Benz pretends to be a bolt, catches fire NOT charging..

Mach1E

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What’s the data on cars catching fire spontaneously? Because I think that’s what people are worried about.

Edit:

And apparently the above numbers are totally bogus-

“You don't have to be a professional statistician to notice that these AutoInsuranceEZ numbers look a wee bit questionable. Because, EVs and hybrids aside, if 1530 conventional internal-combustion cars (aka, "most of the cars") are catching fire per 100,000 vehicles, that would equate to millions of car fires each year—as of 2020, there were roughly 270 million registered passenger vehicles in the US. Imagine that: You'd definitely know someone whose car caught fire. Maybe your car caught fire. It might be on fire right now! "Oh, another car fire," you'd say, driving past the third conflagration of your morning commute.”

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a40163966/cars-catching-fire-new-york-times-real-statistics/

Lol 😂 yeah it makes sense if you think about it. My town has around 200,000 cars.

If those stats were right, I would see about TEN car fires here per day!! 😂
 
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Maquis

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What’s the data on cars catching fire spontaneously? Because I think that’s what people are worried about.

Edit:

And apparently the above numbers are totally bogus-

“You don't have to be a professional statistician to notice that these AutoInsuranceEZ numbers look a wee bit questionable. Because, EVs and hybrids aside, if 1530 conventional internal-combustion cars (aka, "most of the cars") are catching fire per 100,000 vehicles, that would equate to millions of car fires each year—as of 2020, there were roughly 270 million registered passenger vehicles in the US. Imagine that: You'd definitely know someone whose car caught fire. Maybe your car caught fire. It might be on fire right now! "Oh, another car fire," you'd say, driving past the third conflagration of your morning commute.”

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a40163966/cars-catching-fire-new-york-times-real-statistics/

Lol 😂 yeah it makes sense if you think about it. My town has around 200,000 cars.

If those stats were right, I would see about TEN car fires here per day!! 😂
Those are all cars burned for any reason. That would include mass fires such as those that have occurred in California, and more recently, Maui. Also includes arson.

Stats for only cars that caught fire due to a failure of the car itself, or as a result of a crash would be more meaningful.
 

Mach1E

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Those are all cars burned for any reason. That would include mass fires such as those that have occurred in California, and more recently, Maui. Also includes arson.

Stats for only cars that caught fire due to a failure of the car itself, or as a result of a crash would be more meaningful.
Those stats are a complete fabrication. Based on the real fire data, the rate of fires for ICE is inflated waaaay more than the actual rate. 117k fires with 260 million vehicles is 44 per 100,000.

More details from the Car and Driver article:


To try to figure out where these numbers came from, we first contacted the National Transportation Safety Board, purported source for the car-fire statistics. And the NTSB's spokesman told us, "There is no NTSB database that tracks highway vehicle fires. We do not know what data AutoInsuranceEZ used for its research, but it did not come from an NTSB database." They suggested that perhaps the study authors confused the NTSB with NHTSA, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. So we contacted NHTSA.

And guess what? NHTSA doesn't collect fire data in this way, either. NHTSA—which we should call "the NHTSA," but that sounds weird—collects data on crashes but says that only about 5 percent of fires are crash-related.”
 
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Arsenic17

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What’s the data on cars catching fire spontaneously? Because I think that’s what people are worried about.

Edit:

And apparently the above numbers are totally bogus-

“You don't have to be a professional statistician to notice that these AutoInsuranceEZ numbers look a wee bit questionable. Because, EVs and hybrids aside, if 1530 conventional internal-combustion cars (aka, "most of the cars") are catching fire per 100,000 vehicles, that would equate to millions of car fires each year—as of 2020, there were roughly 270 million registered passenger vehicles in the US. Imagine that: You'd definitely know someone whose car caught fire. Maybe your car caught fire. It might be on fire right now! "Oh, another car fire," you'd say, driving past the third conflagration of your morning commute.”

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a40163966/cars-catching-fire-new-york-times-real-statistics/

Lol 😂 yeah it makes sense if you think about it. My town has around 200,000 cars.

If those stats were right, I would see about TEN car fires here per day!! 😂
Seems like this is the number of car fires in a calendar year divided by the car sales in that year. It is not considering the amount of cars on the road, only those sold in that year (at least it seems, it is ambiguous somewhat). The given rates will be massively inflated by a factor of 10-15 for that reason. When you consider that the numbers are more reasonable. Also this is not just explosions of cars that get totalled that count as car fires. Any small oil fire or a fire that starts following a collision would count. Heck even house fires with the car in the garage counts.
 

