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Speed makes such a huge difference when you get up in the 80 area.
Yes!

I put a spoiler tag around the rest because it's just me nerding out.

On most of the freeways I frequent, it's safe enough to go the speed limit or even a bit lower, I'm usually still passing the large trucks and it wouldn't matter what speed I went, the full-sized F-150s, Rams, etc would pass me, so I feel it's safer just to stay out of their way.

I found 73 is a sweet spot for my efficiency vs time:
My most common trip is about 450 miles one-way on the freeway. If I averaged 80 mph, that's 338 minutes (5.625 hours). At 75 mph, that's 360 minutes, and at 73 mph, that's 370 minutes. Of course there are all kinds of factors that increase the total trip time because averaging those speeds is unrealistic.

Difference: 73 vs 80 mph: 32 minutes.

On these trips, my efficiency at 80 mph is about 2-2.5 mpk; at 75, it's about 2.7-3.1 mpk; at 73 it's 3.1-3.7 mpk (at 73, I can often find a semi to draft behind for long stretches).

This means that at 80 mph, I use 180 to 225 kWh; 145 - 167 kWh at 75 mph; and 129 - 145 kWh at 73 mph. I've averaged around 80-90 kW charging at DCFCs, but let's assume I get 100 kW average charge rates. Here, I'm going to assume a higher efficiency for 80 mph and lower for 75 and 73.

80 mph: 2.5 mpk = 180 kWh = 108 minutes of charging (80 kW -> 135 minutes).
75 mph: 2.7 mpk = 167 kWh = 100 minutes of charging (80 kW -> 125 minutes).
73 mph: 3.1 mpk = 145 kWh = 87 minutes of charging (80 kW -> 109 minutes).

Difference:
73 to 80: about 20 minutes extra time charging if I drive 80 mph instead of 73, assuming 100 kWh charge rate (26 minutes for the 80 kW charge rate).
75 to 80: about 10 minutes of extra charging if I drive 80 instead of 75.
73 to 75: about 15 minutes of extra charging if I drive 75 instead of 73.

Assuming I go from 85% to 25% on the battery between stops (use 60% of the battery, or 53 kWh):

I need 3.5 stops if I go 80 mph; 2.7 stops at 75 mph; 2.5 stops at 73 mph. This really translates to 4 stops at 80 mph and 3 stops at 75 or 73, but I'll have to spend a little more time at the stops if I go 75 vs 73.

Every stop requires at least 10 minutes just to get off the freeway, drive to the charger and get plugged in and charging, and then get back on the freeway. This assumes the chargers aren't busy. That means that because the 80 mph speed requires an extra stop it also requres another extra 10 minutes (assuming no troubles with charging) compared with 75 or 73 mph.

So, in an ideal, non-stop drive, the 80 mph might save me 30 minutes of time=distance/speed, but it'll also cost me at least an extra 30 minutes of stopping, charging, and resuming my trip, assuming there are no problems with the chargers and that there's no wait. It has become pretty standard to see a wait at at least one charger on this drive. Going 73 mph also allows me to consider skipping a stop, while 80 mph does not.

And this just gets worse as the distance of the road trip increases (until an overnight L2 charge resets everything).
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Yes!

I put a spoiler tag around the rest because it's just me nerding out.

On most of the freeways I frequent, it's safe enough to go the speed limit or even a bit lower, I'm usually still passing the large trucks and it wouldn't matter what speed I went, the full-sized F-150s, Rams, etc would pass me, so I feel it's safer just to stay out of their way.

I found 73 is a sweet spot for my efficiency vs time:
My most common trip is about 450 miles one-way on the freeway. If I averaged 80 mph, that's 338 minutes (5.625 hours). At 75 mph, that's 360 minutes, and at 73 mph, that's 370 minutes. Of course there are all kinds of factors that increase the total trip time because averaging those speeds is unrealistic.

Difference: 73 vs 80 mph: 32 minutes.

On these trips, my efficiency at 80 mph is about 2-2.5 mpk; at 75, it's about 2.7-3.1 mpk; at 73 it's 3.1-3.7 mpk (at 73, I can often find a semi to draft behind for long stretches).

This means that at 80 mph, I use 180 to 225 kWh; 145 - 167 kWh at 75 mph; and 129 - 145 kWh at 73 mph. I've averaged around 80-90 kW charging at DCFCs, but let's assume I get 100 kW average charge rates. Here, I'm going to assume a higher efficiency for 80 mph and lower for 75 and 73.

