The Truth About Electric Cars Biggest Problem

TheSteelRider

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Jason over at Engineering Explained has banged another one out with The Truth About Electric Cars Biggest Problem where he revisits an earlier video where he talked about why the ICE will not anytime soon disappear. This time, he goes a bit more in-depth in comparing the energy from batteries versus the energy from gasoline. He discusses his view on things like electric semis and such as well. The best part for us in this forum, is he put some gratuitous shots of the Mach E in his video! Part of me wonders whether he is a member, or at least has visited this forum? Jason ... you here? Keep up the great videos if you are man, always so informative!
 

silverelan

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Unrelated, but I keep trying to figure out where he's driving. He's in Boise for a lot of his shots but also either in WA or Oregon.
 

highland58

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There was another video somewhere where they talked about towing travel trailer with an electric pickup, uphill. It would seem that the new F-150 will need to be a 3/4 ton just to have the battery for a decent range + the normal 1/2 ton payload. At some point the battery technology should improve enough to make towing and hauling with electric more practical. The cybertruck should work fairly well if not towing, due to a lower coefficient of drag compared to current pickups. I will just continue to use my ICE F-250 for my infrequent hauling needs.
 

silverelan

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For anyone unfamiliar with EVs, Engineering Explained does a great job explaining electric vehicles and debunking a ton of myths. He talks about mining shortages, CO2 emission comparisons and acceleration plus a ton of other stuff.

He's a gear head who loves cars and it was interesting watching him go from trying out EVs to buying one then another (Tesla 3 MR to P3D).
 

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Another great resource for youtube video's is Auto Line After Hours (Engineering Explained is great as well). They do some deep dives with EV's and such. In the last year they have had Ford, Tesla, and GM based conversations to discuss. Just putting it out there if anyone is interested.
 

timbop

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Yes, he does definitely make some great points and I don't think ICE are going away in my lifetime. However, his point about the huge difference in battery size/weight vs an ICE gas tank doesn't tell the whole story. The electric motors in a BEV are much smaller and lighter compared to the drivetrain of an ice, so the larger battery isn't as bad as he implies. ICE vehicles are still lighter for comparable performance, but being able to make the floor out of batteries is a nice solution to the bigger size.
 

timbop

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Oh, and his point about the ROI being much higher by making ICE more efficient rather than investing in BEV's is one of the reasons that governments HAVE to step in. Elon Musk has done this world a huge favor by building an electric car company from scratch and pushing the envelope so it has now become clear to the world that there is an alternative to the horrible consequences of ICE. Because he ran a startup that didn't have en established sales history he had to maintain, or have to keep his quarterly profits up for investors, it was possible for him to build his infrastructure. OEM's don't have that luxury, and consequently have had to wait for musk to prove it is practical and even then they have to keep their ambitions limited due to the staggering difficulty of building an entire EV from scratch while not impacting profit. And that is where the tax incentives come in - the government is able to subsidize some of their R&D through us customers, making it just practical enough for them to do what must be done. The federal government can do that because it is able to draw on the collective resources of the entire nation, and it is ultimately acting in the interests of all its citizens even when it seems like "only the lucky few are getting a break". Cleaner air, viable farmland, healthy fisheries, and a more stable energy supply benefit everyone.

During world war 2, the US government essentially commandeered American industry because that was what was necessary to defeat fascism. Nobody questioned it, and everyone understood it was necessary. People made sacrifices every day because they understood their children's future depended on it. Today our foe is our collective reliance on an energy source that will not only dwindle severely by the end of this century, but whose side effects are going to deeply impact humanity. As a species we will survive, but we will certainly not thrive. There absolutely will be carnage as energy supply can't keep up with the needs of 9 billion people, and changing weather patterns mean once productive farmland will go fallow.
 
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TheSteelRider

TheSteelRider

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Cleaner air, viable farmland, healthy fisheries, and a more stable energy supply benefit everyone.
Could not have said this better. 2019 was a year where I really stepped back and maybe it was because my age turned the next decade marker but I really thought about the world I wanted my kids to grow up in. I want them to be able to breath clean air, have abundant amounts of food available, and live in safety and security without fear of natural disasters, famines, etc. over my lifetime, I have personally experienced the effects of climate change. I'm no tree hugger, I'm no environmentalist. Heck, I live in the energy capital of america ... But, I just think I want to try to do right by my kids, and their kids. And, while BEVs aren't the end all be all, maybe they are part of the solution. I want to be part of the solution.
 

Nak

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Could not have said this better. 2019 was a year where I really stepped back and maybe it was because my age turned the next decade marker but I really thought about the world I wanted my kids to grow up in.
Ditto. It's why I decided to go all in in 2019. Both daily drivers will be EVs soon. (I don't like the term BEV as I don't consider hybrids to be EVs.) There will also be a Tesla solar roof an our house this year. Half the output of the roof should power both of our cars, the other half will reduce our draw from the grid. My'92 Blazer will stick around for the 500 miles/year or so we need it's capability. It's carbon footprint will be more than offset by the solar roof, so our transportation carbon footprint will be net zero.
 

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I am surprised that pickups seem to be going straight to BEV. I expected ICE range extended electric drive with somewhere around 50 miles of BEV range.

My guess is anyone hauling anything heavy will need to charge after about an hour of driving.

Cybertruck specs 300 mile range, but that is empty with the bed closed. Loaded it will probably be a third of that.
 

Nak

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Cybertruck specs 300 mile range, but that is empty with the bed closed. Loaded it will probably be a third of that.
Why would you say that? Nobody knows what the range is based off of, only that the base model will do "at least 300 miles". The tri-motor version will do "at least 500 miles." Someone managed to get a picture of the Cybertruck display from outside while Elon was driving it; it showed 620 miles remaining on the range indicator. I would guess--and this is just a guess--that I'd get about 250 miles of range towing my 24' boat.
 

Whatstreet

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Why would you say that? Nobody knows what the range is based off of, only that the base model will do "at least 300 miles". The tri-motor version will do "at least 500 miles." Someone managed to get a picture of the Cybertruck display from outside while Elon was driving it; it showed 620 miles remaining on the range indicator. I would guess--and this is just a guess--that I'd get about 250 miles of range towing my 24' boat.
Range decreases with load. That will be true no matter how it's powered.

However, the range decrease due to load will be more severe with an EV, as their strength is the efficiency advantage over ICE at light load. Hence, the suggestion for a range extender.

I doubt that range extenders will be pursued because full BEV is inevitable for numerous reasons. One being legislation like is happening in the UK.
 
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