but also some that as I said don't use heat in the winter, and wear extra warm clothes to drive without the heat, to some that will use expensive pay charging stations with their PHEV even though it costs more than gas, just to stop the engine from starting.

The PHEVs actually score you on how little the engine is used, you unlock achievements for more EV only miles, etc. - the car is designed to encourage that behavior (the Ford PHEVs anyway).

I broke my lease to get out of my PHEV and into a BEV to get rid of range anxiety.
 

dbsb3233

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
2,035
Reaction score
1,482
Location
Colorado, USA
First Name
Tim
Vehicles
2013 Ford Escape
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
I know a half-dozen PHEV owners who admit to behavior changes because of the PHEV, mostly just changing plans to account for range, but also some that as I said don't use heat in the winter, and wear extra warm clothes to drive without the heat, to some that will use expensive pay charging stations with their PHEV even though it costs more than gas, just to stop the engine from starting.

The PHEVs actually score you on how little the engine is used, you unlock achievements for more EV only miles, etc. - the car is designed to encourage that behavior (the Ford PHEVs anyway).

I broke my lease to get out of my PHEV and into a BEV to get rid of range anxiety.
Well again, that's just silly. And illogical. But oh well, it's their choice.
 



 








Top