Will the Mach E use the same chargers as Tesla models?

eponyinIL

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Confused about how the charging stations are going to work. Are all of the electric vehicles going to have compatible chargers or is it going to be an Android / Apple situation where you have to have the brand specific charger and charging station for your vehicle?
 

Thevanin

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opennetus

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My understanding is Tesla cars can use any charging station. Non-Tesla cars can use all charging stations except for Tesla Super Chargers, which is still enough coverage for the vast majority of road trips. Tesla clearly "wins" when it comes to charging station access, but keep in mind most electric car owners rarely use charging stations and there is good reason to avoid using them on a regular basis. They are much more expensive than home charging and faster charging puts more stress on car batteries, which can impact their lifespans. Also, it is just less convenient. Regardless of how fast the charge rate is, you still have to sit around for a bit but if you charge at home, it takes just two seconds to plug in. Even when using a charging station, you should only charge up enough to get home or to the next charging station since the charge speed drops dramatically as the State of Charge increases and for all the other reasons above.

So basically, superior charging station access only really matters if your normal commutes requires a fast charger or you frequently go on long road trips, in which case I think you should seriously consider Tesla as they are clearly better for fast charging. If you are unable to do home charging... you are probably better off with a hybrid.
 

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My understanding is Tesla cars can use any charging station. Non-Tesla cars can use all charging stations except for Tesla Super Chargers, which is still enough coverage for the vast majority of road trips. Tesla clearly "wins" when it comes to charging station access, but keep in mind most electric car owners rarely use charging stations and there is good reason to avoid using them on a regular basis. They are much more expensive than home charging and faster charging puts more stress on car batteries, which can impact their lifespans. Also, it is just less convenient. Regardless of how fast the charge rate is, you still have to sit around for a bit but if you charge at home, it takes just two seconds to plug in. Even when using a charging station, you should only charge up enough to get home or to the next charging station since the charge speed drops dramatically as the State of Charge increases and for all the other reasons above.

So basically, superior charging station access only really matters if your normal commutes requires a fast charger or you frequently go on long road trips, in which case I think you should seriously consider Tesla as they are clearly better for fast charging. If you are unable to do home charging... you are probably better off with a hybrid.
Tesla's have an adapter so they can use J1772 chargers. They can't use DCFC since they have their own superchargers (at least I don't think they have an adapter for DCFC chargers).
 

RyZt

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For home charger (or slow public charger), there are two kinds. Tesla uses Tesla connector, all other brands uses J1772 connector (standard).
* You can connect Tesla car to standard charger using an adapter Tesla provides for free ($95 for replacement/spare).
* You can connect non-Tesla car to Tesla charger using 3rd party adapter ($180-$220).

For DC fast charger, there are 3 kinds. Tesla uses Tesla connector. Nissan uses ChaDeMo connector. All others uses CCS connector.
* Tesla cars (in US) can use Tesla or ChaDeMo ($450 adapter). Tesla in Europe can additionally use CCS (cars have two ports).
* Nissan cars can only use ChaDeMo.
* All others can only use CCS.
Notes:
* Tesla superchargers are exclusive to Tesla cars.
* 3rd party public DCFC generally provides multiple CCS and a small number (1 most likely, may be 0 or 2) of ChaDeMo (which is capped at 50kW even if the CCS charging rate is higher).
* I've seen news report of 3rd party providing Tesla DCFC. That's super rare. Just consider it not available.
 

ClaudeMach-E

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Tesla's have an adapter so they can use J1772 chargers. They can't use DCFC since they have their own superchargers (at least I don't think they have an adapter for DCFC chargers).
They can use DCFC with a Chademo adapter which is very expensive, for home wall charger I believe they have a J1772 adapter, but if you have a Tesla wall charger with their own type connector you cannot use it on any other EV with this J1772 connector.
 

opennetus

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Oh, thanks for the corrections. I thought Tesla had adapters for all the common types; I was wrong. It is hard to predict how things will be, even in the relatively near future. It is possible Tesla will make more adapters or strike deals to add Tesla plugs in more places, like third party charging stations. It is also possible that more non-Tesla charging stations will popup, particularly as more Car Companies start producing EVs on a larger scale. I still think that, in general, charging station access is not as important as many people predict.
 

