Adaptive Cruise Control - How Much Do You Trust it?

TOBG

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I use the adaptive cruise control all the time. It works for me. The adaptive cruise works much like it did on my Sonata and my Volt. I use it on freeways and state routes but not in city traffic. I have used the lane centering a couple of times to try it out. The lane centering works like my wife's 2018 Mustang from what I can tell. I might use the lane centering on the freeways. on trips.
 

timbop

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You're misunderstanding. Lane centering is not intended to steer the car, it's intended to assist you in staying within a lane. The fact that some people are using it to steer their MME's does not alter its intended use. This is not a matter of semantics. People are expressing surprise that they have to seize the steering wheel to prevent the car from going off the road. Lane centering is not hands-free, it's not FSD, and it's not the upcoming Active drive assisst.
I think you're referring to "lane keeping"; lane centering is indeed designed to keep the car centered in the lane through curves. Lane centering is the precursor to handsfree; you just have to have your hand on the wheel tightly enough for the car to decide you're paying attention.
 

MailGuy

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You're misunderstanding. Lane centering is not intended to steer the car, it's intended to assist you in staying within a lane. The fact that some people are using it to steer their MME's does not alter its intended use. This is not a matter of semantics. People are expressing surprise that they have to seize the steering wheel to prevent the car from going off the road. Lane centering is not hands-free, it's not FSD, and it's not the upcoming Active drive assisst.
Lane Keeping gives visual and stick shaker warning through steering wheel
A5E733B7-744E-45FA-8045-2FCABC5C6EE9.jpeg

Lane centering allows the car to self navigate
9E56D7EC-7E75-4894-A6E3-BBEE7C3E479D.jpeg
 

KAustin

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Just completed a 240 mile trip today with 200 miles of it on the highway. Left with 100% battery and 264 miles, returning with 7% and 18 miles left. Was at 78 mph for 90% of the highway time. Used Adaptive Cruise Control for most of it. Worked well except for the constant reminder to hold the steering wheel when my hand was already on it.

I'm not sure if this was mentioned previously, but I figured out that the key to not have the car abruptly slow down when someone jumps in front of you is to DRIVE IN WHISPER. I drive in Unbridled all the time, but because I wanted to test the range, I put it in Whisper today on the highway. (Although I don't think it made any difference) A car moved over in front of me at some point and I was ready to disengage the ACC, but noticed it wasn't slowing down so abruptly. It was more of a very moderate slow down to maintain the distance.

Try it...
 

milepost1

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A couple of times now, in bright sunshine, approaching a stoplight with cruise set, it did not seem to slow, I had to forcefully apply the brakes to bring it to a quick stop. The third time it happened, I watched carefully, and realized that all 3 times, the car I was approaching was white. Every time I approached a non-white vehicle, the Mach E slowed down, then more strongly, and in plenty of time to come to a stop. Maybe my Mach E is a bit contrast challenged? Be careful everyone!!
wish i could find the link. it explained why adaptive cruise control has a hard time "seeing" stopped cars. Basically most cars ignore stopped objects, and if you think about, almost all objects around a car are stopped objects.
 

GoGoGadgetMachE

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MailGuy

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Just completed a 240 mile trip today with 200 miles of it on the highway. Left with 100% battery and 264 miles, returning with 7% and 18 miles left. Was at 78 mph for 90% of the highway time. Used Adaptive Cruise Control for most of it. Worked well except for the constant reminder to hold the steering wheel when my hand was already on it.

I'm not sure if this was mentioned previously, but I figured out that the key to not have the car abruptly slow down when someone jumps in front of you is to DRIVE IN WHISPER. I drive in Unbridled all the time, but because I wanted to test the range, I put it in Whisper today on the highway. (Although I don't think it made any difference) A car moved over in front of me at some point and I was ready to disengage the ACC, but noticed it wasn't slowing down so abruptly. It was more of a very moderate slow down to maintain the distance.

Try it...
Yep, I find Whisper to be quite enjoyable. ACC reacts nicely and I also feel pulling up to a stop light is a smoother hold transition with 1PD on.
 

engnrng

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Thanks for that, GGGM! I will not count on collision avoidance, then, if the obstacle is stationary (!). I have never had this experience in the 2 years in my Kona Electric. It slows down approaching stopped cars quite well, sounds a collision alert if it is not slowing down quickly enough (for example, when the Domino Pancake happens (everyone braking hard in a line of at-speed cars on the freeway due to the front guy suddenly slowing down) or when someone cuts in front of me while traffic is already slowing). Ford engineers should really drive the Kona to aspire to something safer than a Tesla...
 

GoGoGadgetMachE

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Thanks for that, GGGM! I will not count on collision avoidance, then, if the obstacle is stationary (!). I have never had this experience in the 2 years in my Kona Electric. It slows down approaching stopped cars quite well, sounds a collision alert if it is not slowing down quickly enough (for example, when the Domino Pancake happens (everyone braking hard in a line of at-speed cars on the freeway due to the front guy suddenly slowing down) or when someone cuts in front of me while traffic is already slowing). Ford engineers should really drive the Kona to aspire to something safer than a Tesla...
tbf I'm more just explaining why stopped item detection is hard. I don't know how well the Mach-E does.

That said, you really shouldn't be relying on any such system, at least not today - they are all "SAE Level 2" which means they are all built with the assumption you're paying attention at all times. :)
 

engnrng

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tbf I'm more just explaining why stopped item detection is hard. I don't know how well the Mach-E does.

That said, you really shouldn't be relying on any such system, at least not today - they are all "SAE Level 2" which means they are all built with the assumption you're paying attention at all times. :)
I fully understand. I generally disengage the adaptive cruise when approaching high traffic on ramps or offramps, then resume on the more open stretches, regardless of brand, in order to avoid unexpected speed changes. I am commenting though, that I have been spoiled by the anti-collision performance on my Kona that the Mach E does not seem to have all the time. The Mach E experience is more like my Toyota or previous Ford CMax. I did expect more state-of-the-art with the current Ford system. But I am very pleased with both lane-centering and adaptive cruise when driving near the speed of surrounding traffic. Great for reducing fatigue on long trips and in stop/go traffic jams.
 

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