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Shayne

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I would think it would be 70% of what's visible to the user (68kw/88kw) through the UI or from measuring the charge that goes into the car. The upper buffer can never be charged and the lower buffer is effectively always charged - so you have no way to effectively measure either.
Concur only reason to segment off so much of the battery (if it is still there as we have been informed) is to increase the % degradation the warranty covers. That is to only thing I can come up with. 88 KWh vs 95 KWh does not sound sexier or go as far.
 

Shayne

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I live in the interior outside Fairbanks - so the coldest part of Alaska. Normally my cars stay in a heated garage at home and outside, uncovered at work. As soon as we get a really cold night, mid Januaryish, I’ll leave it outside overnight for week or so and see what happens.

I figure a successful, real world test in worst-case, Alaska winter conditions should give a warm and fuzzy (pun intended) for the MME’s worldwide buyers who also deal with challenging winters.

I’m not expecting any major MME cold weather issues. I’ve seen Porsche, Hyundai, and almost all the US manufacturers testing here the last few winters.
Thanks for the info. Don't abuse your new toy on our accounts. Mine will be outside for the first winter (if comes this) and covered, unheated, going forward from there. I understand that an L2 should help in maintaining it as it will not have the heated garage to thaw it out in. Time will tell and looking forward to the change. My wife is looking forward to pre-heat without me screaming green murder. Will look forward to your reviews.
 

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Concur only reason to segment off so much of the battery (if it is still there as we have been informed) is to increase the % degradation the warranty covers. That is to only thing I can come up with. 88 KWh vs 95 KWh does not sound sexier or go as far.
OK, let me give you another reason: Ford's whole approach with the Mach E is that it is familiar and easy for ICE buyers to switch to. Darren Palmer says it over and over again every time I see him speak. That's why the controls are exactly how they are on an ICE. To that end, the nav system and guess-o-meter have had a lot of effort put into them to be accurate and helpful enough so the average Joe can "just get in and drive" without having to preplan charging routes etc.

I believe for the same reason they have such a large battery buffer - so those same customers can charge their cars to 100% like they would fill a gas tank all the way. With a large buffer at the top, one can do that without adding significant degradation. I base tat assessment on conversations with my luddite wife - when I was explaining about how you have to manage a Tesla's battery, she said "what a pain. electric cars are too complicated".
 

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OK, let me give you another reason: Ford's whole approach with the Mach E is that it is familiar and easy for ICE buyers to switch to. Darren Palmer says it over and over again every time I see him speak. That's why the controls are exactly how they are on an ICE. To that end, the nav system and guess-o-meter have had a lot of effort put into them to be accurate and helpful enough so the average Joe can "just get in and drive" without having to preplan charging routes etc.

I believe for the same reason they have such a large battery buffer - so those same customers can charge their cars to 100% like they would fill a gas tank all the way. With a large buffer at the top, one can do that without adding significant degradation. I base tat assessment on conversations with my luddite wife - when I was explaining about how you have to manage a Tesla's battery, she said "what a pain. electric cars are too complicated".
If the vehicle is so smart and so connected they can put a big pop up on that huge 15" monitor with a yellow triangle and an ! mark for individuals they think are a concern and give us the range not ridiculous excuses. Thought trickle charging with a L2 was no prob. As they monitor your vehicle (per the hype) a pop up Warning we suggests you ..... if not this could effect your warranty or something more politically correct. Done 0.01% yahoos taken care of. Look at the degradation curves on page 8; you see a huge difference? None @ 30% for sure.
 

TheLight75

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If the vehicle is so smart and so connected they can put a big pop up on that huge 15" monitor with a yellow triangle and an ! mark for individuals they think are a concern and give us the range not ridiculous excuses. Thought trickle charging with a L2 was no prob. As they monitor your vehicle (per the hype) a pop up Warning we suggests you ..... if not this could effect your warranty or something more politically correct. Done 0.01% yahoos taken care of. Look at the degradation curves on page 8; you see a huge difference? None @ 30% for sure.
Ford is likely playing it very safe with battery degradation to make sure customers don't see significant drops over the lifetime of the car in range due to the extra buffer they have. Tesla did the same thing initially. As they built up confidence & millions of miles driven on their batteries, they started to periodically release additional capacity to their owners via OTA updates. It wouldn't surprise me if Ford does the same thing along the way as they learn how to refine their battery management algorithms and better understand the long-terms effects of their battery chemistry. I don't blame them for being cautious since they are betting their future on BEV's.
 
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Ford is likely playing it very safe with battery degradation to make sure customers don't see significant drops over the lifetime of the car in range due to the extra buffer they have. Tesla did the same thing initially. As they built up confidence & millions of miles driven on their batteries, they started to periodically release additional capacity to their owners via OTA updates. It wouldn't surprise me if Ford does the same thing along the way as they learn how to refine their battery management algorithms and better understand the long-terms effects of their battery chemistry. I don't blame them for being cautious since they are betting their future on BEV's.
At the same time, I think it does one more thing: it walls off more space that can be charged using regeneration. Even if you charge to 100%, the buffer gives you a built-in "downhill" mode.
 

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Ford is likely playing it very safe with battery degradation to make sure customers don't see significant drops over the lifetime of the car in range due to the extra buffer they have. Tesla did the same thing initially. As they built up confidence & millions of miles driven on their batteries, they started to periodically release additional capacity to their owners via OTA updates. It wouldn't surprise me if Ford does the same thing along the way as they learn how to refine their battery management algorithms and better understand the long-terms effects of their battery chemistry. I don't blame them for being cautious since they are betting their future on BEV's.
So they are testing the Tesla warranty theory over again? It was pouch cells where Jeff Dahn proposed a million mile battery. That is way too many cycles as other components also wear under normal use (grid?). I would think that Ford has thought about the maintenance and a battery swap. Hardware updates (not OTA) that some will do. Just pop in the latest and greatest 100 KWh in. You would think LG's will make 8 years no problem ; understand the math and the decision. Have faith the pony will run free 👍
 



 









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