Advertisement



Tesla model 3 Performance has 80.5kWh battery pack, 250kW charging capabilities but takes 40 minutes to charge?

Billyk24

Well-Known Member
First Name
William
Joined
Nov 29, 2019
Messages
730
Reaction score
312
Location
PA
First Name
William
Vehicles
Ford C-Max Energi, Premium Mach-E ordered
Country flag
Is my math off, the Tesla photos not correct or does the Tesla mode 3 on a V3 Supercharger have one heck of a taper drop off?
tesla V3 peak charging curve.png
Tesla model 3 performance 80.5kWh battery pack.jpg
 

mark360

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
209
Reaction score
186
Location
North Carolina
First Name
Mark
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3 AWD(OLD), Ford Raptor
Occupation
Manufacturing
Country flag
Yep, I owned my Tesla and got the 250KW experience. IT is only marginally faster, and it really just a marketing gimmick. While it does speed up the charging time from 0-70% significantly, most the time people don't want to arrive at the charger at less than 20%.

What you get from Tesla is constantly over promises and under delivering. I was sorely disappointing in my ownership experience with a Tesla. All aspects of the ownership was just bad, except for driving it.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
410
Reaction score
301
Location
Detroit, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
Yep, I owned my Tesla and got the 250KW experience. IT is only marginally faster, and it really just a marketing gimmick. While it does speed up the charging time from 0-70% significantly, most the time people don't want to arrive at the charger at less than 20%.

What you get from Tesla is constantly over promises and under delivering. I was sorely disappointing in my ownership experience with a Tesla. All aspects of the ownership was just bad, except for driving it.
Why wouldn't you want to arrive under 20%? The charge rate is faster the lower you arrive at... so I always try to arrive as low as possible, and only charge until the taper hits.

Unplug after it drops below 100kW, move on. Works great, personally.
 

timbop

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
1,213
Reaction score
1,414
Location
New Jersey
First Name
Tim
Vehicles
2015 Mustang Convertible, 2016 Dodge Durango
Occupation
Software Engineer
Country flag
Is my math off, the Tesla photos not correct or does the Tesla mode 3 on a V3 Supercharger have one heck of a taper drop off?
tesla V3 peak charging curve.png
Tesla model 3 performance 80.5kWh battery pack.jpg
That's 40 minutes to 100%, looking at the "charge to" bar.
 

jlauro

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
330
Reaction score
189
Location
Owosso, MI
First Name
John
Vehicles
Charger R/T AWD, Rav4, future Mach-E
Country flag
Why wouldn't you want to arrive under 20%? The charge rate is faster the lower you arrive at... so I always try to arrive as low as possible, and only charge until the taper hits.
In case where you were planning to charge at is down/full and you need enough charge to make it to the next.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
410
Reaction score
301
Location
Detroit, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
In case where you were planning to charge at is down/full and you need enough charge to make it to the next.
When the car provides live status of the station, that doesn't seem like a large concern.

I've regularly skipped Superchargers in order to arrive at the ones I want, even if it's only with a few percent. Never bothered me.
 

jlauro

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
330
Reaction score
189
Location
Owosso, MI
First Name
John
Vehicles
Charger R/T AWD, Rav4, future Mach-E
Country flag
When the car provides live status of the station, that doesn't seem like a large concern.

I've regularly skipped Superchargers in order to arrive at the ones I want, even if it's only with a few percent. Never bothered me.
Not suggesting it would both me either... That said, my wife gets all nervous when the gas tank is down to a quarter of the tank, and it's easier to find a dozen gas stations than a single charging station in this area of the country. Reports of charging stations being down or unavailable for weeks at a time show up in the news more often than gas stations, and that certainly doesn't inspire confidence for anyone with range anxiety.
 

mark360

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
209
Reaction score
186
Location
North Carolina
First Name
Mark
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3 AWD(OLD), Ford Raptor
Occupation
Manufacturing
Country flag
Why wouldn't you want to arrive under 20%? The charge rate is faster the lower you arrive at... so I always try to arrive as low as possible, and only charge until the taper hits.

Unplug after it drops below 100kW, move on. Works great, personally.
For many reasons, but the Tesla trip planner in the car certainly can be off drastically in my 10,000 mile road trip experience. Because of range anxiety. And from traveling across the country in the model 3, the superchargers are too far apart to time it perfectly to arrive at 5% every time. There are not enough of them. I'm still amazed at how rain and windy conditions affected my cars range. IT was certainly never a 300 mile car, more like 220-250 in the summer and 150 miles in the winter. That makes for fun trip planning.

Regularly I would arrive with 20+% and have to charge until 80%, no big deal. But often times I would never even see full SC output with the 250KW stations I would go to. It was more like a 175KW station which is all I would ever see. Later I remember seeing in Tesla news that Tesla actually doesn't always allow your car to receive full output. Oftentimes they don't allow it. Odd.

Once I stayed overnight in the winter in a hotel in Asheville. I arrived late that night with about 25% battery remaining but there was a supercharger across the street. When I woke up that morning, my car had the snowflake and while I don't recall the range loss, it was very significant. To the point to where I was shocked. Regardless, I get to that supercharger and It took me sitting there for around two hours until my battery was back up to 80%. Electric cars do terrible road tripping in cold climates, regularly saw 50% range loss if you wanted to be comfortable in the car.

Just made for a trip planning nightmare to be honest. When you can turn the heater on in the car and instantly lose half of your range, that doesn't sit well with a lot of folks. Combine that with interstate speeds, wind, rain, etc and who knows how much range you'll get? It's certainly no where near as bad in ICE vehicles.
 
