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ChasingCoral

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Interesting read. Nothing new to most of the folks here, still interesting though.

https://www.greencarreports.com/new...ale-for-its-own-battery-factory-to-make-sense
Here it is without the click:

Report: Ford sees "insufficient scale" for its own battery factory to make sense
avatar-image-for-stephed_100440631_s.jpg

STEPHEN EDELSTEIN SEPTEMBER 2, 2020

Several automakers are planning their own battery factories to support increased electric-car production, but Ford isn't one of them.

The automaker sees "insufficient scale" for its own battery factory to make financial sense, and will continue sourcing batteries solely from suppliers, according to an Automotive News Europe report.

The report cites a Ford second-quarter analyst call, in which head of product development and purchasing Hau Thai-Tang said the automaker would need to produce 100,000 to 150,000 EVs annually for its own battery factory to make sense.

This seems to indicate that Ford doesn't plan to make anywhere close to that many EVs for some time.

Ford's most high-profile EV is the Mustang Mach-E, which is scheduled to start deliveries later this year. At the SUV's 2019 unveiling, Ford executive Joe Hinrichs said the first full year of production would be limited to 50,000 units for global consumption—due to battery availability.

Electric versions of the F-150 pickup truck and Transit van have also been confirmed, although it's unclear if these will be high-volume models.

ford-f-150_100709171_l.jpg
Ford F-Series electric truck prototype

A long list of automakers don't seem to agree with Ford's battery strategy.

General Motors and LG Chem are partnering on a $2.3 billion battery factory in Lordstown, Ohio, which will make batteries for vehicles going on sale in 2023 and beyond. That's expected to include a Chevrolet electric pickup truck and the Cadillac Lyriq crossover—as well as the GMC Hummer EV that will be on sale by then.

Battery subsidiary Accumotive is deeply involved in Daimler's EV plans. Accumotive is opening a network for new factories to supply batteries for its parent company.

While they don't want to make batteries themselves, BMW and Volkswagen are aiming for very close control of production.

As it seeks to secure batteries without its own factory, Ford is already potentially caught in a dispute between LG Chem and SK innovation. LG Chem is attempting to block a pair of SK Innovation battery factories on a shared site in Georgia, alleging trade-secret violations. The factories are earmarked to supply batteries for the electric F-150, as well as VW ID.4 crossovers built at the German automaker's Tennessee factory.
 

Kamuelaflyer

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Here it is without the click:

Report: Ford sees "insufficient scale" for its own battery factory to make sense
avatar-image-for-stephed_100440631_s.jpg

STEPHEN EDELSTEIN SEPTEMBER 2, 2020

Several automakers are planning their own battery factories to support increased electric-car production, but Ford isn't one of them.

The automaker sees "insufficient scale" for its own battery factory to make financial sense, and will continue sourcing batteries solely from suppliers, according to an Automotive News Europe report.

The report cites a Ford second-quarter analyst call, in which head of product development and purchasing Hau Thai-Tang said the automaker would need to produce 100,000 to 150,000 EVs annually for its own battery factory to make sense.

This seems to indicate that Ford doesn't plan to make anywhere close to that many EVs for some time.

Ford's most high-profile EV is the Mustang Mach-E, which is scheduled to start deliveries later this year. At the SUV's 2019 unveiling, Ford executive Joe Hinrichs said the first full year of production would be limited to 50,000 units for global consumption—due to battery availability.

Electric versions of the F-150 pickup truck and Transit van have also been confirmed, although it's unclear if these will be high-volume models.

ford-f-150_100709171_l.jpg
Ford F-Series electric truck prototype

A long list of automakers don't seem to agree with Ford's battery strategy.

General Motors and LG Chem are partnering on a $2.3 billion battery factory in Lordstown, Ohio, which will make batteries for vehicles going on sale in 2023 and beyond. That's expected to include a Chevrolet electric pickup truck and the Cadillac Lyriq crossover—as well as the GMC Hummer EV that will be on sale by then.

Battery subsidiary Accumotive is deeply involved in Daimler's EV plans. Accumotive is opening a network for new factories to supply batteries for its parent company.

While they don't want to make batteries themselves, BMW and Volkswagen are aiming for very close control of production.

As it seeks to secure batteries without its own factory, Ford is already potentially caught in a dispute between LG Chem and SK innovation. LG Chem is attempting to block a pair of SK Innovation battery factories on a shared site in Georgia, alleging trade-secret violations. The factories are earmarked to supply batteries for the electric F-150, as well as VW ID.4 crossovers built at the German automaker's Tennessee factory.
Thanks. Someday I'll learn how to do that. ;)
 

I.Adams

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Here it is without the click:

Report: Ford sees "insufficient scale" for its own battery factory to make sense
avatar-image-for-stephed_100440631_s.jpg

STEPHEN EDELSTEIN SEPTEMBER 2, 2020

Several automakers are planning their own battery factories to support increased electric-car production, but Ford isn't one of them.

