Ford Charger for Mach-E

macchiaz-o

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And do we know what 240 Volt configuration and amperage we will wire for?
This was covered earlier in this thread by @1pt21Gigawatts, who works for the group that is designing the chargers. The mobile charger's max current is 32A and includes NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 5-15 plugs. If you want the max charge rate, you'll need a 240V circuit rated at 40A or greater, with a 14-50R receptacle. Ford says this will let you recover about 22 miles of range per hour.

Ford says the 5-15 plug will only recover about 3 miles of range per hour, on average. I'm guessing this "average" accounts for low temperature conditions. (The battery has more internal resistance when it's cold.) And, I think they're drawing way less than 12A to play it safe in case the circuit's shared with lights or door openers.

Adapters will only be sold by Ford for Ford charging cords. If you use anything else I am sure your warranty will be void.
I've got a circuit in my garage that I ran with 10/3 NM-B about 15 years ago. I'm only using it for 120V 20A receptacles. I plan to remove all but one of its outlets and change the receptacle to a NEMA 14-30R (as well as replacing the breaker) to use for charging the MME.

I'm hoping Ford will be selling adapters similar to what you showed earlier from Tesla, so that I can get the proper adapter from them for the mobile charger. I don't know if they're planning to offer them, yet. If not, I might get a Clipper Creek since they sell it with the correct plug, or I might have to replace my wiring.
 

macchiaz-o

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Yeah, my current plan is to mount a NEMA 14-50 to the ceiling in the middle of the garage. I think that will give me the most flexibility.
I'm thinking of doing the same. Not really for flexibility, but to keep the circuit length shorter. It's 85 feet from the house's main panel to the subpanel ("load center"?) that I installed in the garage... and the garage panel is at the opposite corner of the two-car space from where MME's charge port will be.
 

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When I had the plug for my EVSE(s) installed the electrician put the breakers on a new 2nd meter on the far side of the house, ran the wires through the basement ceiling into the garage, up the garage walls, over the ceiling and down to where the plug is--its about as far as possible you could run some wires in our house without going to the 2nd floor LOL.

Yup: The EVSE's are on their own meter which has an "Experimental EV" rate from the power company (basically dirt cheap to overnight charge).
 

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When I had the plug for my EVSE(s) installed the electrician put the breakers on a new 2nd meter on the far side of the house, ran the wires through the basement ceiling into the garage, up the garage walls, over the ceiling and down to where the plug is--its about as far as possible you could run some wires in our house without going to the 2nd floor LOL.

Yup: The EVSE's are on their own meter which has an "Experimental EV" rate from the power company (basically dirt cheap to overnight charge).
Can you share more about your experience with adding a second meter (process, price, timing)? Is there a new second panel installed during that process to hold the new breakers? What made you decide to put in a second meter instead of going with 'time of use' electrical rates?

I'm thinking I'll do most of my charging at work, but will want to charge at home as a back up. I'm trying to decide if I should have DTE put in a second meter or just run a new circuit off of my existing 200 amp panel. I don't think the 'time of use' rates with DTE would work well for me since I have the wife and kids home all summer on the XBOX and running the AC. And I won't be charging all that much at home.
 

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Can you share more about your experience with adding a second meter (process, price, timing)? Is there a new second panel installed during that process to hold the new breakers? What made you decide to put in a second meter instead of going with 'time of use' electrical rates?

I'm thinking I'll do most of my charging at work, but will want to charge at home as a back up. I'm trying to decide if I should have DTE put in a second meter or just run a new circuit off of my existing 200 amp panel. I don't think the 'time of use' rates with DTE would work well for me since I have the wife and kids home all summer on the XBOX and running the AC. And I won't be charging all that much at home.
This was all done as a package with our power company back in 2013. They were offering up $2500 towards your install, funny our install totaled at $2600--I paid just the $100 difference. (I think they were getting a tax break for customers installing EVSE's and they were just passing that on to the customer.)

This included everything: The wiring, the extra panel, the EVSE (the Bosch one), and the extra meter.

The EV meter has an extra panel next to it with the two breakers for the plug (both are on the outside of the house).

I did go with time of use pricing on that meter; the house remains on the normal residential plan (and my bill has two sections: one for the house, and one for the EV).

Thus I know exactly how much electricity the EV uses on a monthly basis (so far it costs me about $50/month to drive the Bolt about 1000 miles/month--in the summer it can be as low as $35/month and winter it may approach $60/month). Before I started driving plugins I was driving an F-350 that was costing upwards of $350/month in gas.

As far as timing it took a while (almost a month if I remember correctly) to get everything installed simply due to coordination: my power company didn't do the install so after first signing up with them I had to wait for the electrician to get a quote, the power company to approve it, then the wiring, then get inspected by the city, the power company to install the meter, and then finishing up.
 

dbsb3233

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I am hoping to find out what a simple 240v outlet install is likely to cost. In my case, it's a fairly new home (2014) with a straighforward path from the breaker box on the outside of the house through the crawl space into the garage. 75' of Romex should do it. In fact I'd be happy to do it myself but I'm not as comfortable with 240v. And don't know if there's permitting required.

I'm considering doing much of the legwork myself (buying the materials, cutting the holes in the wall and fishing the wire so it only needs to be connected on each end and inspected), but I don't know if that will save much. Seems like it's simple enough that it shouldn't cost more than $300 or something for electrician labor, but I'm probably being naive.

I've watched a couple of YouTube videos of self-installs and it looks simple enough. Maybe I'll just do it myself.
 