Mach1E

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Seems like this is the number of car fires in a calendar year divided by the car sales in that year. It is not considering the amount of cars on the road, only those sold in that year (at least it seems, it is ambiguous somewhat). The given rates will be massively inflated by a factor of 10-15 for that reason. When you consider that the numbers are more reasonable. Also this is not just explosions of cars that get totalled that count as car fires. Any small oil fire or a fire that starts following a collision would count. Heck even house fires with the car in the garage counts.
Seems more like the numbers were made up. Because they clearly LIED about the source of the data.

This is why people who got a C- in math shouldn’t be in charge of publishing articles with statistics on the internet.

See above, they were off by waaay more than a factor of 10-15.
 

Arsenic17

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"NHTSA doesn't collect fire data in this way, either. NHTSA—which we should call "the NHTSA," but that sounds weird—collects data on crashes but says that only about 5 percent of fires are crash-related.”

They don't collect data on car fires but somehow know how many car fires are crash-related vs spontaneous? Maybe that statement is a mistake. And they mean that only 5% of crashes involve cars catching fire thereafter?
 

mkhuffman

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... people who got a C- in math shouldn’t be in charge of publishing articles with statistics on the internet.
I bet most of our politicians did worse than that in math. Explains a lot, huh.

🤣
 

DevSecOps

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IMO the issue with electric vehicles is that they spontaneously catch fire or catch fire when charging. Additionally, they are VERY hard to extinguish. That's a huge difference vs an ICE vehicle which normally catches fire while on and are easily extinguished. EV activists don't want to talk about that elephant in the room.

I would 100000x rather a vehicle catch fire in the engine compartment of an ICE vehicle giving me time to get out of the vehicle vs an EV catching fire in the garage when I'm asleep and possibly causing the house and occupants to be jeopardized.

Additionally, there's a shit load more old ICE vehicles on the road vs EVs. As EVs age will the rate of fires increase?

As LFP and other battery technologies take over I hope to see the risk of fires shrink. NMC batteries and their potential fire risk are definitely something to have concern about.
 
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MacherAWD

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IMO the issue with electric vehicles is that they spontaneously catch fire or catch fire when charging. Additionally, they are VERY hard to extinguish. That's a huge difference vs an ICE vehicle which normally catches fire while on and are easily extinguished. EV enthusiasts don't want to talk about that elephant in the room.

I would 100000x rather a vehicle catch fire in the "engine" compartment of an ICE vehicle giving me time to get out of the vehicle vs an EV catching fire in the garage when I'm asleep and possibly causing the house and occupants to be jeopardized.

Additionally, there's a shit load more old ICE vehicles on the road vs EVs. As EVs age will the rate of fires increase?

As LFP and other battery technologies take over I hope to see the risk of fires shrink. NCM batteries and their potential fire risk are definitely something to have concern about.
I agree, it is a known risk with EVs that should be considered. I had a Bolt, and while never really worried I did have to leave it at the end of my driveway the final 6months I owned it. I have yet to install a detection system in my garage, but it is on my list.
 

Mach1E

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"NHTSA doesn't collect fire data in this way, either. NHTSA—which we should call "the NHTSA," but that sounds weird—collects data on crashes but says that only about 5 percent of fires are crash-related.”

They don't collect data on car fires but somehow know how many car fires are crash-related vs spontaneous? Maybe that statement is a mistake. And they mean that only 5% of crashes involve cars catching fire thereafter?
The important words are “in this way.”

They are referring to data on car fire vehicle type (hybrid, electric, ICE).

They know how many fires there are, they just don’t distinguish between car type.

It’s just further confirmation that the data is bogus. Can’t believe everything on the internet I guess. But it’s a good thing the internet fact checks itself sometimes. Actual investigative journalism is rare these days!

The 5% number does seem low but makes some sense. Cars are specifically designed NOT to catch fire in a crash. Hard to get a 5 star crash rating if they did! More likely mechanical failures (gas leak) etc.
 

RedStallion

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I'm still convinced we hear on the Internet about every EV that catches on fire, whereas ICE vehicles do so on a daily occurrence without being reported.
Not really, there is a lot more fires than being reported. In NYC alone "so far this year there have been 108 lithium-ion battery fires... Last year there were more than 200 fires from batteries from e-bikes, EVs, and other devices."

https://www.zerohedge.com/energy/it-time-ban-electric-vehicles
Sponsored

 
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