CCS to NACS

ChasingCoral

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ChasingCoral

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I think that graph was a test run using a Tesla. Teslas have a peak charge rate of 250kw and start down very early in the charging curve. It mentions a V3 charger, and was most likely a Model Y or X.

They likely connected NACS from the charger to the CCS adapter, then added the Tesla CCS adapter back to NACS after that.
That's what others have done to test it as well.
 

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Because the original NACS protocol is completely different than J1772. The old V1/V2 Superchargers and the Destination chargers use that old protocol, which is proprietary to Tesla. NACS started out with one protocol for both AC and DC charging. J1772 (AC) and CCS (DC) do not use the same protocol.

V3/V4 Superchargers, and all newer Teslas, use CCS protocol, same as all CCS cars. J1772 is still different from that.
So this is what I understand as well but a slight thing to mention. CCS and NACS have the ability to communicate over pulse width modulation, so they can infect send vin and manufacture identifiers but no chips are required.

So yes Tesla will need to authorize other manufacturers, which is the “turn on” event others are talking about. But this worry of what adapters will be allowed I believe will be bunk as long as they follow the nacs spec.


Well, owning a TeslaTap, I know that you have to connect it to the NACS connector, wait 30 seconds to energize the chip, then plug into your car. If you don't wait, it won't connect.

Do you have different personal experience with a NACS to J-1772 adapter?

What happens when you wire in a different connector is immaterial.
Yes, my little adapter doesn’t need time for anything, plug in and connect. After both parties realize grounds and safety’s are satisfied, it starts charging. No more time then my normal j1772 chargers.

Tesla tap may of added something for whatever their reasons, unless you open it, I am willing to bet it’s just resistor to satisfy the NACS signal wires. The video I linked goes over that information, so, very much relevant.
 

ChasingCoral

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Tesla tap may of added something for whatever their reasons, unless you open it, I am willing to bet it’s just resistor to satisfy the NACS signal wires.
I’ll take that bet. The Tesla Tap has to be connected to the Tesla Charger for 30 seconds before plugging into the vehicle’s J-1772 port. I’m not aware of any resistor that takes 30 seconds to pass a current.
 

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I’ll take that bet. The Tesla Tap has to be connected to the Tesla Charger for 30 seconds before plugging into the vehicle’s J-1772 port. I’m not aware of any resistor that takes 30 seconds to pass a current.
I am not disagreeing with you, but I have not waited the required 30 seconds and my Tesla Tap has worked. I am not sure what the 30 seconds is for, but the Tesla Destination Charger had no issues even when I immediately plugged it in.
 


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No. MY21 Job 1s had NO electronic frunk release enabled. The hardware was there, it was just dead as a doornail. The only way to open the frunk was the old-school hood release. Then, someone discovered than one of the updates actually enabled the door pillar hood release. After that, someone else discovered that you could program an F150 fob for your car (if you had the door pillar update) and the frunk release button on the fob would work. The very last bit was a “procedure” (not sure of the right term) that had to be run in FDRS which enabled the frunk release button on the center screen. I was able to get my dealer to run the procedure for me. As I recall. After that procedure, the FordPass frunk release also became functional.
Ah ok, I thought you were referring to the key fob specifically when you mentioned remote. BTW I use the door panel all the time, noting that while it works, you do have to enter your door key every time you open the frunk, even when the car is already unlocked. Much more reliable than FordPass, but wish it could be a simple 7-8 press when the vehicle has already been unlocked.
 

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I am not disagreeing with you, but I have not waited the required 30 seconds and my Tesla Tap has worked. I am not sure what the 30 seconds is for, but the Tesla Destination Charger had no issues even when I immediately plugged it in.
I use a Gen 2 Tesla HPWC at home and have never waited 30 seconds to plug into my car with my 50A Tesla Tap.

That said, I've had failures using Tesla's destination chargers at a hotel. I'm now wondering if the 30 seconds wait is the key to preventing the failure.
 

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I use a Gen 2 Tesla HPWC at home and have never waited 30 seconds to plug into my car with my 50A Tesla Tap.

That said, I've had failures using Tesla's destination chargers at a hotel. I'm now wondering if the 30 seconds wait is the key to preventing the failure.
the teslatap has a bypass circuit wired in parallel - they call it a "coffee bean".

the 30s wait is for a tesla wall charger to timeout trying to connect to a car with their SW-CAN protocol. tesla may have done away with the need for that wait in recent firmware updates but it may still catch you on older models/versions.
 

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the teslatap has a bypass circuit wired in parallel - they call it a "coffee bean".

the 30s wait is for a tesla wall charger to timeout trying to connect to a car with their SW-CAN protocol. tesla may have done away with the need for that wait in recent firmware updates but it may still catch you on older models/versions.
Good to find out what it’s for. Thanks.
 

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The old Tesla interface is CAN bus, like Chademo, but J1772 is analog. That is why they were able to have the Tesla to Chademo adapter, prior to Tesla switching to CCS. This is why older Teslas cannot charge on CCS, without a hardware mod.
 

ChasingCoral

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