80 mph: 2.5 mpk = 180 kWh = 108 minutes of charging (80 kW -> 135 minutes).
75 mph: 2.7 mpk = 167 kWh = 100 minutes of charging (80 kW -> 125 minutes).
73 mph: 3.1 mpk = 145 kWh = 87 minutes of charging (80 kW -> 109 minutes).

Difference:
73 to 80: about 20 minutes extra time charging if I drive 80 mph instead of 73, assuming 100 kWh charge rate (26 minutes for the 80 kW charge rate).
75 to 80: about 10 minutes of extra charging if I drive 80 instead of 75.
73 to 75: about 15 minutes of extra charging if I drive 75 instead of 73.

Assuming I go from 85% to 25% on the battery between stops (use 60% of the battery, or 53 kWh):

I need 3.5 stops if I go 80 mph; 2.7 stops at 75 mph; 2.5 stops at 73 mph. This really translates to 4 stops at 80 mph and 3 stops at 75 or 73, but I'll have to spend a little more time at the stops if I go 75 vs 73.

Every stop requires at least 10 minutes just to get off the freeway, drive to the charger and get plugged in and charging, and then get back on the freeway. This assumes the chargers aren't busy. That means that because the 80 mph speed requires an extra stop it also requres another extra 10 minutes (assuming no troubles with charging) compared with 75 or 73 mph.

So, in an ideal, non-stop drive, the 80 mph might save me 30 minutes of time=distance/speed, but it'll also cost me at least an extra 30 minutes of stopping, charging, and resuming my trip, assuming there are no problems with the chargers and that there's no wait. It has become pretty standard to see a wait at at least one charger on this drive. Going 73 mph also allows me to consider skipping a stop, while 80 mph does not.

And this just gets worse as the distance of the road trip increases (until an overnight L2 charge resets everything).
Yep. I haven't done the exact math like that but I knew it would end up being pretty close to a wash as the time saved from going 80 is offset by the time it takes to refuel more kWh, plus the time overhead that comes with it (not to mention a little extra cost). A new dimension that ICE drivers never have to factor in.

But I still don't bother going below the speed limit most of the time because it just doesn't fit my driving comfort level in relation to the flow of traffic around me. I hate getting squeezed behind slow trucks which often happens a lot if I'm going a little under the speed limit (cars edging along a little faster passing me and the truck). I just find that frustrating, so I usually do the speed limit and bump it up a little higher while passing so I don't squeeze others coming up behind me.
I'm no speed demon. I keep it right around the speed limit (usually 80 when it's 80, 77 when it's 75, 68 when it's 65). For the most part, enjoying the long drive means more to me than saving a few minutes or a few dollars throughout the day.

If there's almost no traffic on the interstate, sometimes I will slow it down a bit for better efficiency. But that's so rare anymore, even out here in the wide open west. It usually becomes a constant game of having to pass slow trucks and watching for cars coming up from behind to avoid getting squeezed. I'm not passive enough to just sit there behind a truck, even though ACC handles it well.

And then of course there's the trucks passing other trucks, one going 65 and the other 65.5. 😤
 
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But I still don't bother going below the speed limit most of the time because it just doesn't fit my driving comfort level in relation to the flow of traffic around me. I hate getting squeezed behind slow trucks which often happens a lot if I'm going a little under the speed limit (cars edging along a little faster passing me and the truck). I just find that frustrating, so I usually do the speed limit and bump it up a little higher while passing so I don't squeeze others coming up behind me.
I'm no speed demon. I keep it right around the speed limit (usually 80 when it's 80, 77 when it's 75, 68 when it's 65). For the most part, enjoying the long drive means more to me than saving a few minutes or a few dollars throughout the day.
Oh, totally, and I don't have any intention of suggesting that someone else drive my style. I found that I'm far less frustrated at my speed, in part because I was always internally yelling at some "jerk" to move over when I was trying to pass. Once I stopped that, I realized I was enjoying my road trips so very much more.

I don't stay at 73 and never change speeds--if I'm bored with where I am in traffic, I have no problem punching it up to 90 to pass a few cars, but then I'll let it drop back down to 73. "Speed inflation" is something I used to find myself caught up in and one day I realized it just doesn't get me there any faster and it's not any more enjoyable of a ride.

But I know others find my speed wrong for them and that's totally fine. It's why we have individual cars.

