Poll: How full do you plan on charging your Mach E on a regular basis?

To what % full (of usable battery) do you plan on charging on a regular basis?


  • Total voters
    159

JamieGeek

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Maybe this will change, but ChargePoint's business model has been all about deriving continuous and ever-increasing cash flow rather than promoting EV usage. They have grown VERY large in a very short amount of years, very successful from a business standpoint. Unfortunately, as a result of higher operating expenses on the part of EVSE owners, my experience has been that many, but not all, ChargePoint owners on the network charge higher $/kWh than some other brands of chargers. I use PlugShare app to find lower cost stations whenever I can.
The vast majority of Chargepoint stations in the Metro Detroit area are free.

 

ChasingCoral

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But I think the car can do that too. That's what I meant about that feature helping, for someone that tends to take long weekend trips. Just set the weekends to always charge to 100%.
Yes, you can program the car for charging at selected times, including pre-conditioning the cabin:

IMG_6188.jpeg
 

ChasingCoral

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Well yes, but you'd have a general expectation that any charger with a big "Chargepoint" label on it would also show up on Chargepoint's map and, in many cases, that isn't true.

It would appear that Chargepoint is not only a network, but also a hardware supplier. Thus you can purchase Chargepoint's equipment without adding it to Chargepoint's network.
Agreed. Some of those might be only for members of an internal "network" for a business, residence, etc. I've run across a few of those.
 

ChasingCoral

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Another good reason to just charge to 80-90% unless the full range is really needed:

https://www.greencarreports.com/new...v-recall-owners-asked-to-charge-to-90-for-now
Fire concern prompts 2017-2019 Chevy Bolt EV recall, owners asked to charge to 90% for now
avatar-image-for-bengt_100544847_s.jpg

BENGT HALVORSON NOVEMBER 13, 2020

General Motors announced Friday that an ongoing investigation over fire concern is prompting a broad recall affecting most 2017-2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV models.

The recall includes 68,667 vehicles globally and 50,925 in the U.S. Since GM is still unsure of the root cause of the fires, it can’t release the customary percentage of vehicles affected.

For now, the recall remedy is effectively a band-aid—a software flash that needs to be done at the dealership that helps limit the Bolt EV’s maximum state of charge to 90%. With 2017-2019 models carrying a 239-mile EPA range rating, that potentially takes about 24 miles out of the Bolt EV’s available range.

let-bolt-ev-at-public-charging-station_100694027_l.jpg
2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV at public charging station

GM is recalling only those vehicles with cells made by LG Chem in South Korea. Bolt EVs with LG Chem cells made in Holland, Michigan, supplied for the car partway through the 2019 model year, aren’t included in this recall concern; neither are model-year 2020 Bolt EVs, which received a different LG Chem cell, as part of an upgrade to 66 kwh and a 259-mile rating.

The announcement follows a safety probe launched by NHTSA in October, in response to reports of at least three instances of fires. So far, there are five confirmed instances, each of them when the vehicle was parked with a full or nearly full state of charge.

“We were already deep into our own investigation,” said Bolt EV chief engineer Jesse Ortega, on a call with the media announcing the recall effort. Keeping cars on the road but with a reduced maximum charge reduces the risk while allowing GM time to find the appropriate repair.

-chevrolet-bolt-ev-showing-full-charge_100694028_l.jpg
2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV showing full charge

The 90% limitation is a temporary reduction, and GM hopes to have a remedy in place soon after the start of the year.

GM has released an info page and video, walking owners through how to make sure their vehicle is set to charge to 90%—and to activate the recommended Hilltop Reserve mode. If they choose not to do this, it recommends that owners not park their car in the garage.

The effort includes a stop-sale, in which any last new 2019s will need to be given the remedy before being sold, and it’s asking dealers to do the update before selling used or certified pre-owned Bolt EVs.

Dealers are being notified of the campaign today, and the software will be available on November 17.
 

pt19713

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Do we "have to" stop short of charging to 100% all the time? No.

But might it help slow battery degradation over time just a bit? Probably.

Batteries have gotten a lot better in recent years, and it appears battery degradation is becoming less of a thing in newer EVs. But it's not non-existent either. Heat can cause degradation, and charging causes heat. But slow charging doesn't cause nearly as much, so charging on 240V L2 is of much less concern. Charging at home to 100% should be fine, even though stopping a little short of 100% is probably slightly better. Constantly charging on high power though (L3) is likely to degrade the battery faster.