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Hi all

I’m based in Ireland, we don’t even have our configurator up on the Irish site (dealers say “soon”) so I don’t have anything ordered yet. Like yourselves I have loads of questions and have been scouring the net to see what I can learn about this intriguing machine.

My current question is about the Ford charger. Does this exist in the US already as an available product, or either way has anyone any idea how much Ford would charge for it?

Mainly though, would the general wisdom be to stick with a car manufacturer’s proprietary product for this type of thing (perhaps guaranteeing greater electronic compatibility with charge info, etc), or would you, as likely future Mach E owners, readily consider any other home chargers on the market?

Thanks in advance! 👍
In a youtube video by Twit tv where they got to sit in a Mach E at CES, Darren Palmer from Ford (Product Chief of EVs) revealed that they would include a charging station with the car purchase. Not sure if its extra or already baked into the MSRP. Station will be able to handle A/C voltages of 120 and 240 (those numbers might different in Ireland).


However as long as you get a charger for home that is the CCS / J1772 you will be good. I'd wait on that for the moment. You can search them on Amazon to get an idea of what's out there.

I actually started a youtube channel (Mach Dad) with intentions of making videos about subjects like this in relation to the Mach E. I have a couple other videos up at the moment.
 

Mach Dad

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I am hoping to find out what a simple 240v outlet install is likely to cost. In my case, it's a fairly new home (2014) with a straighforward path from the breaker box on the outside of the house through the crawl space into the garage. 75' of Romex should do it. In fact I'd be happy to do it myself but I'm not as comfortable with 240v. And don't know if there's permitting required.

I'm considering doing much of the legwork myself (buying the materials, cutting the holes in the wall and fishing the wire so it only needs to be connected on each end and inspected), but I don't know if that will save much. Seems like it's simple enough that it shouldn't cost more than $300 or something for electrician labor, but I'm probably being naive.

I've watched a couple of YouTube videos of self-installs and it looks simple enough. Maybe I'll just do it myself.
I'm planning on doing it myself. My run isnt as straight forward as yours seems to be. I'm estimating about 100' run, as I have to go up and over my garage ceiling to get to the side of the garage I want a plug. I'm estimating between $200-400 for materials.

I'm not using a 40 amp breaker in my box because it was for a stove that's now gas. Gonna swap that for a 50amp and run a line from there. If you need to add additional breakers that might require an electricians help.
 

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Lets all slow down as we have plenty of time for electric. ;)
And hire an Electrican !! :oops:

120799352.jpg
 

dbsb3233

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Anyone know what would happen if we just wired a 30A circuit? Will the 32A Ford Mobile Charger know to lower it's amp draw (or have a configurable setting) to only 30A, or will it try to draw the full 32A and risk tripping the breaker?

Frankly, the slight loss in charging speed dropping from 32A to 30A would be a non-issue to me.
 

macchiaz-o

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With a 30A circuit, you're limited to 24A charging current (80% continuous load).

We don't yet know how charging rate is limited with the mobile charger. Tesla does it by detecting which plug adapter is connected. I'm hoping Ford does the same, by providing or selling 30A adapters for people with 30A circuits and receptacles.
 

dbsb3233

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With a 30A circuit, you're limited to 24A charging current (80% continuous load).

We don't yet know how charging rate is limited with the mobile charger. Tesla does it by detecting which plug adapter is connected. I'm hoping Ford does the same, by providing or selling 30A adapters for people with 30A circuits and receptacles.
That thought crossed my mind too, that if it did drop down, it would probably drop below 30A as you don't want to push it right to the limit where a slight surge trips the breaker. But even 24A would probably be fast enough.

I only ask in case there's an issue with breaker panel load that makes a 40A/50A circuit problematic, but there's enough for a 30. It's not likely though. Otherwise no reason not to just wire the 40A/50A.

I did have to replace a breaker a few months ago. After years of use, my treadmill suddenly started tripping the bedroom breaker. Turns out it's one of the new AFCI breakers that are more prone to trip when they start aging from electric motor arcing. Treadmills are a frequent culprit. That took some sleuthing to figure out. Fortunately Home Depot had the exact replacement breaker and it was a fairly easy DIY fix.
 

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the max charge rate, you'll need a 240V circuit rated at 40A or greater, with a 14-50R receptacle. Ford says this will let you recover about 22 miles of range per hour.---

a 14-50 outlet with a 50 amp breaker and 6AWG wire nets a Tesla around 30 miles per hour of range. The Tesla has a 11.5kWh on board charger as does the Mach E meaning the Mach E should get around 30 miles per hour of charging with this setup.
 

macchiaz-o

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the max charge rate, you'll need a 240V circuit rated at 40A or greater, with a 14-50R receptacle. Ford says this will let you recover about 22 miles of range per hour.---

a 14-50 outlet with a 50 amp breaker and 6AWG wire nets a Tesla around 30 miles per hour of range. The Tesla has a 11.5kWh on board charger as does the Mach E meaning the Mach E should get around 30 miles per hour of charging with this setup.
The press release I linked to is describing two different home charging options. The mobile charger included with the car is the one that can get you up to 22 miles of range per hour. The optional connected, wall charger will net you up to 32 miles of range per hour, according to Ford. (This maximum rate requires a 60A or greater circuit, by the way.)

Mobile charger provided with vehicle: 32A max current at 240V
Connected wall charger, optional accessory: 48A max current at 240V

We don't know yet if the car is equipped to AC charge at greater than 11.5kW levels... probably won't know until people get the car and attempt it.
 
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