silverelan

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"Electric range revised..." seems like a redundant wording unless there's a different range we're not aware of.

The Garmin system has the potential to be incredibly powerful considering all of the possible data points they could be pulling from. Garmin does a lot of aeronautical flight systems which constantly monitors weather patterns, so if that information is cross shared with the MME, that's definitely a leg up on the real time estimates.
 

dbsb3233

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Sounds like a good idea, but I wonder if it uses the crowdsourced data 100% for the route, or whether it just uses it as an adjustment to tweak the range calculated from your own vehicle's running history?

What I'm getting at is that different people drive different ways. And use climate control and other accessories to different degrees. Or put on different tires. If I use the cabin heat rather than just heated seats, that uses more kWh and reduces range. If I'm an aggressive driver rather than a tame driver, that uses more kWh and reduces range. And so on. There's value in using your own driving data as well as the crowdsourced "average". I wonder if it's sophisticated enough to account for both?
 

macchiaz-o

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Sounds like a good idea, but I wonder if it uses the crowdsourced data 100% for the route, or whether it just uses it as an adjustment to tweak the range calculated from your own vehicle's running history?

What I'm getting at is that different people drive different ways. And use climate control and other accessories to different degrees. Or put on different tires. If I use the cabin heat rather than just heated seats, that uses more kWh and reduces range. If I'm an aggressive driver rather than a tame driver, that uses more kWh and reduces range. And so on. There's value in using your own driving data as well as the crowdsourced "average". I wonder if it's sophisticated enough to account for both?
It isn't hard to include a per driver or per VIN biasing factor. In fact it's something that could be done within vehicle without cloud processing.

It will be interesting to see how well Ford does this. Having a fairly reliable range estimator is something I've grown accustomed to in recent ICE vehicles.
 

Whatstreet

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Ford buyers (on average) will be more traditional than Tesla buyers, and the more they can copy from little things that their ICE drivers are already used to, the more comfortable it makes the transition to a BEV.
So your stereotype of a Ford driver is someone who resists change and avoids new technology making it necessary to make things that are different seem familiar. Also, you believe that Tesla drivers embrace change and new technology.

Which image would you prefer your car to cast.

Actually, I believe the issues of change and familiarity are with people at Ford rather than their customers.
 

dbsb3233

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So your stereotype of a Ford driver is someone who resists change and avoids new technology making it necessary to make things that are different seem familiar. Also, you believe that Tesla drivers embrace change and new technology.

Which image would you prefer your car to cast.

Actually, I believe the issues of change and familiarity are with people at Ford rather than their customers.
Like it or not, many mainstream consumers have a tendency to buy things they're more comfortable with. Buying a BEV when all they've ever owned is ICE is already a tough sell for many (mostly because of the slow refueling). It's part of the reason BEVs are still just 2% of new vehicle sales.

Is putting an "L" on the shifter dial instead of a "B" (or an "X" or a "Y" or a "Z") a big deal? No, of course not. But it's one of the many little things that would be different, and fewer is better if you're trying to turn ICE drivers into BEV buyers. "B" is less intuitive than "L". And "L" (traditionally for Lower gear) is at least applicable for slowing the vehicle down when taking your foot off the accelerator (which is what happens when you engage higher regen).
 

jhalkias

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Frankly, it's a no-brainer. I have no idea what Tesla was thinking when they didn't put in a driver dash display screen. I think every car in history has a driver dash display of some kind.
I’m trying not to be “traditional think” about this but to me it just doesn’t make ergonomic sense when Tesla removed that center console. It’s just so much more natural to have that information in easy view of the driver without distraction. That’s why vehicles (not just cars) have had it there practically since inception.
 

dbsb3233

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I’m trying not to be “traditional think” about this but to me it just doesn’t make ergonomic sense when Tesla removed that center console. It’s just so much more natural to have that information in easy view of the driver without distraction. That’s why vehicles (not just cars) have had it there practically since inception.
And safer. The closer the display is to your normal line of vision, the easier it is to swap focus between, and keep the road in your peripheral vision.

Frankly, I didn't even realize the Model 3 didn't have anything at all displaying on the driver-side dash until I recently Googled an image. I was shocked. Surprised that even passes government regulations.
 

macchiaz-o

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Frankly, I didn't even realize the Model 3 didn't have anything at all displaying on the driver-side dash until I recently Googled an image. I was shocked.
They weren't intended to be driven by humans for very long. You know, $40k+ for a personally owned driverless vehicle that will be used as a robotaxi for strangers. Any day now.

I'm surprised the Model Y includes a steering wheel and pedals. Removing them could have potentially brought the sale price below $25,000.
 

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Sounds like a good idea, but I wonder if it uses the crowdsourced data 100% for the route, or whether it just uses it as an adjustment to tweak the range calculated from your own vehicle's running history?

What I'm getting at is that different people drive different ways. And use climate control and other accessories to different degrees. Or put on different tires. If I use the cabin heat rather than just heated seats, that uses more kWh and reduces range. If I'm an aggressive driver rather than a tame driver, that uses more kWh and reduces range. And so on. There's value in using your own driving data as well as the crowdsourced "average". I wonder if it's sophisticated enough to account for both?
I think it will use both driver and external information. The per driver is easy and based on onboard information (the MME remembers each driver and learns what they do). The external is based on cloud sourcing and other outside information.
 

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Actually, in addition to the MINI and some older Land Rovers, there have been quite a few cars with center speedometers. Toyota has had a few with the Echo, Yaris (some years), and Prius. There's also been a Scion and, I think the Plymouth Prowler. The Ford GT is somewhat off-center also and the BMW Z8 was completely in the middle.
 

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Tesla Model 3 does not have a driver side display because they wanted to reduce cost. The Model S has a driver side display. I prefer a driver side display and that is one of things that I don't like about the car. Looks like the Tesla Cybertruck will omit the display also.
 

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And safer. The closer the display is to your normal line of vision, the easier it is to swap focus between, and keep the road in your peripheral vision.

Frankly, I didn't even realize the Model 3 didn't have anything at all displaying on the driver-side dash until I recently Googled an image. I was shocked. Surprised that even passes government regulations.
You'd think it would be a tough transition but it took me all of 10 minutes to get used to not having a display behind the steering wheel. That said, I like the MachEs subtle driver's info center. I think it's a good move.
 

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Actually, i know my wife would definitely feel much more comfortable with the mach e traditional controls over the tesla. Even i as a 35 year software engineer and computer nerd think tesla went too far. You have to use the touchscreen to turn on the windshield wipers, which is dangerous and will fluster my wife. On the turn signal stalk is a button to wipe once if a splash suddenly hits the windshield, so why not have all the wiper controls in the same place? They have "gone too cute by half", and I'm surprised regulators let them go that far.
 
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