If there's almost no traffic on the interstate, sometimes I will slow it down a bit for better efficiency. But that's so rare anymore, even out here in the wide open west. It usually becomes a constant game of having to pass slow trucks and watching for cars coming up from behind to avoid getting squeezed. I'm not passive enough to just sit there behind a truck, even though ACC handles it well.

And then of course there's the trucks passing other trucks, one going 65 and the other 65.5. 😤
Yeah, the I-40 used to be a wide open highway, but now there are almost never any lonely places left on it. I'll sometimes take a slower/different route just to find that empty road again.

And we have those truckers too. That's so very frustrating.
 

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We just got home from our trip to Death Valley. When we plugged in at home, the odometer read 33,467.

Tomorrow marks the end of year two of our ownership of the Mustang and the beginning of year three.

Most of the 33,500 miles we've put on the Mustang were road trip miles, where a road trip is ill-defined. I think it requires a few hundred miles and probably an overnight stay somewhere that's not home before I'm convinced it's really a road trip. A day trip where we go a couple hundred miles away and then a couple hundred miles home isn't what I would consider truly a "road trip." Example: A trip from our home to the Grand Canyon and back, following our preferred route, is about 220 miles. I don't think of that as a road trip, but rather as a day trip.

On 24 February, 2022, we picked up the Mustang at the dealer that's about 65 miles from home. We ascended about 3000 feet in elevation from a clear, warm, beautiful day into a cloudy, stormy afternoon. We got home, charged up, used the car for a couple of days around town, and then headed out on our first day trip to the Grand Canyon. It was a cold day with snow flurries on our way up to the Grand Canyon and on our way home. We didn't bother to charge at the Canyon--220 miles was easily within the range we expected to get from the Mustang.

A week or so later, we took our first road trip to the Los Angeles area (1100 miles round trip). On that trip, we did have a bit of range anxiety. First, we left in a snow storm, so it was cold, blowing wind, icy roads, etc. But the car handled it all just fine. What really got to us, though, was a wind storm across the Mojave desert. We arrived at our final DCFC charger with 20% or so remaining feeling stressed. A remaining charge of 20% isn't something I would even blink at now. We had dinner at a restaurant nearby while the vehicle charged and then continued our trip into the LA valley.

Since that first road trip, we've taken the Mustang all over the southwest and west coast, including:
Albuquerque, Amarillo, Anaheim, Austin, Bakersfield, Barstow, Blythe, Cameron, Camp Verde, Caverns of Sonora, Death Valley, Denton, Desolation Flats, El Paso, Erick, Flagstaff, Fredericksburg, Fresno, Gallup, Glendora, Globe, Grand Canyon, Grants, Henderson, Holbrook, Houston, Indio, Junction, Kingman, Las Cruces, Las Vegas, Long Beach, Modesto, Monterey, Muir Woods, Needles, Pahrump, Painted Desert, Palm Springs, Palo Cedro, Pasadena, Payson, Petrified Forest, Phoenix, Prescott, Redding, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Jose, Santa Barbara, Sedona, Tempe, Tucson, Tucumcari, Tusayan, Village of Oak Creek, Wichita Falls, Williams, (Don't forget) Winona, Winslow, Verde Valley,
And so many places in between.

It's a fantastic road trip vehicle and we have had fewer issues with it than many of our other vehicles we've owned.

Here's a map of our travels.

Screenshot 2024-02-23 at 18.25.39.png


Some random statistics:
Number of unexpected repairs: Three, twice fixing the rattling tail lights and one fix to a flat tire.
Highest elevation attained: 8050 ft
Lowest elevation attained: -252 ft
Steepest slope driven up (as far as I know): 15% grade
Longest road trip: ~2600 miles
Most elevation gain/loss in one road trip: 34,147/-34,147 ft.
Mode most often driven in: Engage, 1PD
Lowest State of Charge seen on the display: 4%
Deepest snow driven through: about 18" over about 0.25 miles before we got to where the plow starts/stops.
Road trip we haven't done yet that we would like to do: North Rim of the Grand Canyon--there's no DCFC on our normal route, there's no destination charger at the places we like to camp, and it's a 220 mile one-way trip. We would want either a destination charger at the North Rim or a DCFC about 3/4 of the way from our home.

