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EA kWh Pricing Announced

Thevanin

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https://media.electrifyamerica.com/en-us/releases/111


Reston, VA (September 16, 2020) – Electrify America today introduced a new pricing structure designed to provide electric vehicle (EV) owners with consistent and transparent rates across its public brand-neutral fast-charging network.

Customers will now experience more competitive rates and overall savings in most cases as Electrify America now offers kilowatt-hour (kWh) pricing, depending upon the state where the EV is charged. Plus, all session fees have been eliminated.

Kilowatt-Hour Pricing - Rates as Low as $0.31 Cents Per kWh

Electrify America will now charge customers in 23 states plus the District of Columbia by the kilowatt-hour. This update reflects a growing preference by EV drivers for kWh pricing, which bills customers by the quantity of energy they use to charge their vehicle, similar to gas station pricing on a per-gallon basis. More than 78 percent of charging on the Electrify America network takes place in states where kWh pricing will be implemented. Rates start at $0.31 per kilowatt hour. For complete details, visit electrifyamerica.com/pricing.

In the remaining states where the company operates, Electrify America will continue to offer pricing on a per-minute basis with customers billed for the time spent charging. The network is introducing a simplified per-minute pricing structure with two power levels and reduced per-minute rates across the board, replacing the previous three-tiered power level pricing. Rates start as low as $0.12 per minute.

The simplest way to access these new competitive prices is by downloading the Electrify America mobile app which makes charging with Electrify America even easier. EV drivers can find a charging station, identify the number of chargers currently available, begin a charging session and track its progress – all from the mobile app.

Complete pricing information is available at ElectrifyAmerica.com/pricing and on the Electrify America mobile app.

“Electrify America has listened to feedback from electric vehicle owners, potential customers, and longtime industry advocates. As a result we have developed a new pricing structure that is fair, consistent, and recognizes the increasing customer demand for kilowatt-hour pricing,” said Giovanni Palazzo, president and chief executive officer of Electrify America. “With the new pricing, we deliver a simplified charging experience that shows new and existing customers how easy it is to own an EV.”

As the largest open DC fast charging network in the U.S., Electrify America is committed to offering a streamlined and transparent pricing structure that allows drivers to be confident in and satisfied with their charging experience. Outside of new prices, customers will enjoy the same premium and convenient charging experience at Electrify America’s more than 470 charging stations with over 2,000 DC fast chargers.

Electrify America continues to expand its public network of ultra-fast EV chargers with a goal to install or have under development approximately 800 total charging station sites with about 3,500 chargers by December 2021.
 

timbop

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Holy cow! That is a LOT better than I expected
 

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Not that I plan on using DC chargers very often, but I had assumed VA doesn't allow per kWh charging, and I guess I was correct.

Hopefully the states that don't yet allow it will quickly change course. I know in VA the local utilities around me claim to have a hard time even getting time-of-day for EV charging approved by the SCC.
 

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Well this is good news. I used abetterrouteplanner.com today to chart how much it would cost in a Mach E to go from here to my in-laws (we make this trip 3-4 times a year (roughly 450 miles)) and it was looking like $51 because of the billing per minute... this should help tremendously.
 

dbsb3233

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Holy cow! That is a LOT better than I expected
It sure is. Dramatic price cuts. Didn't see that one coming.

I calculated the difference in the other thread. Ironically, it may be cheaper to be in a per-minute state now. Those prices went down a whopping 68%!!!

I estimated the equivalent per-kWh price cut (based on MME charging) at a 40% price cut. Still huge.
 

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It sure is. Dramatic price cuts. Didn't see that one coming.

I calculated the difference in the other thread. Ironically, it may be cheaper to be in a per-minute state now. Those prices went down a whopping 68%!!!

I estimated the equivalent per-kWh price cut (based on MME charging) at a 40% price cut. Still huge.
Do you mind sharing your math? It's not that I don't believe you, I'm just super lazy.