ChasingCoral

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For home charger (or slow public charger), there are two kinds. Tesla uses Tesla connector, all other brands uses J1772 connector (standard).
* You can connect Tesla car to standard charger using an adapter Tesla provides for free ($95 for replacement/spare).
* You can connect non-Tesla car to Tesla charger using 3rd party adapter ($180-$220).

For DC fast charger, there are 3 kinds. Tesla uses Tesla connector. Nissan uses ChaDeMo connector. All others uses CCS connector.
* Tesla cars (in US) can use Tesla or ChaDeMo ($450 adapter). Tesla in Europe can additionally use CCS (cars have two ports).
* Nissan cars can only use ChaDeMo.
* All others can only use CCS.
Notes:
* Tesla superchargers are exclusive to Tesla cars.
* 3rd party public DCFC generally provides multiple CCS and a small number (1 most likely, may be 0 or 2) of ChaDeMo (which is capped at 50kW even if the CCS charging rate is higher).
* I've seen news report of 3rd party providing Tesla DCFC. That's super rare. Just consider it not available.
Plus North America uses CCS-1 and the rest of the world uses CCS-2.
 

dbsb3233

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I think it's only a matter of time before they all eventually migrate to a single standard (probably CCS-1 in North America). Even Tesla (begrudgingly). They ended up being the Betamax of charging connectors. Choosing the proprietary path rather than the open source path will end up making them the losers in the charging wars if they don't eventually switch. Probably won't happen until mid-decade though.
 

zhackwyatt

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I think it's only a matter of time before they all eventually migrate to a single standard (probably CCS-1 in North America). Even Tesla (begrudgingly). They ended up being the Betamax of charging connectors. Choosing the proprietary path rather than the open source path will end up making them the losers in the charging wars if they don't eventually switch. Probably won't happen until mid-decade though.
Wasn't that because there was no standard at the time they were rolling out?
 

timbop

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I think it's only a matter of time before they all eventually migrate to a single standard (probably CCS-1 in North America). Even Tesla (begrudgingly). They ended up being the Betamax of charging connectors. Choosing the proprietary path rather than the open source path will end up making them the losers in the charging wars if they don't eventually switch. Probably won't happen until mid-decade though.
I think they'll adapt rather than switch. In Europe they have CCS-2 and proprietary connecters, and there is the aforementioned Chademo-tesla adapter. It would make sense for Musk to add CCS-1 connectors as standard here in the US, but as you said that won't happen until the CCS charging networks in NA start to become serious competitors.
 

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@eponyinIL, your Mustang Mach-E will use basically any station that's not Tesla. There over 3000 fast charging stations in the USA & Canada compared to ~930 Tesla stations.

Watch the video explanation that @hybrid2bev linked to for a great explanation on EV charging.

Tesla has now added 3rd Party chargers to their in-car nav system. This hints that additional charger support is coming. Their current CHAdeMO adapter is limited to just 50kW but their European CCS adapters can do 140kW.

US Department of Energy DC Fast Charger locator
Fastned Tesla CCS adapter blogpost
 

ClaudeMach-E

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I think it's only a matter of time before they all eventually migrate to a single standard (probably CCS-1 in North America). Even Tesla (begrudgingly). They ended up being the Betamax of charging connectors. Choosing the proprietary path rather than the open source path will end up making them the losers in the charging wars if they don't eventually switch. Probably won't happen until mid-decade though.
I'm not to sure about CCS 1 or CCS 2 becoming the standard, what will be important though is that it should permit power flow in both directions, so you can use your car has a power source for your house in case of a power breakdown in your area , and or a power to grid source like the chademo can do. By the way some wall chargers are all ready for that, they are only waiting for the standard to be finalize.
 

timbop

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I'm not to sure about CCS 1 or CCS 2 becoming the standard, what will be important though is that it should permit power flow in both directions, so you can use your car has a power source for your house in case of a power breakdown in your area , and or a power to grid source like the chademo can do. By the way some wall chargers are all ready for that, they are only waiting for the standard to be finalize.
CCS 2 IS already the standard in europe, and CCS 1 is the defacto standard in the US - other than tesla and some Nissans, everyone else uses CCS 1. The difference between CCS 1 and 2 is that the service in the US is half the voltage of Europe.
 



 








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