Tesla Supercharging costs per kWh are now while Electrify America is:

Billyk24

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Tesla supercharging rate per kWh is 0.28 cents. Idle fee of 50 cents a minute after "fill-up" but "1.00 per minute" if all the Tesla charging stations are full. This means a 60kW "fill-up" costs $16.80 at the Tesla Supercharger network while the Electify America network cost $1.00 entry fee plus (150kWh charger rate) 24 minutes at 0.99 cents equals $23.76 plus the $1 entry fee so the total is $24.76 for 60kW fill-up. If the EA charging rate is only 125kWh then 48 minutes at 0.69 cents is $33.12 plus the $1 entry fee for a total of $34.12 for 60KW of energy. More than double the Tesla Supercharging cost at 125kWh rate! California just mandate charging by the KW usage and not per minute. Will this creep into a national wide mandate?
 

TheSteelRider

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Will this creep into a national wide mandate?
I sure hope so. Billing by time is not consumer-friendly, and with so little "real" competition yet in the EV market, I don't see billing by time doing anything to encourage BEV manufacturers to support faster rate of charge. It's more of a physics problem than it is a business decision at this point, not likely manufacturers can just enable ridiculously fast rates of charge.
 

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Tesla supercharging rate per kWh is 0.28 cents. Idle fee of 50 cents a minute after "fill-up" but "1.00 per minute" if all the Tesla charging stations are full. This means a 60kW "fill-up" costs $16.80 at the Tesla Supercharger network while the Electify America network cost $1.00 entry fee plus (150kWh charger rate) 24 minutes at 0.99 cents equals $23.76 plus the $1 entry fee so the total is $24.76 for 60kW fill-up. If the EA charging rate is only 125kWh then 48 minutes at 0.69 cents is $33.12 plus the $1 entry fee for a total of $34.12 for 60KW of energy. More than double the Tesla Supercharging cost at 125kWh rate! California just mandate charging by the KW usage and not per minute. Will this creep into a national wide mandate?
I agree we really should move to a kWh price instead of by time.

The costs for EA will vary by location. Since Ford is giving us Pass+ membership (for 2 years) we won't have the $1 session fee. The Pass+ costs at the local EA station in Michigan are $0.70/min at 125kW or more, $0.50/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.18/min at 75kW or less. So in your example 24 minutes at 150 kWh at $0.70 per minute = $16.80 for EA. At 125kWH is 48 minutes at $0.50 per minute = $24. Not as cheap as Tesla for sure but not double the cost.
 
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Billyk24

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Cost vary by location? I am not aware of the differences as I only have a plug in and not a full ev. Can you share these differences.
 

hybrid2bev

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Cost vary by location? I am not aware of the differences as I only have a plug in and not a full ev. Can you share these differences.
There are some variations to the EA Pass+ pricing. I've found 2 different rate structures:
$0.60/min at 125kW or more, $0.42/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.15/min at 75kW or less.
and
$0.70/min at 125kW or more, $0.50/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.18/min at 75kW or less.

EA locations:
1401 S Dewey St, North Platte, NE 69101, USA
Pass+ pricing: $0.60/min at 125kW or more, $0.42/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.15/min at 75kW or less.

345 Brughs Mill Rd, Fincastle, VA 24090
Pass+ pricing: $0.60/min at 125kW or more, $0.42/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.15/min at 75kW or less.

14500 W Colfax Ave, Lakewood, CO
Pass+ pricing: $0.60/min at 125kW or more, $0.42/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.15/min at 75kW or less.

7007 Friars Rd, San Diego, CA 92108, USA
Pass+ pricing: $0.70/min at 125kW or more, $0.50/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.18/min at 75kW or less.

409 N Marketplace Blvd, Lansing, MI 48917
Pass+ pricing: $0.70/min at 125kW or more, $0.50/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.18/min at 75kW or less.

1040 Collinsville Crossing, Collinsville, IL 62234
Pass+ pricing: $0.70/min at 125kW or more, $0.50/min between 125kW and 75kW, $0.18/min at 75kW or less.
 
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Billyk24

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This pricing is not advertised on the EA website. I wonder why?
 

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This pricing is not advertised on the EA website. I wonder why?
It is, you have to scroll down a bit on this page. Change the state in the drop down menu on the left.

What sucks is that your pricing is determined at the beginning of your charging session. So if you start out at 150 kWh rate then your speed tapers down to under 125 kWh when of your SOC is higher you're still paying the 150 kWh rate for each minute.

If I was on a road trip and needed to charge from below 80% to higher than 80% I would try stopping the session when the charging speed tapers under the pricing limits. Then restart the charging session at the lower speed/price until I reached the limit I need. Since there's no per session fee there is no penalty for restarting the session once you reach the lower speeds/pricing.

https://www.electrifyamerica.com/pricing

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Billyk24

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Holy crap! Different prices in different states. Never knew and assume it is due to the "cost" of obtaining electric service in that state/location. How long before pricing is changed to kW obtained?
 

Trekkie

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Until there are more EV drivers states are going to be driven by the lobby groups to make EV charging hard/expensive as they can. In many states they make it so you have to pass all the requirements to run a coal fired electrical plant before you can charge by the usage, that’s why most are by the minute. A few states are seeing the light, but it’s going to be a while.
 

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The price by time model does have its merits. Using a price by time model, EA discourages drivers from hogging a charger for the last bit of capacity.

If it takes just as long to fill up the last 20% of a battery as it does the first 80%, then EA needs to find a way to motivate people to free up the charger.

Our problem is that Ford has a slow charge time for the Mach-E with it taking 45 mins to go from 10% -> 80%. That's $31.50 and costs too damn much.
 

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If the Mach-E charged from 10% -> 80% in 20 mins on EA's 350kW capable chargers, we would all be raving about how cheap and awesome our cars are.
 

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Also remember that the companies are using different models. Tesla poured a bunch of money into their own proprietary charging network in order to sell more of their own cars. It's worth it to them to make less money on the chargers (or even lose money on many) because they make it back on their vehicles.

But that's not the case for the companies that offer non-proprietary charging. Those stations need a standalone business case. Even though a lot of EA's seed money came from VW settlement fines, they don't have the ongoing revenue enhancement that Telsa gets from selling more cars. So it's not a surprise that EA's charging prices are higher.
 

dbsb3233

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If the Mach-E charged from 10% -> 80% in 20 mins on EA's 350kW capable chargers, we would all be raving about how cheap and awesome our cars are.
That would certainly be a big improvement. Although to keep it in perspective... it's still a long way from a 3 minute gas refuel to 100% (in a car that cost $20k less to purchase).

That significant gap will continue to be a major impediment.
 

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That would certainly be a big improvement. Although to keep it in perspective... it's still a long way from a 3 minute gas refuel to 100% (in a car that cost $20k less to purchase).

That significant gap will continue to be a major impediment.
800+ mile Cannonball Run-style road trips are an outlier and not the norm. With a 20-25min recharge stop vs. a typical 10min stop on a road trip, you're looking at a time difference of maybe an hour or so over the same distance.
 
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Billyk24

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800+ mile Cannonball Run-style road trips are an outlier and not the norm. With a 20-25min recharge stop vs. a typical 10min stop on a road trip, you're looking at a time difference of maybe an hour or so over the same distance.
My home in Pa to northern Wi is greater than 800 miles. I can not remember taking a 10 minute break using ice, hybrid or plug in hybrid vehicles. 20 to 30 minutes is realistic. Lack of sufficient number of chargers will make stops mandatory at certain locations and hopefully no waiting for a free spot at the charger.
 

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