From when Tesla used to charge per-minute here in NC, it was better at lower SoC. However, once you were at 80% or so, anything higher than that was murder on my wallet.
 

dbsb3233

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I was expecting something closer to the Ionity rate in Europe when they switched to per-kWh pricing (roughly $0.93/kWh). Figured they must have calculated that as a sustainable rate to self-fund the network.

But $0.43/kWh is way lower. Electricity costs less in the US, so that's surely part of it, but this is such a low rate that it doesn't seem sustainable to me to cover all the costs. Could actually make it harder for other competitors to enter the market.
 

GregM

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Not that I plan on using DC chargers very often, but I had assumed VA doesn't allow per kWh charging, and I guess I was correct.

Hopefully the states that don't yet allow it will quickly change course. I know in VA the local utilities around me claim to have a hard time even getting time-of-day for EV charging approved by the SCC.
Its not so much time of day rate as it is the smart meter roll out that the SCC is holding up...we can't do time of day with old meters. SCC thinks smart meter conversation is too expensive with not enough value back to the customer (which is awful thinking)
 

dbsb3233

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Do you mind sharing your math? It's not that I don't believe you, I'm just super lazy.
Sure. I'll just copy the whole post since I suspect this thread will become the (new) main one...

Wow, those prices are dramatically lower. Looks like the per-minute price cut is actually bigger than the equivalent per-kWh. $0.32/minute vs the old $0.99/minute is only 32% of the old rate. A 68% price cut!!!

Using Ford's 10-80% in 45 minutes charge time, that would have been 61.6 kWh costing $44.55 (at the full $0.99 rate) = $0.72/kWh. The new $0.43/kWh rate is a 40% price cut. (Counting full rate before to full rate after).

Either way though, it's a huge (and unexpected) price cut. I thought it might be slightly lower, but Wow.
 

GregM

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Assume as a MME owner and the partnership that Ford has with EA, that we become EA members? And get the EA Member rate?
 

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Sure. I'll just copy the whole post since I suspect this thread will become the (new) main one...

Wow, those prices are dramatically lower. Looks like the per-minute price cut is actually bigger than the equivalent per-kWh. $0.32/minute vs the old $0.99/minute is only 32% of the old rate. A 68% price cut!!!

Using Ford's 10-80% in 45 minutes charge time, that would have been 61.6 kWh costing $44.55 (at the full $0.99 rate) = $0.72/kWh. The new $0.43/kWh rate is a 40% price cut. (Counting full rate before to full rate after).

Either way though, it's a huge (and unexpected) price cut. I thought it might be slightly lower, but Wow.
So, on my napkin math if we do 10-80% (assuming the 61.6kWh), that would mean that using the new .31c/kWh (member pricing), it'll be ~19.10 to go from 10-80%.

If we do the per minute rate, and assume 45 minutes from 10-80%, it comes out to be about $10.80.... if that's the case I hope I can get away with charging in VA only on the way up to PA hahah.

(Someone correct my napkin math if it's just wrong)
 

dbsb3233

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So, on my napkin math if we do 10-80% (assuming the 61.6kWh), that would mean that using the new .31c/kWh (member pricing), it'll be ~19.10 to go from 10-80%.

If we do the per minute rate, and assume 45 minutes from 10-80%, it comes out to be about $10.80.... if that's the case I hope I can get away with charging in VA only on the way up to PA hahah.

(Someone correct my napkin math if it's just wrong)
Correct. Huge price cut. And now cheaper in a per-minute state. At least for a vehicle that charges like the MME.
 

dbsb3233

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Assume as a MME owner and the partnership that Ford has with EA, that we become EA members? And get the EA Member rate?
That's the assumption, that FordPass membership (that we get free for 2 years) will include the EA Pass+ rates. Although I don't think that's been officially confirmed.
 

dbsb3233

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So this eliminates the price penalty for charging above ~80%.

Still have the slow time penalty though (i.e. wasted time). And the risk of idle fees if you leave the car and forget to come back in time after it hits 100%.

Hope the app has alarms built in.
 



 










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