CCS to NACS

apwelsh

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Also extension cord might not suppport 250KW and upwards of charging speeds unless they have cooling system.
Isn’t DC fast charging limited to 140kW on MME anyways?
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ChasingCoral

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I am of the belief that the Tesla to CCS adapters won't have an intelligence to them, they won't "communicate" to the Tesla charger, except perhaps an indication of the speed capability of the adapter, or a manufacturer ID of some type.

There may be tiers of adapters, with an approved tier getting faster speeds than an unapproved tier, which pushes the unapproved to get approved.

I expect a rollout to Ford in the next 4 or less weeks.
Why would NACS to J-1772 require communication but NACS to CCS-1 wouldn't?
 

ChasingCoral

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bigredx86

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Fascinating. When did you get one for evaluations. Can you share pictures?
I don’t understand the condescending remarks and why they’re needed, if anything undermines your argument. I was simply interested to learn if someone found something I didn’t see.

While this is not a NACS to CCS1 adapter, the TeslaTap Tesla/NACS to J-1772 adapter certainly has circuitry.
"The adapter has a special circuit that allows it to work on any current Tesla charger including Destination Chargers."
http://www.umc-j1772.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=146
This is just manufactured fluff. Half of the adapters say they are “security tested, IP67.5(Made Up), and whatever else they can cram into the description.

There is no requirement for nacs to j-1772 to have a chip of any sorts, most, if you split open are just re-pins. In fact people like this guy have even swapped out the tesla connector to a j-1772 connector for the destination chargers, good watch (). Teslas have more requirements in the NACS plug but that’s only for Teslas.

I certainly expect such circuitry will be required for NACS to CCS1 adapters as well.
I simply doubt this since CCS1 is a simplistic connector compared to NACS, yes more complex than j1772, but just by adding the DC pairs. As long as the chargers and cars support the same communications standards then I don’t really see why a chip in the plug is required. Like I said before, I am interested to know if this is wrong and where you know that for sure. All I know of is the switch and a diode for the safety mechanism when talking about j1772/CCS.

Just because a manufacture decided to throw in a chip that has RGB, doesn't mean its required is my understanding.
 


ChasingCoral

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I don’t understand the condescending remarks and why they’re needed, if anything undermines your argument. I was simply interested to learn if someone found something I didn’t see.


This is just manufactured fluff. Half of the adapters say they are “security tested, IP67.5(Made Up), and whatever else they can cram into the description.

There is no requirement for nacs to j-1772 to have a chip of any sorts, most, if you split open are just re-pins. In fact people like this guy have even swapped out the tesla connector to a j-1772 connector for the destination chargers, good watch (). Teslas have more requirements in the NACS plug but that’s only for Teslas.


I simply doubt this since CCS1 is a simplistic connector compared to NACS, yes more complex than j1772, but just by adding the DC pairs. As long as the chargers and cars support the same communications standards then I don’t really see why a chip in the plug is required. Like I said before, I am interested to know if this is wrong and where you know that for sure. All I know of is the switch and a diode for the safety mechanism when talking about j1772/CCS.

Just because a manufacture decided to throw in a chip that has RGB, doesn't mean its required is my understanding.
Well, owning a TeslaTap, I know that you have to connect it to the NACS connector, wait 30 seconds to energize the chip, then plug into your car. If you don't wait, it won't connect.

Do you have different personal experience with a NACS to J-1772 adapter?

What happens when you wire in a different connector is immaterial.
 

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I am of the belief that the Tesla to CCS adapters won't have an intelligence to them, they won't "communicate" to the Tesla charger, except perhaps an indication of the speed capability of the adapter, or a manufacturer ID of some type.

There may be tiers of adapters, with an approved tier getting faster speeds than an unapproved tier, which pushes the unapproved to get approved.

I expect a rollout to Ford in the next 4 or less weeks.
I agree the adapters do not have any communications in them. One unit has a temperature sensor and it switches off the communication pins, in the event of an over temp. that is a simple relay. The car and charger stop when communications are lost, that is part of the safety logic.

The charger and the car both implement CCS protocol. There is no vin and no identification of vehicle type in that protocol. It is control logic, safety logic and payment credentials, the latter for plug and charge. A third communications link cannot be added, without a major update to the protocol.
 

AZBill

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Why would NACS to J-1772 require communication but NACS to CCS-1 wouldn't?
Because the original NACS protocol is completely different than J1772. The old V1/V2 Superchargers and the Destination chargers use that old protocol, which is proprietary to Tesla. NACS started out with one protocol for both AC and DC charging. J1772 (AC) and CCS (DC) do not use the same protocol.

V3/V4 Superchargers, and all newer Teslas, use CCS protocol, same as all CCS cars. J1772 is still different from that.
 

ChasingCoral

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Because the original NACS protocol is completely different than J1772. The old V1/V2 Superchargers and the Destination chargers use that old protocol, which is proprietary to Tesla. NACS started out with one protocol for both AC and DC charging. J1772 (AC) and CCS (DC) do not use the same protocol.

V3/V4 Superchargers, and all newer Teslas, use CCS protocol, same as all CCS cars. J1772 is still different from that.
That makes sense. I'm not sure it will turn out to be true, but it's possible no communication will be required.
 

ChasingCoral

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Just make sure to have a fire extinguisher handy, just in case they got it wrong.
Will an EV fire-extinguishing blanket fit in the frunk?
 

bshaw

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Here is a link to the A2Z web site where it explains the details about the adapter. It has no electronics, just simple wiring, and the temperature sensor cutoff.

https://a2zevshop.com/pages/the-typhoon-plug-nacs-to-ccs1-adapter-updates-information
Interesting page, thanks for sharing.

Their graph only shows 12-min of charging from 10% SOC to 50%, with the power sloping down to a min of 104 kW. I guess because the adapter was getting hot by then?
I would rather see the graph cover a 20 - 80% charge over ~40 minutes like the Mach E is capable of.
Also, graph indicates ambient temp of 48 deg F. Need to see data on how it performs on a HOT day.
 

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Interesting page, thanks for sharing.

Their graph only shows 12-min of charging from 10% SOC to 50%, with the power sloping down to a min of 104 kW. I guess because the adapter was getting hot by then?
I would rather see the graph cover a 20 - 80% charge over ~40 minutes like the Mach E is capable of.
Also, graph indicates ambient temp of 48 deg F. Need to see data on how it performs on a HOT day.
I think that graph was a test run using a Tesla. Teslas have a peak charge rate of 250kw and start down very early in the charging curve. It mentions a V3 charger, and was most likely a Model Y or X.

They likely connected NACS from the charger to the CCS adapter, then added the Tesla CCS adapter back to NACS after that.
 

AhardFSU

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I think that graph was a test run using a Tesla. Teslas have a peak charge rate of 250kw and start down very early in the charging curve. It mentions a V3 charger, and was most likely a Model Y or X.

They likely connected NACS from the charger to the CCS adapter, then added the Tesla CCS adapter back to NACS after that.
Their Youtube video shows that is exactly what they did.
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