Here are the things we don't like about the car:

  • HVAC controls are soft buttons on a screen rather than physical. This is still annoying after two years;
  • The tail lights have rattled loose twice because of our washboard gravel road. The first time; the dealer "fixed" it at our 10,000 mile service ($27.00). They didn't fix it, so I fixed it the second time with a dab of blue loctite on the threads;
  • I don't like the glass roof. My partner does. I am prone to car sickness and when we drive in an area with shadows, the flickering in my peripheral vision causes me some nausea;
  • The large screen interface is slower than I would like;
  • The Ford navigation is middling at best. We sometimes use it because it has some nice features, but mostly we use it when we know we want to precondition the battery before DCFC. Even then we often ignore its directions and go the way that makes sense.
  • The range estimation is often way too conservative for my tastes;
  • The range estimation doesn't have a clear algorithm that would help me understand it better, so I just do my own estimating;
  • There's a bug/poor programming decision in the miles/kWh calculation that means that high efficiency is badly calculated and gives a strangely quantized set of vallues (see below);
  • It was expensive enough that we couldn't afford two;
  • After more than about 2 hours in the driver's seat, I find it's a bit uncomfortable (I'm 6'1" and not a svelt person);
  • There's more road noise than I would like. It's different from a gas car, but it's still enough to get tiring after a long day on the road;
  • Maybe some other things, but none are coming to mind.

Is it a perfect car? Far from it. Is it a great car? I think so. This is the year I'd like to go all-electric and never have to stop at a gas station again (except to fuel my tractor, because I cannot afford an electric tractor just yet). We're putting together the savings for a Rivian or Lightning...

There are a lot of things we love about the car. It's fun to drive. It's all electric. We can refuel it overnight at home, at a hotel, and often at friend's and family's houses. It's a fantastic road trip car. I think that probably the only vehicle that was better for road tripping was our Sienna, but that was a minivan and in a completely different class. If there was an all-electric Sienna, we might trade the Mustang for that (probably not, but we would very seriously consider it).

After 33,500 miles, we've spent about $50 on maintenance. For the first 10,000 mile maintenance service, my partner drove three hours round trip and paid $27 to the dealer. After that, I took care of the second and third routine maintenance myself. We bought new wiper blades and new washer fluid. And... That's about it. A total of about $50. In the same ~30,000 miles, we've had to pay a total of about $3,000, or an average of $500 for every 5000 miles service interval for the Tacoma.

Our overall average efficiency is around 3.4 miles/kWh (mpk). When we've spent some time at home, this number creeps up into the 4.5 and higher, sometimes we've seen it up around 5-6 mpk for a week or two in the early and late summer. In the winter, the efficiency, the battery max capacity, and thus the range are all impacted, but we only get down to around 0 ºF in the coldest days (I've measured the air temperature at -15 ºF at night, but we're not usually driving at night).

We have massive elevation changes for every road trip we do. We live at ~7,000 feet elevation, and nearly every direction is down, which one might imagine is great for efficiency, but coming back up that mountain means more losses than gains. Still, with around 3.4 mpk, I can't really complain.

While driving around Death Valley, we climbed up from -252 feet elevation to 5700 feet elevation and then we drove back down. On the drive down, I noticed that after you get above about 6 miles/kWh, the efficiency numbers reported by the vehicle become very quantized. I only saw 12.4 mpk, 15.5 mpk, and 20.7 mpk. Nothing in between. This is likely due to an error in the logic used to calculate or report these numbers: A large number (miles) divided by a small number (kWh) can lead to this weird behavior when both of the numbers and the result are stored in a small memory register. I don't know for certain this is what's happening. Whatever is happening, it's certainly curious behavior and a programming update could fix it. I still trust the lower numbers since I've double- and triple-checked their accuracy many times while on road trips.

By this point (~30,000 miles), I'm usually inured to the vehicle's charms and have just become annoyed with its problems. I still find myself looking for reasons to take the Mustang on a drive. I've even chosen it over my motorcycle more than once when I just wanted to get out on the road, even though the day was perfect for a motorcycle ride.

I have a yearly meeting in the Houston area. I took the Mustang last year and am seriously considering taking it again this year. It's a 2600 mile round trip and takes two extra days of travel to do, but it's so much more enjoyable than flying.

