Real World range testing reveals differences between stated/print "EPA ranges" for most vehicles.

Billyk24

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This link: https://insideevs.com/news/407807/e...psgYwnqoLWTamI_sk3qeh2x1xhdf-lQxjlun-xnlLm6BE has the results
1. Hyundai Kona Electric, 259 miles (258 EPA miles)


2. Jaguar I-Pace, 253 miles (234 EPA miles)


2. Kia Niro EV, 253 miles (239 EPA miles)


4. Tesla Model 3 Performance, 239 miles (299 EPA miles)


5. Tesla Model X P100D, 233 miles (289 EPA miles)


6. Nissan LEAF e+, 217 miles (226 EPA miles)


7. Mercedes-Benz EQC, 208 miles (259 WLTP miles - anticipated 220 EPA miles)


8. Tesla Model S 75kWh, 204 miles (259 EPA miles)


9. Audi e-tron, 196 miles (204 EPA miles)


10. Renault ZOE R135, 192 miles (238 WLTP miles)


11. Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus, 181 miles (250 EPA miles)


12. BMW i3 120Ah, 165 miles (153 EPA miles)
Not surprising at the differences for most vehicles. Tesla down 20-29%.
 

eager2own

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There's a pretty clear trend that every one of the tested vehicles is very close to the EPA numbers . . . except for each of the Tesla models.
 

pbojanoski

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Wow, I don't know how scientific the evaluation was based on the above information, but Tesla is looking pretty bad here. I am VERY surprised.

The article didn't seem to offer the testing criteria or how they made it so that the criteria would remain the same for all models tested.

After following several links, the following seems to be the criteria, although I didn't see how they ensured similar weather conditions, etc. while testing each vehicle.

https://www.whatcar.com/news/what-car-real-range-how-we-work-it-out/n18158#1
 

dbsb3233

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The range tests I still really want to see are interstate road trip simulations at a constant 75 MPH the entire way. That's the one that has real meaning to me (and I think to most people if they really thought about it in depth). Anything over probably 120 miles is plenty for daily around-home driving for most people (then recharging at home at night). Where range really matters is long road trips. And that's usually at high speed (in the US/Canada anyway).

The numbers above are from yet another "combined average" test, which while interesting for showing the variance from EPA, are still not very helpful for determining range where it matters most.

Someone needs to take these things to a NASCAR race track and do a consistent 75 MPH range test.
 

eager2own

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I took the liberty of plugging those into a spreadsheet and ranking them by %Difference relative to their EPA figures...
Thanks. But a bit unfair to compare Renault's to the WLTP miles. That would be a large negative for all vehicles. Renault should be left off the chart given there's no EPA estimate.
That highlights that Tesla is the only one underperforming significantly.
 

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RyZt

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Wow, I don't know how scientific the evaluation was based on the above information, but Tesla is looking pretty bad here. I am VERY surprised.

The article didn't seem to offer the testing criteria or how they made it so that the criteria would remain the same for all models tested.

After following several links, the following seems to be the criteria, although I didn't see how they ensured similar weather conditions, etc. while testing each vehicle.

https://www.whatcar.com/news/what-car-real-range-how-we-work-it-out/n18158#1
The article you mentioned explained the weather part:
* The cars are stored overnight in an air-conditioned chamber at 18deg C while plugged in
* The driving part of the test is only conducted when the ambient air temperature is between 10 and 15deg C.
 

pbojanoski

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The article you mentioned explained the weather part:
* The cars are stored overnight in an air-conditioned chamber at 18deg C while plugged in
* The driving part of the test is only conducted when the ambient air temperature is between 10 and 15deg C.
True, but wind conditions and other affects could come into play and I'm not sure if that was taken into account. I'd love to see additional tests to see if they follow a pattern.
 
OP

Billyk24

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  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
He is another so called independent test of various EV highway mileage:
ModelPrice (from) Official rangeWhat Car? Real RangeDifference (miles)Difference (%)
Audi e-tron£68,020248 miles196 miles-52 miles-21%
BMW i3£31,680193 miles 165 miles-28 miles-15%
Hyundai Ioniq £26,745 174 miles 117 miles -57 miles -33%
Hyundai Kona Electric£27,250279 miles 259 miles-20 miles-7%
Jaguar I-Pace£60,995292 miles 253 miles -39 miles-13%
Kia e-Niro£32,995282 miles 253 miles -29 miles-10%
Nissan Leaf£24,495168 miles 128 miles-40 miles-24%
Renault Zoe£17,720186 miles 146 miles-40 miles-22%
Smart ForFour EQ£18,190 68 miles 57 miles -11 miles -16%
Smart ForTwo EQ£19,83570 miles 59 miles -11 miles -16%
Tesla Model 3 (Performance)£49,140329 miles239 miles-90 miles-27%
Tesla Model 3 (Standard Range Plus)£36,490254 miles196 miles-58 miles-23%
Tesla Model S (75D)£68,900259 miles204 miles-55 miles-21%
Tesla Model X (100D)£73,900351 miles 233 miles-118 miles-34%
Volkswagen e-Golf £29,230 186 miles117 miles -69 miles-37%
Volkswagen e-Up £19,615 83 miles 66 miles -17 miles -21%

OFFICIAL VS REAL RANGE OF ELECTRIC CARS TESTED BY WHAT CAR?
Link: https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money...ls-range-Teslas-Model-3-90-miles-claimed.html
Tesla is again in the minus 20% range of what the tested print range states.
 

RyZt

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He is another so called independent test of various EV highway mileage:

...

OFFICIAL VS REAL RANGE OF ELECTRIC CARS TESTED BY WHAT CAR?

Link: https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money...ls-range-Teslas-Model-3-90-miles-claimed.html
Tesla is again in the minus 20% range of what the tested print range states.
The article you quoted cites the same data source as the article from OP.
Source (result): https://www.whatcar.com/news/what-c...-car-can-go-farthest-in-the-real-world/n18159
Source (method): https://www.whatcar.com/news/what-car-real-range-how-we-work-it-out/n18158

The method link is the same link that silverelan posted earlier.

However, the data in your chart is different from its cited source, which dbsb3233 summarized above. I don't know what's going on there.
 

Nak

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Yes, the EPA is colluding with Tesla to inflate their range numbers. Seriously?

Here is an excerpt from an article on InsideEVs.
While What Car? does not do that, we recommend our readers to pay attention to test methods regarding energy consumption. If they are not performed until there is no single Wh left on the battery pack, stick with official rankings, such as EPA's. This probably is the safest way to check the efficiency of an electric car when compared to others.
https://insideevs.com/news/365941/what-car-different-results-epa/

You can judge articles based on the knowledge that most slant their stories and supposed data to please their readers and increase clicks. Or you can just look for whatever article confirms your bias. You can look for the truth, or you can be happy in your intentional ignorance. Sadly, many choose to be intentionally ignorant.
 

dbsb3233

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The problem with all that is most people don't care how they do in the lab, they care about how they do out on the road in the real world.

I get that tests need to be done consistently from one vehicle to the next in order to be fair. But I almost got the impression their point was less about that than wanting favorable conditions for Tesla. That's probably not the case but it kinda read that way.

And I still come back to my usual "where range usually matters is long road trips" point. Which makes their regen point kinda moot. No one is doing any regen driving 250 straight miles on an interstate. Regen matters for stop/go city driving, of course, but for most people range around home doesn't matter much if you're plugging in at home every night anyway.
 
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