Last edited:

GregM

Well-Known Member
First Name
Greg
Joined
Mar 11, 2020
Messages
110
Reaction score
65
Location
Virginia
First Name
Greg
Vehicles
Audi A3, Tahoe, Mustang Mach E Premium (on order)
Occupation
Communications/Marketing
Country flag
For many reasons, but the Tesla trip planner in the car certainly can be off drastically in my 10,000 mile road trip experience. Because of range anxiety. And from traveling across the country in the model 3, the superchargers are too far apart to time it perfectly to arrive at 5% every time. There are not enough of them. I'm still amazed at how rain and windy conditions affected my cars range. IT was certainly never a 300 mile car, more like 220-250 in the summer and 150 miles in the winter. That makes for fun trip planning.

Regularly I would arrive with 20+% and have to charge until 80%, no big deal. But often times I would never even see full SC output with the 250KW stations I would go to. It was more like a 175KW station which is all I would ever see. Later I remember seeing in Tesla news that Tesla actually doesn't always allow your car to receive full output. Oftentimes they don't allow it. Odd.

Once I stayed overnight in the winter in a hotel in Asheville. I arrived late that night with about 25% battery remaining but there was a supercharger across the street. When I woke up that morning, my car had the snowflake and while I don't recall the range loss, it was very significant. To the point to where I was shocked. Regardless, I get to that supercharger and It took me sitting there for around two hours until my battery was back up to 80%. Electric cars do terrible road tripping in cold climates, regularly saw 50% range loss if you wanted to be comfortable in the car.

Just made for a trip planning nightmare to be honest. When you can turn the heater on in the car and instantly lose half of your range, that doesn't sit well with a lot of folks. Combine that with interstate speeds, wind, rain, etc and who knows how much range you'll get? It's certainly no where near as bad in ICE vehicles.
It makes me really wonder how the MME will maintain range in the winter without a heat pump - I am sure Ford thought of this, given the winter testing we have seen.
 

mark360

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
209
Reaction score
186
Location
North Carolina
First Name
Mark
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3 AWD(OLD), Ford Raptor
Occupation
Manufacturing
Country flag
It makes me really wonder how the MME will maintain range in the winter without a heat pump - I am sure Ford thought of this, given the winter testing we have seen.
The bigger battery in it will help a lot. But still yet to be determined. Heat pump doesn’t do anything because they’re only effective down to about 40-50f.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
410
Reaction score
301
Location
Detroit, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
For many reasons, but the Tesla trip planner in the car certainly can be off drastically in my 10,000 mile road trip experience. Because of range anxiety. And from traveling across the country in the model 3, the superchargers are too far apart to time it perfectly to arrive at 5% every time. There are not enough of them. I'm still amazed at how rain and windy conditions affected my cars range. IT was certainly never a 300 mile car, more like 220-250 in the summer and 150 miles in the winter. That makes for fun trip planning.

Regularly I would arrive with 20+% and have to charge until 80%, no big deal. But often times I would never even see full SC output with the 250KW stations I would go to. It was more like a 175KW station which is all I would ever see. Later I remember seeing in Tesla news that Tesla actually doesn't always allow your car to receive full output. Oftentimes they don't allow it. Odd.

Once I stayed overnight in the winter in a hotel in Asheville. I arrived late that night with about 25% battery remaining but there was a supercharger across the street. When I woke up that morning, my car had the snowflake and while I don't recall the range loss, it was very significant. To the point to where I was shocked. Regardless, I get to that supercharger and It took me sitting there for around two hours until my battery was back up to 80%. Electric cars do terrible road tripping in cold climates, regularly saw 50% range loss if you wanted to be comfortable in the car.

Just made for a trip planning nightmare to be honest. When you can turn the heater on in the car and instantly lose half of your range, that doesn't sit well with a lot of folks. Combine that with interstate speeds, wind, rain, etc and who knows how much range you'll get? It's certainly no where near as bad in ICE vehicles.
I've never *ever* had an issue with the in-car route planner, on 20,000 miles of road trips. It's never stranded me. Trip planning is so easy!

I road trip in cold climates as well, have never seen anything larger than 40% range loss, and that was at 0F. Certainly not 50%.

I have no issue arriving at 5% or less SoC, it means I get a faster charge.
 

Mach-MI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
410
Reaction score
301
Location
Detroit, MI
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3
Country flag
The bigger battery in it will help a lot. But still yet to be determined. Heat pump doesn’t do anything because they’re only effective down to about 40-50f.
That isn't true for the Y, since it has no electric supplemental heater. The Y's heat pump needs to work in all conditions.
 

mark360

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
209
Reaction score
186
Location
North Carolina
First Name
Mark
Vehicles
Tesla Model 3 AWD(OLD), Ford Raptor
Occupation
Manufacturing
Country flag
That isn't true for the Y, since it has no electric supplemental heater. The Y's heat pump needs to work in all conditions.
I've never *ever* had an issue with the in-car route planner, on 20,000 miles of road trips. It's never stranded me. Trip planning is so easy!

I road trip in cold climates as well, have never seen anything larger than 40% range loss, and that was at 0F. Certainly not 50%.

I have no issue arriving at 5% or less SoC, it means I get a faster charge.
Glad you have had good experiences
 

jlauro

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
330
Reaction score
189
Location
Owosso, MI
First Name
John
Vehicles
Charger R/T AWD, Rav4, future Mach-E
Country flag
The bigger battery in it will help a lot. But still yet to be determined. Heat pump doesn’t do anything because they’re only effective down to about 40-50f.
Modern heat pumps have a wide range, and can typically be effective below 0. That said, there is generally a a limit between hot and cold side, but that can be increased with a multi-stage, and generally have lower efficiency at lower temperatures, but still effective.
 



 










Advertisement


Top