Some things I wish the Mustang had:

  • A 120 Volt outlet in both the frunk and in the back of the vehicle. It's inane that Ford didn't include these;
  • Either an option to delete the glass roof or a way to close and open an opaque cover. We have an aftermarket cover, but it's dumb that there isn't one built in;
  • A full-sized spare--the repair kit isn't good enough and I'm not a fan of putting stop-leak in my TPMS valve stems;
  • Physical HVAC controls. I use muscle memory to adjust certain things and that includes the tactile feedback of having physical controls;
  • I wish the rear seats laid flat instead of angled--it would be a lot easier to camp in this with flat seats;
  • I would love longer range and faster charging, but what's available on the Mustang has done me just fine for 33,500 miles, so it's not like the configuration as-is is a deal breaker for me;
  • More of the OBD-II information displayed on the screen. I'd like to know power going to the motor(s), power going to and coming from the battery, and a pile of other data. I don't want to clutter up my view with aftermarket tablets, phones, or whatever--just give me a way to display this.
Some photos (some repeats from previous posts):

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We appreciate you sharing your experience with us. Thank you for being part of the Ford Family and here's to many more road trips in your Mach-E.
 

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It was expensive enough that we couldn't afford two;
I bought a GTPE last September as a birthday present to myself. My partner loves it so much he wants one now. Maybe a slightly used premium is in our near future.
Also, we love road tripping in it.
Cheers.
 


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I bought a GTPE last September as a birthday present to myself. My partner loves it so much he wants one now. Maybe a slightly used premium is in our near future.
Also, we love road tripping in it.
Cheers.
We're saving up for a Lightning or Rivian. I thought we were ready this year, but even with the price cuts, we have too many other financial priorities to trade in our working-just-fine (though still gas-guzzling) Tacoma. I think we'll be able to do it in a year or so.
 

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We're saving up for a Lightning or Rivian. I thought we were ready this year, but even with the price cuts, we have too many other financial priorities to trade in our working-just-fine (though still gas-guzzling) Tacoma. I think we'll be able to do it in a year or so.
Love to hear more about your EV experiences.
 

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We're saving up for a Lightning or Rivian. I thought we were ready this year, but even with the price cuts, we have too many other financial priorities to trade in our working-just-fine (though still gas-guzzling) Tacoma. I think we'll be able to do it in a year or so.
By the way, our other car is a 2015 Silverado that we’re trying to come up with a replacement plan for. I want an EV truck that’s practical for work truck things with good range but does not cost $70k.
 
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By the way, our other car is a 2015 Silverado that we’re trying to come up with a replacement plan for. I want an EV truck that’s practical for work truck things with good range but does not cost $70k.
That's what I want too. The Lightning is close right now with the discounts. But I couldn't pencil it just the way I wanted it, so we'll try again some time in the not-too-far future. We use the truck around the ranch, for camping, and all kinds of other things. We do a lot of remote travel. With the 320 mile range on the extended range pack, the Lightning is just at the bottom of the range I want.
 

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That's what I want too. The Lightning is close right now with the discounts. But I couldn't pencil it just the way I wanted it, so we'll try again some time in the not-too-far future. We use the truck around the ranch, for camping, and all kinds of other things. We do a lot of remote travel. With the 320 mile range on the extended range pack, the Lightning is just at the bottom of the range I want.
Especially when you hook up the horse trailer. The range will probably be cut in half. It can't replace my Powerstroke F350 to haul hay, horses and cattle.
 

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This has been a useful review and thread since my wife and I are trying to decide whether to trade up from a Ford Escape Hybrid to a Mach-E. One thing we worry about is charging away from home. In these miles and days you put in, how many times did you get to a charger and find it was broken, blocked by an ICE, in use by another EV, unable to communicate with the car, etc.? Thanks.
 

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This has been a useful review and thread since my wife and I are trying to decide whether to trade up from a Ford Escape Hybrid to a Mach-E. One thing we worry about is charging away from home. In these miles and days you put in, how many times did you get to a charger and find it was broken, blocked by an ICE, in use by another EV, unable to communicate with the car, etc.? Thanks.
We've done almost 40,000 road trip miles in ours. Most of our DCFC charging is done at EA. They do frequently have 1-2 problem chargers at any given station. But the saving grace for EA is their redundancy. Nearly every station has 4 or more chargers (usually just 4). As long as the station isn't busy, we usually have no problem. Maybe 30% of the time we find an issue trying to start the charge on the first attempt, but it just means we slide over to the next charger. In rare cases, it takes a 3rd. Only 2% of the time did we arrive at a station and fail to get a charge at all because it was full, or totally broken down. Another 2% of the time we had to settle for a seriously de-rated charger (31kW). All the rest were reasonable though (not always full power but decent enough).