The automaker sees "insufficient scale" for its own battery factory to make financial sense, and will continue sourcing batteries solely from suppliers, according to an Automotive News Europe report.

The report cites a Ford second-quarter analyst call, in which head of product development and purchasing Hau Thai-Tang said the automaker would need to produce 100,000 to 150,000 EVs annually for its own battery factory to make sense.

This seems to indicate that Ford doesn't plan to make anywhere close to that many EVs for some time.

Ford's most high-profile EV is the Mustang Mach-E, which is scheduled to start deliveries later this year. At the SUV's 2019 unveiling, Ford executive Joe Hinrichs said the first full year of production would be limited to 50,000 units for global consumption—due to battery availability.

Electric versions of the F-150 pickup truck and Transit van have also been confirmed, although it's unclear if these will be high-volume models.

ford-f-150_100709171_l.jpg
Ford F-Series electric truck prototype

A long list of automakers don't seem to agree with Ford's battery strategy.

General Motors and LG Chem are partnering on a $2.3 billion battery factory in Lordstown, Ohio, which will make batteries for vehicles going on sale in 2023 and beyond. That's expected to include a Chevrolet electric pickup truck and the Cadillac Lyriq crossover—as well as the GMC Hummer EV that will be on sale by then.

Battery subsidiary Accumotive is deeply involved in Daimler's EV plans. Accumotive is opening a network for new factories to supply batteries for its parent company.

While they don't want to make batteries themselves, BMW and Volkswagen are aiming for very close control of production.

As it seeks to secure batteries without its own factory, Ford is already potentially caught in a dispute between LG Chem and SK innovation. LG Chem is attempting to block a pair of SK Innovation battery factories on a shared site in Georgia, alleging trade-secret violations. The factories are earmarked to supply batteries for the electric F-150, as well as VW ID.4 crossovers built at the German automaker's Tennessee factory.
That shows that Ford doesn't really want to start honestly with the electro mobility. They are afraid. Other auto maker even realised that this market doesn't expand, the market is right now exploding. A wrong decision at right on the beginning.
 

dbsb3233

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That shows that Ford doesn't really want to start honestly with the electro mobility. They are afraid. Other auto maker even realised that this market doesn't expand, the market is right now exploding. A wrong decision at right on the beginning.
Clearly they want to start, as they're doing just that with the Mach-e (and the upcoming Transit BEV, and the upcoming F-150 BEV). But it's true that they don't have immediate interest in a wholesale shift to BEV. Most of their offerings will remain ICE, hybrid, or PHEV for the foreseeable future.

Looks to me like Ford sees a bigger market this decade for PHEV than pure BEV. And I can understand why. At least until the next quantum leap in batteries comes along that doubles the range and cuts charging time in half (at least).
 

Mach-MI

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BEV on road tripping also depends upon the charging networks and locations. Some locations are not good for BEV as the UP of your state has zero Tesla superchargers. In 2017, neither South or North Dakota had a supercharger. The chicken and egg contrast exists for many BEVs.
Sure, and I've taken my EV across the UP. It wasn't ultra convenient, but totally doable.

I'm taking mine to the Dakotas next week, but yes a Mach-E would have issues there.
 

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That shows that Ford doesn't really want to start honestly with the electro mobility. They are afraid. Other auto maker even realised that this market doesn't expand, the market is right now exploding. A wrong decision at right on the beginning.
Certain countries have better support for purchase and other. Consumer demand and interest is another issue. Forcing BEV upon consumers isn't going to work when many realize the limitations for road tripping and question the extra upfront costs.
 

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".... biggest rivals are spending billions: battery production."

^^ This. With Fords current BEV and PHEV portfolio (Mach-E, Transit, Escape/Kuga PHEV, Explorer/Aviator PHEV), I would have a hard time rationalizing having my own battery production as well.

It's quite possible Ford may re-entertain this idea after a full year of production for Mach-E and after the upcoming F150 BEV is in production.
 

efisher

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What Ford is saying is that (at least for now,) they cannot make batteries as efficiently as other companies can. That they can get better, cheaper, or more reliable batteries elsewhere. This is not surprising. Even Tesla had to not just partner with Panasonic, but also go into the Powerwall and alternative energy business to consume the production since the number of cars produced were not enough to achieve efficient scale.
 
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Billyk24

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What Ford is saying is that (at least for now,) they cannot make batteries as efficiently as other companies can. That they can get better, cheaper, or more reliable batteries elsewhere. This is not surprising. Even Tesla has to partner with Panasonic
What Ford is saying is that (at least for now,) they cannot make batteries as efficiently as other companies can. ---This ignores what Ford has stated about Toyota battery history and ignores future advances in this area making money spent-money wasted in the future.
 

ChasingCoral

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Remember, if Ford starts building a battery factory now, they need to start with the production of cells that are state of the art in 3-4 years from now. In 5 years, I expect them to at least be working on a battery factory, if not running one.

For now, I'm fine having Ford focus on making the best car they can and let someone else do the battery development.
 



 









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