So it's really a matter of degree. If you want to be extra cautious to maximize battery life, stop a little short of 100% when not needed. But the difference is probably minor at this point.
Read this article if you want to learn some of the technical things in the background. It might change your stance on charging to 100% and not driving it.
https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/bu_1003a_battery_aging_in_an_electric_vehicle_ev

The heat from L2 charging is minimal and isn't a concern. The issue will be Lithium plating if you keep it at a higher SoC for extended periods.
 


engnrng

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The vast majority of Chargepoint stations in the Metro Detroit area are free.
Free to drivers, maybe. Someone is paying. Typically taxpayers don't know that any provided service or any tax is ultimately paid by them in all cases. Except, of course the Feds who can print as much $$ as they like.
 

ClaudeMach-E

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Free to drivers, maybe. Someone is paying. Typically taxpayers don't know that any provided service or any tax is ultimately paid by them in all cases. Except, of course the Feds who can print as much $$ as they like.
I believe that where Chargepoint charging is free it's because it's offered has a complimentary service by an hotel, restaurant, grocery store or shopping centre. I don't think it has much to do with taxpayers money or it would not be most of the time.
 

dbsb3233

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I believe that where Chargepoint charging is free it's because it's offered has a complimentary service by an hotel, restaurant, grocery store or shopping centre. I don't think it has much to do with taxpayers money or it would not be most of the time.
Or some of both. Even in the case where the business it's in the parking lot of may be paying for it, they probably got a significant% tax subsidy/credit.

And sometimes the place where the charger is at is government (i.e. paid with taxes). For instance a recent pair of Chargepoint chargers went in at the Utah Dept of Transportation building in Richfield UT ("free"). I only know that one because it's an ideal stop on I-70 we'll use for our Denver-Vegas drives.
 

ClaudeMach-E

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Or some of both. Even in the case where the business it's in the parking lot of may be paying for it, they probably got a significant% tax subsidy/credit.

And sometimes the place where the charger is at is government (i.e. paid with taxes). For instance a recent pair of Chargepoint chargers went in at the Utah Dept of Transportation building in Richfield UT ("free"). I only know that one because it's an ideal stop on I-70 we'll use for our Denver-Vegas drives.
Is that a level 2? Cause I'm talking more about level 2, level 3 is another ballgame since it's cost so much more.
 

dbsb3233

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Is that a level 2? Cause I'm talking more about level 2, level 3 is another ballgame since it's cost so much more.
That particular one is L3 (125 kW, which is why I'm looking forward to it). But I have seen the similar thing with L2's. Like for instance the school down road from me has two L2 chargers in the parking lot, as do some other government facilities.

But I'm sure you're right that many of them in private business parking lots pay for their own (minus significant tax credits, of course, like the 30% I'm getting for having installed the one in my garage).
 

RockDaphne98296

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So I am very interested in the logic of partial charging and trying to support long term health of my very expensive new battery once I bring my FE home (I am thinking the first week of January - considering my build week is Dec 14th)

I have seen a significant drop in efficiency in my 2017 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV over the past 4 years

I have a Level 2 Charger at Home - outlet was professionally installed by an electrician (just clarifying for any questions), Brand is Juicebox - installation is literally hang it on the wall and plug it in, then connect to your wi-fi. The Fusion Energi has a "20~25 Mile" range in full electric before it switches to a hybrid. I charge it every night. The charge is limited to 95% - although I can't find where it is limited - I have the Juicebox set to 100%, I have not found a setting in the car so it might be automatic... My first year I got over the 25 mile range with typical driving hacks (I am not a dedicated hypermiler) - taking no road higher than 35 mph (funnily enough, surface streets to work is 14 miles where freeway is 27 miles), paying close attention to my driving, trying to save energy with smooth stops, foot off the pedal on down hills, etc. My average gas mileage that first year was 150 mpg during the summer, and was around 90 mpg during the winter due to temps, using the heater and wipers - the usual. But each year since it has dipped - going on 4+ years (purchased Aug 2016), I now get maybe 19 EV miles in the middle of summer and being on best behavior, last winter it was around 14 miles. My average gas mileage this summer was 110 mpg and last winter it was ~75-80mpg. I am really not sure how much working from home has hurt or maybe even helped.

