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Can you charge Mach-E with NEMA 6-50 plug?

Blinkin

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I'd instead recommend something like the Grizzl-E. I also just ordered mine. It's only $399 (granted it's still a lot), but if you order prior to the end of 2020, you can claim a 30% tax credit. Hard to beat for $279. That way you don't have to worry about plugging / unplugging the Ford Mobile Charger when you want to take it with you...

and I wouldn't be certain that the Ford Mobile Charger will work with that adapter. The NEMA 14-50 plug that it comes with provides BOTH 240 V and 120 V compared to the NEMA 6-50 only providing 240 V as the missing prong is the neutral line used to get 120 V.

Last point is that the Ford Mobile Charger recommends a GFCI breaker which you might not have, but the Grizzl-E (and other EVSE chargers) don't need as they have an internal one.
These are good points. Thanks for the thoughts. I might just look into the EVSE solution. I had my eye on a clipper creek one too. The breaker point may be the thing that changes my mind.
 

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I'm new to Electric Vehicles. I assume the car will manage the charge rate and when to stop charging?
Yes, the car and EV charger 'negotiate' the charge rate. When you plug in an EV charger, the EV charger tells the car what the max charge rate it supports is, but the car ultimately dictates what current it takes from the charger. The car charge rate is also not constant. It will pull more current when the battery is near empty, but will charge much slower when the battery is near full.

If interested, here's a good explanation of what an EV charger is and how it works at a basic level. You can see why I don't understand why they're so expensive beyond the cost of the cabling which is probably the most expensive single piece.

 

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These are good points. Thanks for the thoughts. I might just look into the EVSE solution. I had my eye on a clipper creek one too. The breaker point may be the thing that changes my mind.
The breaker was a big point for me as well. A GFCI breaker costs about $100 more than a non-GFCI breaker. So really, the Grizzl-E costs about $179 assuming you don't already have a GFCI breaker. And that way I don't have to worry about forgetting the mobile charger at home if I need it while I'm out (which hopefully never happens sans road trips).
 

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Last point is that the Ford Mobile Charger recommends a GFCI breaker which you might not have
Are you confident that Ford Mobile Charger doesn't have GFCI built in? I have assumed that all EVSEs do.

It would be even better if you can provide a source for that.
 

methorian

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Are you confident that Ford Mobile Charger doesn't have GFCI built in?

It would be even better if you can provide a source for that.
Per the official Ford install instructions, the mobile charger recommends a GFCI circuit.

I do not know why the EVSE itself wouldn't have GFCI integrated - especially being mobile and potentially used outdoors.
 

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CHeil402

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Per the official Ford install instructions, the mobile charger recommends a GFCI circuit.

I do not know why the EVSE itself wouldn't have GFCI integrated - especially being mobile and potentially used outdoors.

They don't include it on the Mobile Charger to save on cost/complexity and because the 2020 NEC (electrical code) requires outlets to have a GFCI breaker. So it should already be protected at the outlet.
 

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They don't include it on the Mobile Charger to save on cost/complexity and because the 2020 NEC (electrical code) requires outlets to have a GFCI breaker. So it should already be protected at the outlet.
That's the 2020 code, which isn't in place in a majority of states (as far as I'm aware, I know my state/locality is still on 2014), and certainly wasn't enforced for all of the existing 14-50 outlets. Just seems weird to me, but I have no experience with other mobile EVSE's.
 

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That's the 2020 code, which isn't in place in a majority of states (as far as I'm aware, I know my state/locality is still on 2014), and certainly wasn't enforced for all of the existing 14-50 outlets. Just seems weird to me, but I have no experience with other mobile EVSE's.
This is definately an example of the NEC and industry trying to play catch-up with each other. You want a GFCI, but you also don't want two in series. The NEC is assuming if you use a plug, you won't have one. The industry provides them for hardwired chargers (as is needed for certification), but is still in a gray area for plug-based situations. If the outlet has it, you don't want it and vice-versa.
 

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Certainly - Ford's included Mobile Charger only includes a 14-50 plug, they may eventually offer a 6-50, but no current plans that I'm aware of.

Many aftermarket EVSE's have a 6-50 plug option. (I recommend checking out the Grizzl-E.)
You certainly can get a 14-50(Female) to 6-50 (Male)adapter for the mobile charger and you can certainly get an EVSE with a 6-50 plug.
 

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If you don’t have anything that requires the continued use of the 6-50 outlet, I would just swap it for a 14-50 outlet. Very easy to do.
Only if the wiring going to that plug would be compatible with a 14-50 plug.
 

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You certainly can get a 14-50(Female) to 6-50 (Male)adapter for the mobile charger and you can certainly get an EVSE with a 6-50 plug.
As mentioned earlier, I would strongly avoid this without an explicit statement from Ford that the Ford Mobile Charger doesn't use the 120 V connection offered by the 14-50 plug and not the 6-50 plug.
 

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and I wouldn't be certain that the Ford Mobile Charger will work with that adapter. The NEMA 14-50 plug that it comes with provides BOTH 240 V and 120 V compared to the NEMA 6-50 only providing 240 V as the missing prong is the neutral line used to get 120 V.
What? The Ford mobile adapter comes with 2 plugs: a 14-50 for 240 volt and standard 5-15 plug for 120v. While a 14-50 outlet has the neutral prong, all of the hardwired EVSE's I've looked into don't need the neutral wired so I would expect the plug versions not to either.
 

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Are you confident that Ford Mobile Charger doesn't have GFCI built in? I have assumed that all EVSEs do.

It would be even better if you can provide a source for that.
Not all of his information is accurate.
 

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What? The Ford mobile adapter comes with 2 plugs: a 14-50 for 240 volt and standard 5-15 plug for 120v. While a 14-50 outlet has the neutral prong, all of the hardwired EVSE's I've looked into don't need the neutral wired so I would expect the plug versions not to either.
Yes the Ford Mobile Charger comes with both plugs (unlike Tesla's which decided to be cheap and only provide the 5-15 and charge you for others). And while I agree it's unlikely the charger uses the neutral wire of the 14-50 adapter, I personally wouldn't risk damaging a $50k car and voiding the warranty without confirmation of this.
 



 









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