Bipartisan Charging Bill

Jimrpa

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The United States has been operating small, safe, modular nuclear power plants for over 50 years. All of them owned by the United States Navy. I know, I am a retired nuclear engineer that served on submarines. If the civilian nuclear industry was run the way the Navy runs it's nuclear plants there would be no issues. Instead, waste, fraud, and excessive red tape has kneecapped the civilian industry. Yes, nuclear waste is produced and must be disposed of/stored until it can decay. That was what Yucca Mountain was for....instead, regulators screwed that up also. The amount of nuclear waste is miniscule compared to the sludge, ash, and carbon waste of conventional oil and coal power plants. Burning coal releases much more nuclear isotopes into the air than a nuclear power plant does. Three mile island was a freak accident. Chernobyl was a design and manmade accident waiting to happen from the start. It is too bad that these two incidents ruined nuclear power.
I believe the USN reactors are LWR?Those are great for submarines. They’re actually a suboptimal solution for commercial power generation. A long time ago, the US had a prototype molten salt reactor running, which has a lot of technical and practical advantages. Sadly, “big nuclear” at the time (GE/Westinghouse) wanted to build LWR because they were already building them for other applications (for those who don’t know, molten salt reactors have an interesting “fail safe” mode. It’s totally passive. If the salt loop “overheats”, a salt plug melts and the salt loop dumps into a cooling pit where it basically freezes pretty much instantly. A “Chernobyl or Fukushima is impossible because of the way the reactor works).
i ❤ as part of a balanced renewable, environmentally sound energy production portfolio 😀
 

NCSolarFarmer

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I am all for the charging bill which extends Subsection (g) of section 30C of the IRC. Realize, though, that 26 U.S. Code § 30C - Alternative fuel vehicle refueling property credit does not apply to property installed on/at a personal residence.

For a business installing a DC Fast Charger on their place of business, for instance, the bill changes the IRC $30,000 credit cap to a $200,000 cap and extends the credit termination date to 2028. The bill makes no changes to depreciation or recapture rules, and basis is reduced by the claimed credit amount just like all ITC projects.

This bill, if enacted, will be a 'big deal' and incentivize DC Fast Charger implementation. The old alt. refueling/charging ITC has expired - it ended at the end of 2020.
 

timbop

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I am all for the charging bill which extends Subsection (g) of section 30C of the IRC. Realize, though, that 26 U.S. Code § 30C - Alternative fuel vehicle refueling property credit does not apply to property installed on/at a personal residence.

For a business installing a DC Fast Charger on their place of business, for instance, the bill changes the IRC $30,000 credit cap to a $200,000 cap and extends the credit termination date to 2028. The bill makes no changes to depreciation or recapture rules, and basis is reduced by the claimed credit amount just like all ITC projects.

This bill, if enacted, will be a 'big deal' and incentivize DC Fast Charger implementation. The old alt. refueling/charging ITC has expired - it ended at the end of 2020.
That bill looks like it died last may
 

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