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Escape/Kuga recall financial mess

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kdryden99

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Didn’t forget it but that impact on low volume car is not great.
It depends if it results in loss of sales. As another member here said, they are considering not waiting for the PHEV, when a lot of ppl are considering PHEVs right now and it gets delayed again. Its not good.
 

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The problem is not ford. It more goes to the supplier. The bill will go to the suppliers for parts that don't hold up. anytime there is a part shortage or the part fails. The supplier gets billed for it.

They have a proven ground and sign an agreement the product they sell will last for this amount of time stated or mileage. Then they agree on being able to meet a certain amount of parts at a given time. If either part is breached then the supplier is billed for the amount.
 
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kdryden99

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According to the article cell shortage is already an issue. These tier 1 battery suppliers are going to have supply issues with a such a burst in demand.
The introduction of EV's into the market wont go as fast as i thought if suppliers cant scale and produce inferior products if they rush supply.
 

dbsb3233

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According to the article cell shortage is already an issue. These tier 1 battery suppliers are going to have supply issues with a such a burst in demand.
The introduction of EV's into the market wont go as fast as i thought if suppliers cant scale and produce inferior products if they rush supply.
That should change over the next few years. There's a ton of new battery plants in the works to be built over the next few years. I think I read 113 around the world.
 
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That should change over the next few years. There's a ton of new battery plants in the works to be built over the next few years. I think I read 113 around the world.
Not many can mass produce though
 

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Wish someone would make a 50mile PHEV with fast DC charging.
Sounds like a money losing product. By that point the manufacturing cost is higher than a good BEV, so the sales price will be too. Nobody'd buy it.
 

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Really, a 50 miles PHEV with fast charging? why.. I mean that blows my mind that it would be desirable... You want to drive 50 miles, juice the battery with a high current, then drive another 50... AND you want a hybrid just in case you need to drive 51 miles between fast chargers...

I'm trying to picture a realistic scenario where DCFC would be useful in a PHEV.
Exactly. There's a reason it's a gimmick on the Outlander and not in any other PHEV. It's so much extra cost for zero added sales.
 

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Sounds like a money losing product. By that point the manufacturing cost is higher than a good BEV, so the sales price will be too. Nobody'd buy it.
Adding $100 fast charging equip to Honda Clarity PHEV that gets 50 miles would mean a $39,555 car vs. a $39,455 car.

10 minute fast charging, I’d be 100% EV, 90% of the time and even that 90% would 45 miles EV. Emissions reduction in the 95% range vs. ICE.

Co-worker does this with PHEV Porsche and Volvo. Great solution for family of four to be living the Kyoto dream.
 

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LYTMCQ

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Not many can mass produce though
"General Motors announced today that it was setting up a joint venture with South Korea’s LG Chem to mass-produce batteries for electric cars. The two companies plan to invest a total of $2.3 billion to build a new facility, which will be located in Lordstown, Ohio.

The new plant will essentially become GM’s own Gigafactory, with an annual capacity of more than 30 gigawatt hours. The facility will manufacture battery cells for the 20 new electric vehicles that GM plans to roll out by 2023, executives said. That includes a new EV from Chevy that is set to be released next year and a battery-electric pickup truck by late 2021."

https://www.theverge.com/2019/12/5/...-vehicle-battery-joint-venture-chem-lordstown
 
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Thats great and all but here is the other issue. With all these companies making batteries, the demand for resources will increase. If supply is limited the cost will go up. These batteries will not get cheaper even though industry keeps saying they will. Tech will just offset the material cost and the price wont change.
 

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Thats great and all but here is the other issue. With all these companies making batteries, the demand for resources will increase. If supply is limited the cost will go up. These batteries will not get cheaper even though industry keeps saying they will. Tech will just offset the material cost and the price wont change.
It's possible that raw materials will become the constraint, yes. Although I trust that these companies know what they're doing before investing $billions in terms of being confident that they can secure raw materials supplies well enough to build this many battery plants. Might still see some short-term constraints, but the alternative is to NOT build more plants and only be able to build a small # of EVs.

I think the more likely outcome is that all these new battery plants will help increase supply and reduce prices. Although prices are determined by the combination of supply and demand. If EV demand increases faster than battery supply can keep up, prices won't drop as quickly.
 
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It's possible that raw materials will become the constraint, yes. Although I trust that these companies know what they're doing before investing $billions in terms of being confident that they can secure raw materials supplies well enough to build this many battery plants. Might still see some short-term constraints, but the alternative is to NOT build more plants and only be able to build a small # of EVs.

I think the more likely outcome is that all these new battery plants will help increase supply and reduce prices. Although prices are determined by the combination of supply and demand. If EV demand increases faster than battery supply can keep up, prices won't drop as quickly.
its what i am betting on. And i think we might be the lucky ones in terms cost in the short run. Wait until all the other OEMs put their kangaroos in the ring. It's going to be a fight.
 

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If supply is limited the cost will go up. These batteries will not get cheaper even though industry keeps saying they will.
I believe the price per kWh of the EV batteries has been going down and storage capability goes up and this in time of increasing demand.

GM/LG battery uses less cobalt which is the main commodity constraint.

CATL battery (Xpeng, Tesla, BYD) offers "1 million miles".

Battery tech and mfg scale are both pushing price per kWh lower.
 



 









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