I see that everyone talks about the 80 or 90% charging plan and maybe even not charging every night (which I currently do like clockwork). I can set my Juicebox to charge during specific timeframes and to limit the charge - so I am set up for this... any pointers?

Also, any idea where I can edu-macate myself on EV batteries? I am diving in on that battery university site as we type ;-D It would be interesting to see a comparison between FORD/CHEVY/TESLA etc.

P.S.
I have the opportunity to charge at work - but it is literally just a wall of regular outdoor plugs - no true stations, so for a full EV probably really only valuable for emergencies. Only the PHEVs and one Leaf currently use it every day to charge - none of the Tesla's or Bolts use the charging wall. I think it would take all day to get any usable miles - so definitely not a big impact on a full EV.
 

ChasingCoral

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I believe that where Chargepoint charging is free it's because it's offered has a complimentary service by an hotel, restaurant, grocery store or shopping centre. I don't think it has much to do with taxpayers money or it would not be most of the time.
A number of local governments have provided free charging. Maryland provided free DCFC at two service plaza for about 2 years. Honolulu provided free parking and charging downtown for a while. Some of these were local implementation of Federal funds to encourage CO2 reduction. Others were strictly local funding.
 

ChasingCoral

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So I am very interested in the logic of partial charging and trying to support long term health of my very expensive new battery once I bring my FE home (I am thinking the first week of January - considering my build week is Dec 14th)

I have seen a significant drop in efficiency in my 2017 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV over the past 4 years

I have a Level 2 Charger at Home - outlet was professionally installed by an electrician (just clarifying for any questions), Brand is Juicebox - installation is literally hang it on the wall and plug it in, then connect to your wi-fi. The Fusion Energi has a "20~25 Mile" range in full electric before it switches to a hybrid. I charge it every night. The charge is limited to 95% - although I can't find where it is limited - I have the Juicebox set to 100%, I have not found a setting in the car so it might be automatic... My first year I got over the 25 mile range with typical driving hacks (I am not a dedicated hypermiler) - taking no road higher than 35 mph (funnily enough, surface streets to work is 14 miles where freeway is 27 miles), paying close attention to my driving, trying to save energy with smooth stops, foot off the pedal on down hills, etc. My average gas mileage that first year was 150 mpg during the summer, and was around 90 mpg during the winter due to temps, using the heater and wipers - the usual. But each year since it has dipped - going on 4+ years (purchased Aug 2016), I now get maybe 19 EV miles in the middle of summer and being on best behavior, last winter it was around 14 miles. My average gas mileage this summer was 110 mpg and last winter it was ~75-80mpg. I am really not sure how much working from home has hurt or maybe even helped.

I see that everyone talks about the 80 or 90% charging plan and maybe even not charging every night (which I currently do like clockwork). I can set my Juicebox to charge during specific timeframes and to limit the charge - so I am set up for this... any pointers?

Also, any idea where I can edu-macate myself on EV batteries? I am diving in on that battery university site as we type ;-D It would be interesting to see a comparison between FORD/CHEVY/TESLA etc.

P.S.
I have the opportunity to charge at work - but it is literally just a wall of regular outdoor plugs - no true stations, so for a full EV probably really only valuable for emergencies. Only the PHEVs and one Leaf currently use it every day to charge - none of the Tesla's or Bolts use the charging wall. I think it would take all day to get any usable miles - so definitely not a big impact on a full EV.
We'll know more about how we can program charging once we have the cars and the fully-functioning Ford Pass app. I definitely saw an option to stop charging at a particular SOC in a demonstration of Sync 4a but couldn't find in the charging screens when I visited a Mach E last week.
 

RockDaphne98296

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...but couldn't find in the charging screens when I visited a Mach E last week.
So Jealous! Why does it seem that EVERYONE has had a chance to sit in one or see it in real life except for me? Sigh...
 

JamieGeek

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So Jealous! Why does it seem that EVERYONE has had a chance to sit in one or see it in real life except for me? Sigh...
You are not alone.

Although I can say that I've seen them on the road but nothing up close and definitely not been able to touch one LOL.

 

 
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