PRNDL on the prototype

JamieGeek

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I think you guys are misunderstanding the question - it isn't "how long does it take to get used to it". The question is "what makes it so great"? So far the answer is that you don't have to move your foot from the right peddle to the left one, which isn't really all that compelling of an answer.
Well I did put 3 or 4 reasons down but the biggest is: Laziness ;) If I don't have to exert that extra effort to move my foot from accelerator to brake then I'm happy--a few less calories I have to expend 🤣;)
 

timbop

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I tried to explain; I can't really explain it. It's just something you end up getting used to and really liking a lot better. Trying to explain it to someone who hasn't experienced it is like trying to explain the color red to a blind person. At least it is for me.
Fair enough. Ted Williams couldn't explain how to hit either, so I guess we'll just get it once we do it
 

FredT

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One really nice benefit: No more brake dust on your wheels!
That's a (huge) benefit to electrics in general. After three years, the wheels on my A3 e-tron, which didn't have one-pedal driving, were pristine. I never had to clean them beyond a light hosing down.
 

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Well I did put 3 or 4 reasons down but the biggest is: Laziness ;) If I don't have to exert that extra effort to move my foot from accelerator to brake then I'm happy--a few less calories I have to expend 🤣;)
LOL, please don't be too lazy to hit that break in an emergency!
 

dbsb3233

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I tried to explain; I can't really explain it. It's just something you end up getting used to and really liking a lot better. Trying to explain it to someone who hasn't experienced it is like trying to explain the color red to a blind person. At least it is for me.
I'm looking forward to trying it. I think I have a pretty good idea of what it will be like. It's more than just not having to move your foot over (as much, anyway). I expect it'll just feel like more like precise control of speed from a single action (both up and down) rather than acceleration being one distinct function and deceleration being a separate distinct function. Like a joystick.

Or like the volume rocker on a TV remote rather than a button on the left side for UP and a button on the right side for DOWN that you have to go through the motion of lifting your finger to switch between.

At first I'm expecting it to be annoying though, as I'm used to lifting my foot off and just coasting. It's gonna feel weird feeling the vehicle slow down much faster as though my foot is on the break, maybe faster than I'd sometimes like. Just gonna take some getting used to.
 

Nak

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At first I'm expecting it to be annoying though, as I'm used to lifting my foot off and just coasting. It's gonna feel weird feeling the vehicle slow down much faster as though my foot is on the break, maybe faster than I'd sometimes like. Just gonna take some getting used to.
This.

It's very weird and annoying at first that you can't lift the accelerator and coast. Then you get used to it and love it, and hate the old way. There's still some learning to go though. There's a bit of an art to lifting your foot off the pedal and having it come to a stop precisely where you want it to without touching the brake. As you work up to that, you start slowing early and depressing the accelerator to reduce the regenerative braking so you can stop where you want to. If you're a little late starting the deceleration you just add a bit of brake right at the end. It's gratifying to learn to drive the car with enough precision that you don't need to correct at all. That said, most people will probably end up starting deceleration early and fine tuning the regenerative braking by feathering the accelerator.
 

zhackwyatt

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Thanks all. Sounds like it really is just a personal preference thing. I've heard multiple times it was more efficient with regen, and like I stated earlier, that doesn't make sense to me given that pressing on the brake doesn't mean using the brake pads.

I drove my friends Model 3 for about 30 feet before I had to turn one-pedal off. I didn't want to wreck his car (stop suddenly in front of someone because I wanted to coast) and I wasn't in a good location to experiment. I do plan on experimenting with the Mach-e.
 

K1TT

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Another thing to add to one pedal drive is the adaptive cruise that looks like it comes standard. Ford has set up adaptive cruise that comes to a complete stop, I got used to it when I had a Fusion Hybrid as a rental, barely had to use the accelerator pedal even haha 😂
 

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So, I have a manual transmission car right now as a daily driver. Never driven an EV, never experienced 1-pedal driving. But, it sounds from your descriptions it is exactly like a manual transmission car when you let off the gas, the engine braking kicks in. Although, perhaps the EV 1-pedal might be a tad more agressive.

You folk that have experienced 1-pedal in an EV, have you also owned a manual transmission, and can you confirm or compare the experiences of 1-pedal to engine braking in a manual?
 

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So, I have a manual transmission car right now as a daily driver. Never driven an EV, never experienced 1-pedal driving. But, it sounds from your descriptions it is exactly like a manual transmission car when you let off the gas, the engine braking kicks in. Although, perhaps the EV 1-pedal might be a tad more agressive.

You folk that have experienced 1-pedal in an EV, have you also owned a manual transmission, and can you confirm or compare the experiences of 1-pedal to engine braking in a manual?

Yeah it's kind of like engine braking. And yeah, it's a little more aggressive. But in an EV it's very linear, sometimes a manual ICE isn't, especially at low revs. And of course, you can't stall or anything. But it's always the same force no matter what speed or what, so very easy to modulate. You can take it all the way down to a crawl with regen, then usually just tap the brakes for a complete stop. At least that's how it is with Tesla.
 

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Ok...I am not this tech savvy, but I find the concept fascinating. To do the one pedal driving does that mean that you set the car in the L position???
 

Al your Pal

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I have no clue what L position will be used for. Every EV should have regenerative braking (and therefore one pedal driving) by default. If you're not clear on the concept, it's hard to explain more. I'd recommend scheduling a test drive with Tesla. You will notice it immediately and become comfortable with it within a few minutes. Most people prefer it once they get used to it. Hybrids have regen braking as well (that's how they achieve better gas mileage) so you can get a decent feel for it in a Prius. If that's easier for you to try.
 

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So, I have a manual transmission car right now as a daily driver. Never driven an EV, never experienced 1-pedal driving. But, it sounds from your descriptions it is exactly like a manual transmission car when you let off the gas, the engine braking kicks in. Although, perhaps the EV 1-pedal might be a tad more agressive.

You folk that have experienced 1-pedal in an EV, have you also owned a manual transmission, and can you confirm or compare the experiences of 1-pedal to engine braking in a manual?
I imagine trying to explain it to my Dad. It's akin to driving around in 1st gear except it's much much smoother when you slow to a stop with no lurching like you get using a manual.

On the acceleration, again it's like 1st gear but it just keeps pulling with none of the lurching you get as you shift nor is there any engine spooling up before you pop the clutch to get a quick start or between gears. It's amazing.

As a former 5sp manual driver, I actually think 1-pedal driving sensation is more intuitive than for autos since I always used the engine to slow down anyways with downshifts whenever possible.
 

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I imagine trying to explain it to my Dad. It's akin to driving around in 1st gear except it's much much smoother when you slow to a stop with no lurching like you get using a manual.

On the acceleration, again it's like 1st gear but it just keeps pulling with none of the lurching you get as you shift nor is there any engine spooling up before you pop the clutch to get a quick start or between gears. It's amazing.

As a former 5sp manual driver, I actually think 1-pedal driving sensation is more intuitive than for autos since I always used the engine to slow down anyways with downshifts whenever possible.
I understand the concept. My question was simply if you want to use the one touch driving then the car should be in the L position?? Not having it in the L position means normal driving correct???
 

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I wouldn't read too much into the PRDNL on these prototypes. There's a menu option for one-pedal driving in the car settings. With the rotary dial, the L position seems redundant to the one-pedal menu button on the touchscreen, no?

Seems like KIA has it right in the Niro EV's gear selector dial with D N R and center button for P. The dial self-centers. It's super simple and intuitive.

dims.jpeg
 
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