What is the normal percentage of charge to get 300 miles range on ER RWD?

ChasingCoral

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Agree on technical grounds. But it's also supported by marketing. Given that range is desirable from a consumer prospective, if Ford Marketing thought it could market 325 miles of range rather than 300 miles of range it would be hard not to make it so.
However, we have seen Ford repeatedly underpromise and overdeliver on specifications. I think Ford is being very conservative on their EPA figures. They could probably have pushed that envelope by using fudge factors like Tesla did but have stuck with the basics for now. They may increase it later with more real-world data.
 

Louv

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The 11% unused “capacity” is not a conspiracy.
It’s not marketing.
It’s engineering.
It’s been going on since your first iPod.

It what every manufacturer does to protect the batteries from damage. Especially important because damage to Lithium ion batteries can result in fire. And you don’t want fire, do you?

It’s what you were supposed to do with lead acid batteries, but there the protected capacity should have been 50%, but lead acid batteries never had sophisticated measurements or protections. You just had a linear chart of voltage to remaining capacity.

As others have said, go do some research on lithium ion batteries, measurements techniques, cell leveling, SoC, temperature, BMS, to understand why you won’t be “unlocking more capacity later”.

...Unless you are experimenting with battery failure scenarios. And fire.
 

JayTee

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The 11% unused “capacity” is not a conspiracy.
It’s not marketing.
It’s engineering.
It’s been going on since your first iPod.

It what every manufacturer does to protect the batteries from damage. Especially important because damage to Lithium ion batteries can result in fire. And you don’t want fire, do you?

It’s what you were supposed to do with lead acid batteries, but there the protected capacity should have been 50%, but lead acid batteries never had sophisticated measurements or protections. You just had a linear chart of voltage to remaining capacity.

As others have said, go do some research on lithium ion batteries, measurements techniques, cell leveling, SoC, temperature, BMS, to understand why you won’t be “unlocking more capacity later”.

...Unless you are experimenting with battery failure scenarios. And fire.

Who are you talking to?
 

Louv

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Who are you talking to?
Anyone coming to read this thread, and has little or no experience with EVs and Lithium battery tech. Or anyone who thinks they will somehow code the car to give them access to that "extra" 11%.

Not directed at folks who are also answering the same questions.
 

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