What would make you cancel your Mach-E reservation and buy something else?

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silverelan

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1. Most important is cost of on-the-road charging. Unless Ford states and guarantees we will have charging rates (through EA I guess) of no more that $0.30 a kWh and no charge-by-time obviously, I am out. Period.
You don't have to use EA. You can visit any DCFC station you please. SoCal is littered with DCFC stations from various providers but if you're like most owners, 80-95% of your miles will be from your garage outlet.

If all you do is long range driving though, the Mach-E might not be the best choice for you. Ford offers the Escape PHEV and Fusion Energi PHEV if you'd prefer.
 

CA Grant

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That strikes me as an unfair analogy.

I'm considering buying the Mustang Mach-E, knowing that 99.9% of charging will occur at home.

I'm considering Electrify America (and all of the other charging networks) as an extra benefit that may enable certain road trips. On those rare trips, I'd happily pay their current rates.
I believe it's only unfair if your road trips are very infrequent. I have a Tesla 3 and my road trips, while not too frequent, would be a nightmare if it wern't for Supercharging - you would sit for hours at not-supercharging stations. Further, the thought of paying (say) $0.45 a kWh when an equivilant car (Tesla) would have been $0.28 would be like the feeling I have when I leave Barstow CA (gas maybe $3.50 gal) and drive up the hiway to Furnace Creek at Death Valley National Park where gas is maybe $7.50 gal. Honestly it would make me question why I bought this $55,000 e-Mustang in the first place !
 

mark360

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I believe it's only unfair if your road trips are very infrequent. I have a Tesla 3 and my road trips, while not too frequent, would be a nightmare if it wern't for Supercharging - you would sit for hours at not-supercharging stations. Further, the thought of paying (say) $0.45 a kWh when an equivilant car (Tesla) would have been $0.28 would be like the feeling I have when I leave Barstow CA (gas maybe $3.50 gal) and drive up the hiway to Furnace Creek at Death Valley National Park where gas is maybe $7.50 gal. Honestly it would make me question why I bought this $55,000 e-Mustang in the first place !
For a 45 minute charge:

Tesla charges .28c/kw to supercharge. That's about $17 to fill up (Model 3). The Mach E will be about $33 to fill up on an EA charger @ an average charge rate of .69c/min (47 minutes). Assume 20% of the time you're driving on road trips out of the 15,000 miles per year. Cost difference is this:

3,000 miles need to be DC fast charging
Ignoring each car's efficiency:
Tesla Model 3 would need 723KW - $203
Mach E would need 870KW - $487

So the difference is $285.00 per year. Hardly anything to write home about when comparing cost for costs, and I assumed the Mach E is 20% less efficient than a Tesla. If the Model Y and Mach E had the same efficiency, the price difference is even less by 20%.

Yes it will also cost more to charge it at home, but we're comparing a model 3 to a Mach E. The Mach E is more in line with the Model X/Y. A Toyota Prius is the cheapest gas car to drive, doesn't mean people wanna buy one. As more charging networks come out, the price will come down with supply.

Lets not forget a year ago Tesla tried to raise the rates to .36c/KW but faced huge backlash for that very reason, the price starts getting closer to gasoline. They will go up again eventually!
 
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