But it depends a lot on what routes you travel, and when (we usually avoid peak travel times). Some routes are better than others. I plan all my DCFC stops at home first and check out the recent station comments on Plugshare to see if there's been major problems, and plan around that station if possible. As a general rule, I charge up to 80% (or more) every DCFC to keep plenty of safety buffer in case I run into a problem station. I always try to leave enough in the "tank" to reach a backup DCFC station just in case, even if it means still having 30-40% left when arriving for my next charge. When it doubt, charge early. Target the 2nd-to-last DCFC in range, not the LAST one.
 
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This has been a useful review and thread since my wife and I are trying to decide whether to trade up from a Ford Escape Hybrid to a Mach-E. One thing we worry about is charging away from home. In these miles and days you put in, how many times did you get to a charger and find it was broken, blocked by an ICE, in use by another EV, unable to communicate with the car, etc.? Thanks.
I want to be clear: The following all exceptions to our experience, not our normal experience. According to my quick scan of my records, I've charged on public chargers at least 100 times in the past two years, but I believe I've done more than that--I don't have records for the one-off or "off brand" chargers I've used on some of the longer trips. Well, I do, but they're not at my fingertips at the moment.


I will list the biggest issues we've had:

  • The Quartszite EA charger is both unreliable and oversubscribed, with 4 total plugs and often a long line. We stopped there once and waited about 45 minutes before we got our turn to charge. It was a hot summer day and the charger had been in use for likely most of the day. We got a very slow charge. Now we skip Quartszite entirely when we travel on the I10. Our biggest mistake here was not reading the PlugShare reviews. If we had, we would have stopped earlier and then skipped this charger.
  • A trip to far northern CA we encountered two flakey chargers in a row. Both EA, both very old, and both with lines from renters who didn't know what they were doing. We skip those now and choose newer chargers.
  • The Kingman EA chargers have started to get very busy and are sometimes slow, but usually they're just fine. We can often skip them or charge for only a short time before moving on.
  • In the very early days, in some out-of-the-way places with bad internet service, we have had trouble with the system not connecting to verify payment quickly enough that the car doesn't time out. Now I always start my charge session before plugging in the car, despite what EA suggests on their screens.
  • I have seen more Teslas blocking chargers than ICEs. This is even more annoying because they should know better. But the total number of times? In my travels, I'd say probably a total of no more than six spots. Once it was 3/4 spots blocked by Teslas that weren't charging.
  • There was a public L2 charger in one town that had had its entire cable cut off. That was weird. Also not a necessary charge. The entire area was weird, though, so I don't know if it was really about the charger or just the area.
In my experience, the biggest issue is that there are some "hubs" where a charging station is about the only option for some of the lower-range vehicles and those get really busy. But most of them are not busy for the entire day, just during specific surges. One thing we've learned to do is arrive at a different time than everyone else so the line, if there is one, is much shorter. With the opening up of some Tesla Superchargers, this will provide some pressure relief, but it won't solve it everywhere.

I'll note that I've run into similar issues on holidays with our ICE truck. The last time we towed our trailer we ended up having to skip two gas stations and were running on fumes when we finally found a station that wasn't full of angry, fighting holiday travelers.

All but one of the interactions I've had at EV charging stations have been pleasant. The "unpleasant" interaction was just some guy who was angry and in a hurry decided he wanted the charger before me even though there was a clear line. I let him have it. I'm too old to care.
 

CameraCarl

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Thanks for taking the time to reply. Here in Minnesota there have been reports of people cutting off charging cables (possibly to sell the metals) and in one rural community someone took a sledge hammer to the charging station. I just don't understand......
 
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SpaceEVDriver

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Especially when you hook up the horse trailer. The range will probably be cut in half. It can't replace my Powerstroke F350 to haul hay, horses and cattle.
If you're hauling enough mass to need an F-350 with a PowerStroke, there's no BEV currently rated to tow what that F-350 can tow, so I'm not sure it's a like-like comparison. I neither need nor want a 14,000-20,000 pound towing capacity.

For the things I do with a truck, a Lightning or a R1T has plenty of capability. The R1T has the better range, a nicer ride, but a heftier price tag. The Lightning does meet my range requirements (even when towing), but it's bigger and less capable off-road. Either one is far superior—for my needs—to a PowerStroke.
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